Session 16 ic2011 schimleck

599 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
599
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Session 16 ic2011 schimleck

  1. 1. Measuring the moisture content of green hardwood  logs using time domain reflectometry H. Raybon1, L.R. Schimleck1, K. Love‐Myers1, J. Sanders1,  R.F. Daniels1 and E. Schilling2 1University of Georgia 2NCASI
  2. 2. Introduction: Wet decks • Many forest products companies store wood in  wet decks • Maintain steady wood supply when logging  productivity may decrease • Wood stored at high moisture content to  prevent degradation and maintain wood quality • Directional sprinklers deliver a constant supply  of water • In the SE USA the use of water has become an  important issue
  3. 3. Introduction: Wet decks
  4. 4. Introduction: Wet decks
  5. 5. Pine Calibration ‐77.52 + 98.64 x apparent distance
  6. 6. Hardwood calibration  • Hardwood wetdecks store a wide range of species • “Hard” hardwoods: red/white oaks, hickory • “Soft” hardwoods: black gum, red maple, sweetgum, yellow  poplar • Regional differences in the species stored Goals: • Determine whether TDR measurements can be used to  predict moisture contents of various hardwood species • Create a model or models to predict moisture content from  inflection point of TDR waveform
  7. 7. Hardwood calibration • Four hardwood species selected: sweetgum, yellow poplar, red oak,  white oak• Four logs of each species, three bolts  from each log (48 bolts involved)• Bolts fitted with TDR probes and  hydrated in tank for 1 month, then  allowed to air‐dry over 16 days (9  sets of measurements)• TDR readings taking at each weighing  interval• Samples oven dried, MC determined• Calibration curves developed
  8. 8. Yellow Poplar
  9. 9. Sweetgum
  10. 10. Red Oak
  11. 11. White Oak
  12. 12. Hardwood Calibration • Based on the sigmoidal shape, logistic  “growth” model was used α • The model is MC = 1 + exp{−κ ( x − γ )} α is the maximum moisture content γ is the inflection point of the curve,  located at the point where half the  maximum moisture content is obtained κ is related to the curvature of the model α and     vary randomly with the log/bolt to  γ help obtain better estimates
  13. 13. Yellow Poplar Calibration Plot
  14. 14. Sweetgum Calibration Plot
  15. 15. White Oak Calibration Plot
  16. 16. Red Oak Calibration Plot
  17. 17. Manipulative Studies • Two manipulative study sites • Offerman Woodyard near Blackshear, GA Rayonier • McBean Woodyard near Augusta, GA International Paper
  18. 18. Offerman Woodyard Treatments: • Two treatments – nominal and 30% reduction by  turning off the sprinklers two days per week • Actual rates not known at this time • Two replications of each treatment due to limited  space Species: • Due to availability in Flatwoods included: • Sweetgum ‐ 24 trees • Yellow poplar ‐ 24 trees
  19. 19. Offerman Woodyard
  20. 20. Offerman Woodyard
  21. 21. Offerman Woodyard
  22. 22. Offerman Woodyard
  23. 23. Offerman Woodyard Design•2 probes per tree•1 tree of each species in each position
  24. 24. Offerman woodyard • First readings taken in August 2010 during  installation, sprinklers turned on within a  week • Yellow poplar moisture unsteady, even falling  below the original levels • Sweetgum moisture generally increasing
  25. 25. Offerman First Plots• Unstable moisture content• Currently no treatment effect…treatments began as different avg moisture contents
  26. 26. Offerman First Plots• More stable moisture content• Currently no treatment effect…treatments began as different avg moisture contents
  27. 27. McBean Woodyard • Again, two treatments Nominal rate 30% reduction by turning off water 2 days per  week Actual rates not known at this time • Two replications • Two Species Sweetgum ‐ 24 trees Red oak ‐ 24 trees availability
  28. 28. Conclusions • TDR monitoring can be used to measure moisture  content successfully in hardwoods • Each species requires its own model • The model is partially determined by the maximum  moisture content of the species being monitored • TDR is applicable to measuring moisture content in  operational wetdecks
  29. 29. Acknowledgements • NCASI for providing funding for this study • International Paper and Rayonier for providing  study sites

×