Welcome LPEC Students!<br />Please:<br /><ul><li>Make a name tent
Take a handful of M&Ms</li></ul>We will start soon…<br />
Name You Want Me to Call You<br />Three M&Ms (color coded answers)<br />Goal you Have for the Semester<br />Red: Favorite ...
ED 276A Leadership Seminar September 11-12 <br />Leaders and Power<br />
When you think about the word power in relation to people, what first comes to mind? <br />Take a moment and write down th...
<ul><li>Power defined as: The potential of an individual to influence another individual or group
People exercise power to change attitudes and behaviors of others
Power and conflict inevitable in organizations
Powerlessness also corrupts</li></ul>Linda Hill: Power Dynamics in Organizations<br />
Political Conflict in OrganizationsHill, L. Power Dyanamics in Organizations<br />Precipitating Factors:<br /><ul><li>Crisis
Void in Authority
Formation of competing coalitions</li></ul>Sources of Political Conflict<br /><ul><li>Diversity
Interdependence
Competition for scarce resources</li></ul>Prevention Factors<br /><ul><li>Thick culture of shared value
Leadership
Capacity to resolve conflict</li></ul>Action of Key Players<br />Creativity and Innovation<br />Political Infighting<br />
Sources of Positional Power:<br />
Sources of Personal Power<br />
<ul><li>Is it effective for the individual?
Is it effective for the organization?
Is it ethical?</li></ul>Linda Hill<br />Assessing Individual Power and Influence	<br />
Distinguishes leaders and managers<br />Need a balance between leadership and management within organizations (and ideally...
Kotter: Leaders vs Manager<br />
<ul><li>Challenge early in career involving risk and willingness to learn from triumphs and failures
Broadening experiences and networks
Developmentally appropriate mentoring and coaching</li></ul>What makes leaders?<br />
It is helpful to think about yourself along the dimensions of leadership and management. Which is dominant in you?<br />Th...
Within your organization, is your power personal and/or positional?<br />What qualities describe your power?<br />Final Re...
The most successful organizations will be “learning organizations.”<br />Work must become more learningful.<br />Peter Sen...
<ul><li>Assertion: Organizations are healthy when learning occurs
Learning organizations are those that tap people’s commitment to learn at all levels and positions within the organization
Learning organizations are created
Discipline: Developmental path for acquiring skills and knowledge
An approach or disposition towards knowledge construction and relationships, *NOT* best practices or emulating a model</li...
5 Disciplines as Ensemble<br />Personal Mastery<br />Mental Models<br />Building Shared Vision<br />Team Learning<br />Sys...
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Ed 276 A, Month #1, Sept 11 12

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Ed 276 A, Month #1, Sept 11 12

  1. 1. Welcome LPEC Students!<br />Please:<br /><ul><li>Make a name tent
  2. 2. Take a handful of M&Ms</li></ul>We will start soon…<br />
  3. 3. Name You Want Me to Call You<br />Three M&Ms (color coded answers)<br />Goal you Have for the Semester<br />Red: Favorite hobbies <br />Green: Favorite foods <br />Yellow: Favorite movies <br />Orange: Favorite places to travel <br />Brown: Meaningful experience from the summer <br />Blue: Wild card (interesting fact about you)<br />INTRODUCTIONS<br />
  4. 4. ED 276A Leadership Seminar September 11-12 <br />Leaders and Power<br />
  5. 5. When you think about the word power in relation to people, what first comes to mind? <br />Take a moment and write down the first words that come to mind<br />POWER<br />
  6. 6. <ul><li>Power defined as: The potential of an individual to influence another individual or group
  7. 7. People exercise power to change attitudes and behaviors of others
  8. 8. Power and conflict inevitable in organizations
  9. 9. Powerlessness also corrupts</li></ul>Linda Hill: Power Dynamics in Organizations<br />
  10. 10. Political Conflict in OrganizationsHill, L. Power Dyanamics in Organizations<br />Precipitating Factors:<br /><ul><li>Crisis
  11. 11. Void in Authority
  12. 12. Formation of competing coalitions</li></ul>Sources of Political Conflict<br /><ul><li>Diversity
  13. 13. Interdependence
  14. 14. Competition for scarce resources</li></ul>Prevention Factors<br /><ul><li>Thick culture of shared value
  15. 15. Leadership
  16. 16. Capacity to resolve conflict</li></ul>Action of Key Players<br />Creativity and Innovation<br />Political Infighting<br />
  17. 17. Sources of Positional Power:<br />
  18. 18. Sources of Personal Power<br />
  19. 19. <ul><li>Is it effective for the individual?
  20. 20. Is it effective for the organization?
  21. 21. Is it ethical?</li></ul>Linda Hill<br />Assessing Individual Power and Influence <br />
  22. 22. Distinguishes leaders and managers<br />Need a balance between leadership and management within organizations (and ideally in leaders/managers as individuals)<br />Often organizations over managed, under led<br />Leadership and management are distinctive and complimentary<br />Kotter: What Leaders Really Do<br />
  23. 23. Kotter: Leaders vs Manager<br />
  24. 24. <ul><li>Challenge early in career involving risk and willingness to learn from triumphs and failures
  25. 25. Broadening experiences and networks
  26. 26. Developmentally appropriate mentoring and coaching</li></ul>What makes leaders?<br />
  27. 27. It is helpful to think about yourself along the dimensions of leadership and management. Which is dominant in you?<br />Think about the head of your organization. Are they more one or the other, a good balance? Are there a couple of people who share the role?<br />Personal Reflection: Leaders and Managers <br />
  28. 28. Within your organization, is your power personal and/or positional?<br />What qualities describe your power?<br />Final Reflection<br />
  29. 29. The most successful organizations will be “learning organizations.”<br />Work must become more learningful.<br />Peter Senge: The Fifth Discipline<br />
  30. 30. <ul><li>Assertion: Organizations are healthy when learning occurs
  31. 31. Learning organizations are those that tap people’s commitment to learn at all levels and positions within the organization
  32. 32. Learning organizations are created
  33. 33. Discipline: Developmental path for acquiring skills and knowledge
  34. 34. An approach or disposition towards knowledge construction and relationships, *NOT* best practices or emulating a model</li></ul>Peter Senge’sFifth Discipline<br />
  35. 35. 5 Disciplines as Ensemble<br />Personal Mastery<br />Mental Models<br />Building Shared Vision<br />Team Learning<br />Systems Thinking: 5th Discipline drives and unifies<br />
  36. 36. Proficiency<br />Taking a learning stance, commitment to own lifelong learning<br />Deepening personal vision (self-knowing, clarity, authenticity)<br />Reflective versus reactive (mindfulness)<br />Rare<br />Personal Mastery<br />
  37. 37. Assumptions, values and beliefs that shape our understanding and perception of the world. <br />“Filters” for knowledge construction that keep us from having new insights<br />Dispositions for Inquiry<br />Self-knowing and Reflectivity<br />Learning to accept Disequilibrium and Uncertainty. Opening up to new thinking<br />(think of Rogoff and Gonzalez-Mena’s work in ECE)<br />Mental Models<br />
  38. 38. Goals and values that are shared across an organization…not just the leaders<br />United visions or “pictures” of the future, collective mission<br />Commitment to the long term<br />Not forced compliance<br />Building Shared Vision<br />
  39. 39. Starts with dialogue, “thinking together”<br />Suspending assumptions and defenses, all become aware of what undermines learning<br />Key is looking for a “larger picture” beyond any individual perspective<br />Team Learning<br />
  40. 40. We tend to focus on “snapshots” of isolated parts of a system (islands and silos)<br />Seeing ourselves as part of a larger system “The whole”…connected versus separate<br />Learning to think about consequences of our actions (or in-actions)<br />Systems Thinking<br />
  41. 41. <ul><li>I am my position
  42. 42. The enemy is out there
  43. 43. The illusion of taking charge
  44. 44. The fixation of events
  45. 45. The parable of the boiled frog
  46. 46. The delusion of learning from experience
  47. 47. The myth of the management team </li></ul>Organizational Learning Disability<br />
  48. 48. <ul><li>Trait Theory
  49. 49. Behavioral Theory
  50. 50. Contingency Theory
  51. 51. Inspirational Theory</li></ul> Charismatic Leadership<br /> Transformative Leadership<br />Leadership Theories<br />
  52. 52. Big Five (predictive)<br /><ul><li>Extroversion* (includes ambition and energy)
  53. 53. Conscientiousness*
  54. 54. Openness to new experiences*
  55. 55. Agreeableness
  56. 56. Emotional Stability</li></ul>Newer Theories: Emotional Intelligence (empathy)<br />Trait theory helpful for leadership identification—emergence and appearance of leaders—but does not identify who will be effective as a leader<br />Trait Theory (Who You Are)<br />
  57. 57. Ohio State Studies<br /><ul><li>Initiating structure (organizing work, well-defined tasks, goals and deadlines)
  58. 58. Consideration (mutual trust, respect for employee ideas, regard for feelings)</li></ul>University of Michigan Studies<br /><ul><li>Employee-oriented (interpersonal emphasis)
  59. 59. Production-oriented (task oriented)</li></ul>Behavioral Theory (What You Do and How Well it Works)<br />
  60. 60. <ul><li>Fiedler Model
  61. 61. Leaders-Member Exchange Theory (LMXO)
  62. 62. Path-Goal Theory (Robert House)</li></ul>Contingency Theories(Depends on the Situation)<br />
  63. 63. <ul><li>Establishes leadership style using Least Preferred Coworker Questionnaire
  64. 64. Assumes leadership style fixed (change the leader to fit the situation, change the situation to fit the leader)
  65. 65. Assesses style in terms of</li></ul>Leader-member relations<br />Task structure<br />Position power<br />Fiedler Contingency Model<br />
  66. 66. Leaders relationships not all the same due to time, establishes a special group with some<br />In-group and out-group categorized and relationships stable over time<br />Based on personality characteristics and competence<br />In group members higher performance ratings, lower turnover intentions, greater satisfaction with supervisors, and higher overall satisfaction<br />Leader-Member Exchange Theory (Contingency)<br />
  67. 67. Robbins and Judge, Chap 11 Leadership<br />The Path-Goal Theory (Contingency)<br />Environmental Contingency Factors<br /><ul><li>Task structure
  68. 68. Formal Authority System
  69. 69. Work Group</li></ul>Outcomes<br /><ul><li>Performance
  70. 70. Satisfaction</li></ul>Leader Behavior<br /><ul><li>Directive
  71. 71. Supportive
  72. 72. Participative
  73. 73. Achievement Oriented</li></ul>Subordinate Contingency Factors<br /><ul><li>Locus of Control
  74. 74. Experience
  75. 75. Perceived Ability</li></li></ul><li><ul><li>Vision, willingness to take personal risks to achieve vision
  76. 76. Sensitivity to followers’ needs and exhibits extraordinary behaviors
  77. 77. Articulates appealing vision, high performance expectations, sets new values by example, emotional contagion
  78. 78. Do-able (Yes We Can!)</li></ul>Charismatic Leadership (Inspirational) Theory<br />
  79. 79. Motivate their followers by guiding them in the direction of the established goals by clarifying role and task requirements.<br />Contingent Reward: Contracts exchange of rewards for effort, promises rewards for good performance, recognizes accomplishments.<br />Management by Exception: (active) Watches and searches for deviations from rules and standards, takes correct action.<br />Management by Exception: (passive) Intervenes only if standards are not met.<br />Laissez-Faire: Abdicates responsibilities, avoids making decisions.<br />Robbins and Judge, Chap. 11, Leadership<br />Transactional Leaders<br />
  80. 80. <ul><li>Pay attention to the concerns and needs of followers
  81. 81. Help followers look at problems in new ways
  82. 82. Excite and inspire followers to put out extra effort to achieve group goals
  83. 83. Encourage followers to be innovating and creative
  84. 84. Encourage followers to question established authority</li></ul>Robbins and Judge, Chap 11. Leadership<br />Transformational Leaders:<br />
  85. 85. <ul><li>Idealized Influence: Provides vision and sense of mission, instills pride, gains respect and trust.
  86. 86. Inspirational Motivation:Communicates high expectations, uses symbols to focus efforts, expresses important purposes in simple ways.
  87. 87. Intellectual Stimulation: Promotes intelligence, rationality, and careful problem-solving.
  88. 88. Individualized Consideration: Gives personal attention, treats each employee individually, coaches, advises.</li></ul>Robbins and Judge, Chap 11. Leadership<br />Transformational Leaders<br />
  89. 89. Full Range of Leadership Model<br />Effective<br />Transformational<br />Active<br />Passive<br />Ineffective<br />Transactional<br />Idealized Influence<br />Inspirational Motivation<br />Intellectual Stimulation<br />Individualized Consideration<br />Contingent Reward<br />Management by Exception<br />Laissez-faire<br />

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