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Carl Roger

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PRESENTATION

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Carl Roger

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  2. 2. TOPIC OF PRESENTATION CARL ROGER 1902-1989 2
  3. 3. Carl Roger was born january8, 1902 in a small suburb of oak park Illinois, outside Chicago. He was forth of six children's. 3
  4. 4. When Roger was Teenager his family moved to a form in Glen Ellen, Illinois. This is where he interested in science of agriculture. 4
  5. 5. Graduated from “ Wisconsin of Madison University”. After Graduation he got married his long time girlfriend Helen & they had a son and a daughter. 5
  6. 6. Later on he developed his interest in taking classes in field of psychology in collage of Columbia university. 6
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  8. 8.  Humanistic psychology  Theory of personality a. Concept of Real & Ideal self b. Assumption of fully functional individual c. Incongruence leads to neurosis 8
  9. 9. THE PAST HAS ITS CHARMS! BUT NOTHING NEW EVER HAPPENS THERE… 9
  10. 10. NOTHING IN THE WORLD IS BIGGER THAN PEOPLE Except a Person 10
  11. 11.  “An individual’s unique and relatively consistent patterns of thinking, feeling, and behaving”  The psychoanalytic perspective – emphasizes the importance of unconscious processes and early childhood experiences ψThe humanistic perspective – represents an optimistic look at human nature, emphasizing the self and the fulfillment of a person’s unique potential  The social cognitive perspective – emphasizing learning and conscious cognitive processes  The trait perspective – emphasizes the description and measurement of specific personality differences among individuals 11
  12. 12. 1956 Maslow initiated gathering to discuss papers - that later on, shaped into Association of Humanistic psychology Humans are capable of their innate drives This view of personality emphasizes human potential and such uniquely human characteristics as self- awareness and free will (Rogers, 2004 ). 12
  13. 13.  Humanistic psychologists contended that the most important factor in personality is the individual’s conscious, subjective perception of his or her self 13
  14. 14.  According to Rogers, The most basic human motive is the actualizing tendency “The innate drive to maintain and enhance the human organism.” (Rogers, 1961) The cornerstone of Roger’s personality theory is the idea of the self-concept “The set of perceptions and beliefs that you hold about yourself” 14
  15. 15.  Self-concept: How I see myself  As infants grow, they develop the need for positive regard  Positive regard: Acceptance, love and approval from others  Child does not receive positive regard: fails to develop actualizing tendency fully 15
  16. 16.  Ideal Self – what the person is striving to become.  Real Self – what the person is. The further the ideal self is from the real self, the more alienated and maladjusted persons become. 16
  17. 17. As children develop a greater sense of self-awareness, there is an increasing need for positive regard “The sense of being valued and loved by other people”  Rogers argued that most parents provide their children with Conditional Positive Regard “The sense that the child is valued and loved only when the child behaves in a way that is acceptable to others” INCONGRUENCE – a state in which a child’s self-concept conflicts with his or her actual experience  Unconditional positive regard – the child’s sense of being unconditionally loved and valued, “Even if she doesn’t conform to the standards and expectations of others”  " 17
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  19. 19.  Self-Concept  “How I see me” Lonely Angry Fearful Smart Manipulative Compulsive Ideal self “How I should be” Joyful Insecure Lonely Honest Distrusting Smart Incongruence 19
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  21. 21.  Carl Rogers (1959) believed that humans have one basic motive, that is the tendency to self-actualize - i.e. to fulfill one's potential and achieve the highest level of 'human- beingness' we can. Like a flower that will grow to its full potential if the conditions are right, but which is constrained by its environment, so people will flourish and reach their potential if their environment is good enough.  This means that self-actualization occurs when a person’s (Real self) (i.e. who they would like to be) is congruent with their actual behavior (ideal self). Rogers describes an individual who is actualizing as a fully functioning person. The main determinant of whether we will become self- actualized is childhood experience. 21
  22. 22. PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT 22
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