Digital Citizenship @
your school
June Wall
Consultant in eLearning and
Libraries
Overview of
webinars
1. Digital Citizenship @ your school.
 What is the purpose of Digital Citizenship in the
context of ...
A 2010 ACMA research report, Australia in the
digital economy: The shift to the online
environment, shows the internet is ...
Aussie Teens Online
2014
http://www.acma.gov.au/theACMA/engage-blogs/engage-blogs/Research-snapshots/Aussie-teens-
online
Aussie Teens Online 2014
 89% have a mobile phone
 69 per cent of mobile phone users have a
smartphone
 56 per cent use...
Aussie Teens Online 2014
Since December 2009, the proportion of teenage
internet users has:
 declined by four percentage ...
Greater use does not equate to greater understanding
Source: ACMA, Location Services, 2012,
http://www.acma.gov.au/webwr/_...
Digital life in 2025. Net Threats
1. Actions by nation-states to maintain security and political
control will lead to more...
Protective measures?
“I remember the first time a student sent me a Facebook
friend request. In considering how to answer,...
Responsibility?
Government
Online entities
Parents
School
Individual
 In the Digital Australians research the respective roles of industry and
government in protecting children online were e...
Citizenship -“the quality of an
individual’s response to membership
in a community.”
What is your definition of digital
citizenship?
 Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible
behaviour with regard to technology use.
Or
...
Year 8
2010
Domain 1: DIGITAL CONDUCT
Domain 2: DIGITAL FOOTPRINT
Domain 3: DIGITAL RELATIONSHIPS
Domain 5: DIGITAL LAW
Domain 4: DIGI...
Digital citizenship – 9 elements
1. Digital access - full electronic participation in society.
2. Digital commerce - elect...
21st century citizenship
A 21st century citizen is:
 Informed, engaged and active
 Literate in civics
 Proficient in co...
Preparing for a global and unknown
future
 The Australian Curriculum has Digital
Citizenship (DC) as a concept and sub
ca...
Purpose of DC for learning
Authentic learning needs a safe environment and trusting
relationships
Authentic learning is ex...
Curriculum
Subject
content
Learning
processes
Digital Learning
Digital
literacy
Transliteracy
Digital Citizenship
Cybersaf...
What do schools need?
 An understanding and agreement as to the
definition of digital citizenship for the local
community...
Next steps
1. Engage positively
2. Know your online world
3. Choose consciously
Some resources
Cyber bullying an issue for sport
https://secure.ausport.gov.au/sports_coach/technology2/cyber_bullying_an_...
My contact details
june@junewall.com.au
Twitter @junewall
http://www.slideshare.net/junewal
l/
Digital citizenship @ your school
Digital citizenship @ your school
Digital citizenship @ your school
Digital citizenship @ your school
Digital citizenship @ your school
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What is the purpose of a digital citizenship program? Who is the audience in schools - teachers, parents, students? This presentation looks at some of the research and discusses the factors to consider when developing a digital citizenship program for your school.

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  • With rapidly evolving technologies and services, it is difficult to keep up with the implications, as well as the potential threats. Scams and online fraud are becoming more sophisticated – and target businesses as well as individuals.

    There is no ‘set and forget’ in developing consumer education.
    For example, recently the ACMA commissioned community research to explore Australians concerns and understanding of the risks associated with the use of location services – there is a vast array of commercial applications and tools which use people’s location to add value and provide tailored information or services to users. These services are growing in popularity, especially among smartphone users and there are currently few guidelines or consumer safeguards in place.

    Our research with location services users found that greater use of location services (either more often or accessing a wider range of services) does not equate to a greater understanding of these services, as shown in the slide.

    Interest in and understanding of personal information security was relatively low and appeared to remain static, despite increased time exposed to Location Services. At the same time, our quantitative research found there was considerable concern amongst users about data security and the security of personal information when accessing services. Ultimately, despite their concerns, the desire to obtain the Location Service outweighed the risks and any conditions attached to downloading the service.


  • The program is based on six domains and two cross-domain themes. It covers safety, security and the law, as well as positive online roles and relationships.

    These have been developed by the Department of Education and Training as part of the Digital Education Revolution – NSW.

    More detailed information on the domains can be explored in a Prezi, available from: http://prezi.com/cesxdf3f-f8q/shifting-from-cyber-bully-to-digital-citizen/
    and at http://www.digitalcitizenship.nsw.edu.au/Sec_Splash/documents/domains_and_themes.pdf
  • Digital citizenship @ your school

    1. 1. Digital Citizenship @ your school June Wall Consultant in eLearning and Libraries
    2. 2. Overview of webinars 1. Digital Citizenship @ your school.  What is the purpose of Digital Citizenship in the context of learning and safe and ethical use of technologies in schools. Who is the Digital Citizenship for – students, staff, parents or everyone? 2. Tools, strategies and resources for digital citizenship.  Engaging teaching resources and strategies 3. Designing a digital citizenship program.  Explore how to design a digital citizenship program for your school.
    3. 3. A 2010 ACMA research report, Australia in the digital economy: The shift to the online environment, shows the internet is becoming increasingly important in the daily lives of Australians. More than 70 per cent of those aged 14 to 17 now spend more than seven hours online each week, while one in three aged over 14 years is online for more than 15 hours each week.
    4. 4. Aussie Teens Online 2014 http://www.acma.gov.au/theACMA/engage-blogs/engage-blogs/Research-snapshots/Aussie-teens- online
    5. 5. Aussie Teens Online 2014  89% have a mobile phone  69 per cent of mobile phone users have a smartphone  56 per cent use their mobile phone to go online  72 per cent go online more than once a day
    6. 6. Aussie Teens Online 2014 Since December 2009, the proportion of teenage internet users has:  declined by four percentage points at home and by six percentage points at library locations  increased by 11 percentage points at work and by 13 percentage points at wireless hotspot locations
    7. 7. Greater use does not equate to greater understanding Source: ACMA, Location Services, 2012, http://www.acma.gov.au/webwr/_assets/main/lib310665/location_services_research.pdf
    8. 8. Digital life in 2025. Net Threats 1. Actions by nation-states to maintain security and political control will lead to more blocking, filtering, segmentation, and balkanization of the Internet. 2. Trust will evaporate in the wake of revelations about government and corporate surveillance and likely greater surveillance in the future. 3. Commercial pressures affecting everything from Internet architecture to the flow of information will endanger the open structure of online life. 4. Efforts to fix the TMI (too much information) problem might over-compensate and actually thwart content sharinghttp://www.pewinternet.org/files/2014/07/Future-of-the-Internet_Net- Threats_070314.pdf
    9. 9. Protective measures? “I remember the first time a student sent me a Facebook friend request. In considering how to answer, I was not concerned about what he might learn about me. I am very conservative about what I share on Facebook and even personal comments are not very personal. Instead, I was concerned about what I might learn about him. Although I have not had a problem with students whose friend requests I have accepted, I am sure that most of my student friends are not aware that I am legally required to report certain incidents if they share them in an on-line post—even if they consider the post to be private or for “friends only.” “ Steven Berghttp://www.hastac.org/blogs/steven-l-berg/2013/08/04/high-cost-digital-illiteracy
    10. 10. Responsibility? Government Online entities Parents School Individual
    11. 11.  In the Digital Australians research the respective roles of industry and government in protecting children online were explored. Participants were clear that protecting children from accessing inappropriate or unsuitable content online is particularly important. While many saw this as the primary responsibility of parents, participants thought there was also a responsibility for both content service providers and government.  In earlier research with parents, the majority preferred to receive cybersafety information from a government agency, or source it themselves through an internet search. Around one third of parents reported that a government agency or an internet search were their preferred first line source of cybersafety information.
    12. 12. Citizenship -“the quality of an individual’s response to membership in a community.”
    13. 13. What is your definition of digital citizenship?
    14. 14.  Digital citizenship can be defined as the norms of appropriate, responsible behaviour with regard to technology use. Or  “The quality of habits, actions, and consumption patterns that impact the ecology of digital content and communities.” Or  Digital Citizenship is the concept of educating students (and all technology users) about how to use technology appropriately. This involves using technology effectively and not misusing it to disadvantage others. Digital Citizenship consists of numerous themes including appropriate online etiquette, literacy in how digital technology works and how to use it, an understanding of ethics and the law as it relates to technology, knowing how to stay safe online, and advice on health issues relating to the use of technology. Or  “Digital citizenship isn’t just about recognising and dealing with online hazards. It’s about building safe spaces and communities, understanding how to manage personal information, and about being internet savvy - using your online presence to grow and shape your world in a safe, creative way, and inspiring others to do the same.” digizen.org
    15. 15. Year 8 2010
    16. 16. Domain 1: DIGITAL CONDUCT Domain 2: DIGITAL FOOTPRINT Domain 3: DIGITAL RELATIONSHIPS Domain 5: DIGITAL LAW Domain 4: DIGITAL HEALTH AND WELLBEING Domain 6: DIGITAL FINANCIAL LITERACY Crossdomaintheme2:CYBERBULLYING Crossdomaintheme1:CYBERSAFETY The domains of digital citizenship
    17. 17. Digital citizenship – 9 elements 1. Digital access - full electronic participation in society. 2. Digital commerce - electronic buying and selling of goods. 3. Digital communication - electronic exchange of information. 4. Digital literacy - process of teaching and learning about technology and the use of technology. 5. Digital etiquette - electronic standards of conduct or procedure. 6. Digital law - electronic responsibility for actions and deeds 7. Digital rights & responsibilities - those freedoms extended to everyone in a digital world. 8. Digital health & wellness - physical and psychological well- being in a digital technology world. 9. Digital security - electronic precautions to guarantee safety. http://www.digitalcitizenship.net/Nine_Elements.html
    18. 18. 21st century citizenship A 21st century citizen is:  Informed, engaged and active  Literate in civics  Proficient in core academic subjects and interdisciplinary knowledge, such environmental literacy; financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy; and health literacy  Empowered with global competencies and 21st century skills  Capable of participating safely, intelligently, productively and responsibly in the digital world
    19. 19. Preparing for a global and unknown future  The Australian Curriculum has Digital Citizenship (DC) as a concept and sub categories within DC across the General Capabilities and the Digital Technologies curriculum
    20. 20. Purpose of DC for learning Authentic learning needs a safe environment and trusting relationships Authentic learning is experiential learning located in settings that reflect complex real world problems. It is characterized by:  Situated learning contexts within which the application of knowledge and skills may be demonstrated  Tasks with ill defined real world problems  Sustained investigation (i.e., time and effort) to arrive at solutions  Scenarios with multiple roles and perspectives and where expert performances and processes are modeled (i.e., making tacit knowledge explicit)  Collaborative activities to produce real world 'products' or 'performances'  Reflective practice (as a basis for professional learning)  Scaffolding and coaching at critical times. Assessment of authentic learning should be seamlessly integrated with a learning activity that is practical, realistic and challenging.http://otl.curtin.edu.au/teaching_learning_practice/student_centred/authentic.cf m
    21. 21. Curriculum Subject content Learning processes Digital Learning Digital literacy Transliteracy Digital Citizenship Cybersafety Global citizenship
    22. 22. What do schools need?  An understanding and agreement as to the definition of digital citizenship for the local community  Policy  Who is the audience?  How will digital citizenship be delivered?  Separate program?  Embedded in specific curriculum or across curriculum?  What is needed for teachers?  Resources  Professional learning Teachers Parents Students Program Policy Embedded
    23. 23. Next steps 1. Engage positively 2. Know your online world 3. Choose consciously
    24. 24. Some resources Cyber bullying an issue for sport https://secure.ausport.gov.au/sports_coach/technology2/cyber_bullying_an_issue_for _sport Check out http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com.au/2011/08/discover-what-your- digital-footprint.html www.acma.gov.au/theACMA/engage-blogs/engage-blogs/Cybersmart/Cultivating- Digital-Citizenship-Together Cyber smart http://www.cybersmart.gov.au/cybersmart-citizens.aspx
    25. 25. My contact details june@junewall.com.au Twitter @junewall http://www.slideshare.net/junewal l/

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