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Literacy Menu

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Literacy Menu

  1. 1. Let’s Do Lunch: Using a menu of readingcomprehension strategies to plan effective lessons Penn State June 2012
  2. 2. Objectives• To deepen our understanding of the stages of the reading process: before, during, and after reading.• To enhance our understanding of how to support all levels of readers at all three stages.• Select appropriate strategy instruction for each stage of the reading process.• Flexibly use a menu of options to plan an effective lesson through all three stages of the reading process.
  3. 3. Deeper ReadingRead the text, and then answer thefollowing questions:1. What happened to Brown?2. What did Daniel do?3. How did the game end?4. Who won the game?
  4. 4. Time to correct your papers…1. Brown was pulled viciously into the gully.2. Daniel bowled a maiden over in his first spell.3. The game ended when McArdle dived at silly leg and everyone cried, “How’s that!”4. ?????
  5. 5. Planning Lessons toSupport ReadingComprehensionSequence your lesson involving content-area reading according to processing strategies:• Before• During• After
  6. 6. Time for an activity• With a partner, create a Word Splash on chart paper with words and phrases that you would associate with your stage of the reading process.• Add any activities you find successful for this stage of the reading process.• Be ready to share.
  7. 7. Literacy Lesson Planning Menu After Reading Desserts -Summarize and connect learning for long term memory - 25-word abstract During Reading Entrees Carousel Brainstorming - Support and Monitor Comprehension - Get the Gist Graphic Organizers Before Reading Appetizers Connections, Points, & Questions Journal responses Double/Triple Entry Journals Narrative Pyramid/Bio-Pyramid -Activate Prior Knowledge- Graphic Organizers Quick WritesAdmit slip Headings into Questions RACE technique—open-endedAnticipation Guides Highlighting/Coding the text responseKWL QAR RAFTSPrediction Word ScramblePreview the Text—THIEVES Question the Author (QtA) Reciprocal TeachingPreview/Preteach text structure Reciprocal Teaching SummarizingVocabulary Pre-teaching Scoring Comprehension Write Around/Silent DiscussionStrategies Word Splash -List-Group-Label-Write Support with Text Structures -Possible Sentences Sketch to Stretch/Visualizing -Word Sorts Talking to the Text -Word Walls Text frames -Concept Definition MapWeb Quests Think-aloud Bookmarks
  8. 8. Before ReadingTHIEVES – Teach your students to “steal” information from the text before reading.T – TitleH – HeadingsI – IntroductionE – Everything I know about the topicV – Visuals and vocabularyE – End of chapter/section questionsS – Summary (end of chapter)http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson- plans/using-thieves-preview-nonfiction-112.html
  9. 9. THIEVES• Use the sample U.S. History Chapter on Jamestown.• Use the THIEVES graphic organizer to help you to preview T-H-I-E-V-E-S.• Reflect: How would this help your students before reading?
  10. 10. Possible Sentences Before & After• Activates background knowledge of content concepts• Engages students with use of new or unfamiliar vocabulary• Develops the reading skill of prediction• Improves overall comprehension www.adlit.org
  11. 11. Possible Sentences• Model, Model, Model – Show students how to use two or more of vocabulary words you have pre-taught to create sentences.• Possible sentences should predict what the article MIGHT tell us about our topic.• During reading, highlight instances where the vocabulary words are used.• Revisit their possible sentences after reading to decide if they were TRUE or FALSE.• As an extension, have students rewrite the FALSE sentences so they are true.
  12. 12. Possible SentencesYOUR TURN…• Try writing two or three possible sentences.• What if your students need some extra scaffolding…• Crisis Example• Reflect…How does this strategy support comprehension?
  13. 13. Responding to a Text in Writing – The Open-ended Response• Do you ever assign essays or give essay questions on a test?• Are there other situations where students must be able to construct a written response?• What do students need to know and be able to do to write a quality essay or open-ended response?
  14. 14. RACE Technique• R – Read the question (and circle key words)• A - Answer the question as written (Flip the question to answer)• C Cite evidence from the text• E Explain your examples
  15. 15. RACE Technique• Teach and Model R-A-C-E steps.• Require the 6-8 sentence paragraph.• Use the graphic organizer at first until the organization becomes ingrained.
  16. 16. After ReadingBenefits of the RACE Technique• Synthesize and process information in the text for retention• Practices valuable skills of responding to open-ended prompts• Develops writing skills
  17. 17. Deeper Reading “As their teacher, I am the determining factor when it comes to how deeply my students will comprehend.” How can we move our students to the deepest levels of comprehension?
  18. 18. During ReadingScoring the Text0 = No understanding!10 = I am an expert!
  19. 19. During ReadingColor-coding the TextYellow = I understandPink = I don’t “get it”
  20. 20. BenefitsBenefits of Scoring and Color-coding• Provides the reader with a focus during reading.• Motivates the reader to concentrate.• Shows the reader visually where to speed up or slow his pace.• Alerts the reader to the importance of context in trying to make meaning.• Encourages the reader to “revise” his comprehension while reading. Kelly Gallagher – Deeper Reading
  21. 21. After ReadingMost of the …• Synthesizing and Summarizing,• Connecting,• Analyzing, and Evaluatingtakes place in the After Reading stage!
  22. 22. After ReadingTeach students to use after reading strategies by involving them with…• Discussion• Summarizing/Synthesizing• Writing to Learn activities
  23. 23. Benefits of Summarizing• Essential to reading comprehension (fiction and nonfiction)• Helps students learn to focus on the main ideas in the content.• Helps with succinct note taking.• Helps students to be responsible researchers of content material.• Teaches students to be good readers, and efficient writers of social studies, science, etc.
  24. 24. After Reading – Get the Gist Can you get the GIST of it? • Read the article. • Highlight or circle and record three key words from each paragraph on your graphic organizer. • Think about the 5 W’s + H (who, what, when, where, why, and how). • Write a brief summary in your own words, using the key words you circled plus your own words.
  25. 25. After Reading – 25 Word AbstractPROCEDURE:• Complete sentences.• Main ideas only.• “A, an, of, the” don’t count as part of your word count.• 24-26 words. No more, no less.• You must do a practice first, revise it, and then complete the final copy.• Total your word count.
  26. 26. Your Turn• Choose one of the summarizing strategies• Try the Anticipation Guide for the article• Read the Vitamin D article• Try out the strategy• Meet with someone who chose the other strategy and compare your summaries.• What are the benefits of these strategies?
  27. 27. Planning a lesson with text
  28. 28. Literacy Lesson Planning Menu After Reading Desserts -Summarize and connect learning for long term memory - 25-word abstract During Reading Entrees Carousel Brainstorming - Support and Monitor Comprehension - Get the Gist Graphic Organizers Before Reading Appetizers Connections, Points, & Questions Journal responses Double/Triple Entry Journals Narrative Pyramid/Bio-Pyramid -Activate Prior Knowledge- Graphic Organizers Quick WritesAdmit slip Headings into Questions RACE technique—open-endedAnticipation Guides Highlighting/Coding the text responseKWL QAR RAFTSPrediction Word ScramblePreview the Text—THIEVES Question the Author (QtA) Reciprocal TeachingPreview/Preteach text structure Reciprocal Teaching SummarizingVocabulary Pre-teaching Scoring Comprehension Write Around/Silent DiscussionStrategies Word Splash -List-Group-Label-Write Support with Text Structures -Possible Sentences Sketch to Stretch/Visualizing -Word Sorts Talking to the Text -Word Walls Text frames -Concept Definition MapWeb Quests Think-aloud Bookmarks
  29. 29. Reading Comprehension Websites for Teachers• www.readwritethink.org• http://www.adlit.org/• www.readingquest.org• www.readinglady.com• www.readingrockets.org
  30. 30. Thank you!If you have anyquestions or needadditionalresources, feel free tocontact me.Shari.young@dallastown.net

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