Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data:
Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und
Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten könn...
Markus Hametner, Noura Maan, Cornelius Puschmann, Julian Ausserhofer
(Online-)Kommunikation dieser Bewegungen
‣Themen
‣Quellen
‣Verbindungen in Europa und/oder zu Parteien
Forschungsinteresse
Methoden
Methoden
Output
Quellen im PEGIDA-Diskurs
‣Links aus 140.000 Tweets zu
“pegida”, “#pegida" und
"#nopegida" extrahiert
‣Quellen und User
ka...
Pro-Pegida UK
Pro-Pegida
Deutschland
Con-Pegida
(Puschmann, Ausserhofer, Maan, & Hametner, 2016)
(Maan&Schmidt,2016a,2016b)
Die Themen von anti-
islamischen Bewegungen
‣3.400 Posts, 415.000 Kommentare &
1.460.000 Likes der Pegida-Facebookseite
‣ ...
Die Themen von anti-islamischen Bewegungen
(Puschmann,Ausserhofer,Hametner,&Maan,2016)
bürger
0.00.20.40.60.81.0
familie−f...
Zwischenresümee
Screenshot: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/interactive/2011/dec/07/london-riots-twitter(Dant & Richards, 201...
1821
(Manchester) Guardian
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2011/09/25/ManchesterGuardianbackfull...
Wetterreporter
Screenshot: http://tvthek.orf.atScreenshot: http://www.zdf.de/ZDFmediathek#/
Was bringt eine solche datenintensive Zusammenarbeit
für Wissenschaft und Journalismus?
‣Austausch über gemeinsame Fragest...
Was bringt eine solche datenintensive Zusammenarbeit
der Wissenschaft?
‣Regelmäßige Medienpräsenz und größere
Medienaufmer...
Herausforderungen
‣Wissenschaftliche Relevanz vs. Nachrichtenwert
‣Komplexitätsanspruch vs. -reduktion
‣Zusammenarbeit in ...
Was kann die Hochschulkommunikation für eine 

bessere Zusammenarbeit zwischen Datenjournalismus
und Wissenschaft tun?
3. ...
‣1. Datenintensive Kooperationen initiieren
‣2. Open Science unterstützen
2. Open Science
Offenlegung von…
‣Methoden
‣Educational Resources
‣Quellcode
‣Forschungsdaten
(Ausserhofer, i.E.; Kasberge...
2. Open Research Data
‣Standards und Gütekriterien, die u.a.
Formate, Lizenzen, Metadaten &
Schnittstellen regeln, z.B. da...
2. Open Research Data
Screenshot: https://github.com/OKFNat/data/blob/master/asyl/asylantraege.csv
‣GitHub
2. Open Research Data
Screenshot: https://zenodo.org/record/50024
‣3. Open Data in der Hochschule
3. Open Data an einer Hochschule
‣Standorte, Öffnungszeiten
‣Wissensbilanz, Jahresberichte
‣Telefonbuch
‣Stundenpläne
‣Men...
Ausblick
‣Datenintensive Kooperationen bringen Vorteile für
Wissenschaft und Journalismus
‣Größte Herausforderung der Koop...
Ausblick
🎉
Forschungsservices
Hochschulkommunikation
Daten
Wording Strategie
Wissenschaft
Vielen Dank!
Julian Ausserhofer (@julauss / julian.ausserhofer@hiig.de)



Universität Göttingen, 15.09.16

#allesdigital,...
Universität Göttingen, 15.09.16

#allesdigital, Jahrestagung des Bundesverbands Hochschulkommunikation

Workshop „Datenjou...
Referenzen 1
Ausserhofer, J. (i.E.). Die Datenbank verdient die Hauptrolle: Bausteine einer Methodologie für Open Digital
...
Referenzen 2
Puschmann, C., Ausserhofer, J., Hametner, M., & Maan, N. (2016, Juli). What are the topics of populist anti-i...
Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data:  Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können
Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data:  Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können
Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data:  Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können
Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data:  Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können
Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data:  Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können
Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data:  Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data: Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können

2,981 views

Published on

Vortrag auf der Jahrestagung des Bundesverbands Hochschulkommunikation (#allesdigital)
Workshop „Datenjournalismus in der Hochschulkommunikation”
Donnerstag, 15.09.2016, 14:15 bis 15:45 Uhr

Ausgehend von den Erfahrungen in einem Kooperationsprojekt zwischen Datenjournalisten und Wissenschaftlern beschreibt dieser Vortrag auf sehr praktischer Ebene die Synergien zwischen Datenjournalismus, Wissenschaft und Hochschulkommunikation. Das Manuskript ist auf http://ausserhofer.net zu finden

Published in: Data & Analytics
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data: Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können

  1. 1. Empörungsnetzwerke, Open Science und Open Data: Wie Wissenschaft, Hochschul-PR und Datenjournalismus zusammenarbeiten können Julian Ausserhofer (@julauss),
 Cornelius Puschmann, Noura Maan & Markus Hametner
 
 Universität Göttingen, 15.09.16
 #allesdigital, Jahrestagung des Bundesverbands Hochschulkommunikation
 Workshop „Datenjournalismus in der Hochschulkommunikation”
  2. 2. Markus Hametner, Noura Maan, Cornelius Puschmann, Julian Ausserhofer
  3. 3. (Online-)Kommunikation dieser Bewegungen ‣Themen ‣Quellen ‣Verbindungen in Europa und/oder zu Parteien Forschungsinteresse
  4. 4. Methoden
  5. 5. Methoden
  6. 6. Output
  7. 7. Quellen im PEGIDA-Diskurs ‣Links aus 140.000 Tweets zu “pegida”, “#pegida" und "#nopegida" extrahiert ‣Quellen und User kategorisiert (Puschmann, Ausserhofer, Maan, & Hametner, 2016) Information Laundering and Counter-Publics: The News Sources of Islamophobic Groups on Twitter Cornelius Puschmann1 , Julian Ausserhofer1 , Noura Maan2 , Markus Hametner2 Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society, Französische Str. 9 10117 Berlin, Germany cornelius.puschmann@hiig.de, julian.ausserhofer@hiig.de Der Standard, Vordere Zollamtsstraße 13, 1030 Vienna, Austria noura.maan@derstandard.at, markus.hametner@derstandard.at Abstract Which news sources do supporters of populist islamophobic groups and their opponents rely on, and how are these sources related to each other? We explore these questions by studying the websites referenced in discussions sur- rounding Pegida, a right-wing populist movement based in Germany that is opposed to what its supporters regard as is- lamization, cultural marginalization and political correct- ness. We draw on a manual content analysis of the news sources and the stances of Twitter users, to then calculate the overlap of sources across audiences. Finally, we perform a cluster analysis of the resulting user groups, based on shared sources. Preferences by language, nationality, region and politics emerge, showing the distinction between differ- ent groups among the users. Our tentative findings have im- plications both for the study of mass media audiences through the lens of social media, and for research on the public sphere and its possible fragmentation in online dis- course. This contribution, which is the result of an interdis- ciplinary collaboration between communication scholars in Germany and journalists in Austria, is part of a larger ongo- ing effort to understand forms of online extremism through the analysis of social media data. Keywords: populism, islamophobia, Twitter, altmedia Introduction Debates on controversial political issues, such as immigra- tion policy and climate change, frequently revolve around the choice of news sources. Right-wing populists thrive on polarized discourses that allow them to mobilize their sup- porters in opposition to "politically-correct" liberal elites that are presumed to control the media (Allen, 2011, Dan- iels, 2009, Padovani, 2008). In such debates, mainstream and populist factions often draw on markedly different repertoires of news sources, leading some scholars to assert the existence of echo chambers shaped by ideological dif- Copyright © 2016, Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelli- gence (www.aaai.org). All rights reserved. ferences (Pariser, 2011; Vicario et al., 2016). Social media such as Facebook and Twitter are particularly suitable to rally support for populist stances, as not all sources pro- moted through them conform with journalistic standards of careful sourcing, editorial balance, and factual accuracy. In addition to the websites of traditional media organiza- tions, such as private and public broadcasters as well as newspaper publishers, social media audiences draw on a range of non-traditional media actors that rely exclusively on the Internet. The ownership structure of many of these organizations is opaque. Many are supported by a variety of unusual sources of revenue, including reliance on direct state sponsorship, private patronage, and the free labor supplied by volunteer contributors. These actors increas- ingly disseminate information in foreign languages to reach audiences abroad. Examples for this strategy are RT (previously Russia Today) and Sputnik, both of which are financed by the Russian government, and Epoch Times, widely assumed to be influenced by Falun Gong, a group of spiritual practitioners with origins in China. The aims of these actors include influencing the public agenda, for example by fostering support for the Russian government and opposition to the European Union, or promoting a socially conservative world-view in accord- ance with the teachings of Falun Gong, while some sites also seek to maximize advertising-based revenues through particularly incendiary headlines. In addition to these or- ganizations, a number of other non-institutionalized sources of news and opinion, such as partisan blogs and populist grass-roots initiatives also feature prominently in controversial discourses on social media platforms. Taken together, the availability of these sources enables what Klein (2012) refers to as ‘information laundering’, that is, the legitimization of xenophobic and islamophobic atti- tudes through the guise of legitimate sources. Based on these observations, we formulate the following three re- search questions: The Workshops of the Tenth International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media Social Media in the Newroom: Technical Report WS-16-19 143
  8. 8. Pro-Pegida UK Pro-Pegida Deutschland Con-Pegida (Puschmann, Ausserhofer, Maan, & Hametner, 2016)
  9. 9. (Maan&Schmidt,2016a,2016b)
  10. 10. Die Themen von anti- islamischen Bewegungen ‣3.400 Posts, 415.000 Kommentare & 1.460.000 Likes der Pegida-Facebookseite ‣ Diskursverläufe und Themenkarrieren (Puschmann, Ausserhofer, Hametner, & Maan, 2016)
  11. 11. Die Themen von anti-islamischen Bewegungen (Puschmann,Ausserhofer,Hametner,&Maan,2016) bürger 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 familie−flüchtlinge−kinder−tochter 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 afd−frauen−islam−kinder 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 arbeiten−flüchtlinge−geld 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 flüchtlinge−geld−mann 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 politik−politiker−recht 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 linken−politiker−recht−wählen 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 flüchtlinge−pack−politik−politiker 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 krieg−putin−regierung−russland 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 frauen−köln−polizei 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 asylanten−grünen 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 geld−kinder−schule 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 flüchtlinge−politiker−regierung−ungarn 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 demo−dresden−lügenpresse−medien 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 afd−maas−partei−spd 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 europa−flüchtlinge 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 afd−europa−flüchtlinge−türkei 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 europa−islam−muslime−religion 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 dresden−grüße−stolz−super 0.00.20.40.60.81.0 islam 0.00.20.40.60.81.0
  12. 12. Zwischenresümee Screenshot: http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/interactive/2011/dec/07/london-riots-twitter(Dant & Richards, 2011) ‣Reading the Riots (Guardian & LSE) ‣lange, intensive Zusammenarbeit ist weitestgehend Neuland für Wissenschaft und Datenjournalismus
  13. 13. 1821 (Manchester) Guardian http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2011/09/25/ManchesterGuardianbackfull.jpg (Rogers, 2011) (Klein, 2016) 1806 The New York Evening Post
  14. 14. Wetterreporter Screenshot: http://tvthek.orf.atScreenshot: http://www.zdf.de/ZDFmediathek#/
  15. 15. Was bringt eine solche datenintensive Zusammenarbeit für Wissenschaft und Journalismus? ‣Austausch über gemeinsame Fragestellungen ‣Austausch über Methoden – Datengewinnung, Datenanalyse, Visualisierung, Dokumentation ‣Entwicklung und Programmierung von Tools ‣Kennenlernen anderer Arbeitsfelder und -anforderungen ‣Aufbaus eines Vertrauensverhältnisses (Ausserhofer, i.E.; Volkswagenstiftung, 2015; Weinacht & Spiller, 2013)
  16. 16. Was bringt eine solche datenintensive Zusammenarbeit der Wissenschaft? ‣Regelmäßige Medienpräsenz und größere Medienaufmerksamkeit ‣Co-Autorschaft bei journalistischen Veröffentlichungen dem Journalismus? ‣Erschließen komplexer Datenstrukturen ‣Co-Autorschaft bei wissenschaftlichen Veröffentlichungen (Ausserhofer, i.E.; Volkswagenstiftung, 2015; Weinacht & Spiller, 2013)
  17. 17. Herausforderungen ‣Wissenschaftliche Relevanz vs. Nachrichtenwert ‣Komplexitätsanspruch vs. -reduktion ‣Zusammenarbeit in Teams ‣Unterschiedliche Zeithorizonte für die Realisierung ‣Kosten, Administration und Verrechnung
  18. 18. Was kann die Hochschulkommunikation für eine 
 bessere Zusammenarbeit zwischen Datenjournalismus und Wissenschaft tun? 3. Vorschläge ‣1. Datenintensive Kooperationen initiieren ‣2. Open Science und Open Research Data unterstützen ‣3. Open Data in der Hochschule
  19. 19. ‣1. Datenintensive Kooperationen initiieren
  20. 20. ‣2. Open Science unterstützen
  21. 21. 2. Open Science Offenlegung von… ‣Methoden ‣Educational Resources ‣Quellcode ‣Forschungsdaten (Ausserhofer, i.E.; Kasberger, 2013; Kraker, Leony, Reinhardt, & Beham, 2011; Whyte & Pryor, 2011)
  22. 22. 2. Open Research Data ‣Standards und Gütekriterien, die u.a. Formate, Lizenzen, Metadaten & Schnittstellen regeln, z.B. dataprotocols.org ‣Rohdaten, prozessierte Daten, Erläuterungen über die Erhebung und Datenbearbeitungen ‣Die Hochschul-PR kann Templates bauen
  23. 23. 2. Open Research Data Screenshot: https://github.com/OKFNat/data/blob/master/asyl/asylantraege.csv ‣GitHub
  24. 24. 2. Open Research Data Screenshot: https://zenodo.org/record/50024
  25. 25. ‣3. Open Data in der Hochschule
  26. 26. 3. Open Data an einer Hochschule ‣Standorte, Öffnungszeiten ‣Wissensbilanz, Jahresberichte ‣Telefonbuch ‣Stundenpläne ‣Mensa-Speiseplan ‣Förderverträge ‣Veranstaltungen ‣Organigramm ‣Bilanzen ‣Statistiken (Mitarbeiter-, Bewerber-, Studierendenzahlen) ‣…
  27. 27. Ausblick ‣Datenintensive Kooperationen bringen Vorteile für Wissenschaft und Journalismus ‣Größte Herausforderung der Kooperation: Zeit & Geld ‣Chance für die Hochschulkommunikation
  28. 28. Ausblick 🎉 Forschungsservices Hochschulkommunikation Daten Wording Strategie Wissenschaft
  29. 29. Vielen Dank! Julian Ausserhofer (@julauss / julian.ausserhofer@hiig.de)
 
 Universität Göttingen, 15.09.16
 #allesdigital, Jahrestagung des Bundesverbands Hochschulkommunikation
 Workshop „Datenjournalismus in der Hochschulkommunikation”
  30. 30. Universität Göttingen, 15.09.16
 #allesdigital, Jahrestagung des Bundesverbands Hochschulkommunikation
 Workshop „Datenjournalismus in der Hochschulkommunikation” @hiig_berlin @achdujeh hofmann@hiig.de @julauss julian.ausserhofer@hiig.de @cbpuschmann cornelius.puschmann@hiig.de @derstandardat @nouramaan noura.maan@derstandard.at @fin markus.hametner@derstandard.at
  31. 31. Referenzen 1 Ausserhofer, J. (i.E.). Die Datenbank verdient die Hauptrolle: Bausteine einer Methodologie für Open Digital Humanities. In S. Eichhorn, B. Oberreither, M. Rauchenbacher, I. Schwentner, & K. Serles (Hrsg.), Aufgehoben? Speicherorte, -diskurse und -medien von Literatur. Würzburg: Königshausen & Neumann. Dant, A., & Richards, J. (2011, Dezember 8). Behind the rumours: How we built our Twitter riots interactive. The Guardian. Abgerufen von http://www.guardian.co.uk/news/datablog/2011/dec/08/twitter-riots-interactive Kasberger, S. (2013, August 8). Was ist Open Science? Abgerufen 13. September 2016, von http:// openscienceasap.org/open-science/ Klein, S. (2016, März 28). The New York Evening Post, January 11, 1806. Abgerufen 5. April 2016, von http:// tinyletter.com/abovechart/letters/the-new-york-evening-post-january-11-1806 Kraker, P., Leony, D., Reinhardt, W., & Beham, G. (2011). The case for an open science in technology enhanced learning. International Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning, 3(6), 643–654. doi:10.1504/IJTEL.2011.045454 Maan, N., & Schmid, F. (2016a, Juli 9). Was Pegida für die Wahrheit hält. Der Standard, S. 4–5. Wien. Maan, N., & Schmid, F. (2016b, Juli 10). Das Gegenteil von Lügenpresse. derStandard.at. Abgerufen von http:// derstandard.at/2000037622930/Das-Gegenteil-von-Luegenpresse
  32. 32. Referenzen 2 Puschmann, C., Ausserhofer, J., Hametner, M., & Maan, N. (2016, Juli). What are the topics of populist anti-immigrant movements on Facebook? Gehalten auf der Social Media & Society Conference, Goldsmiths, University of London, United Kingdom. Puschmann, C., Ausserhofer, J., Maan, N., & Hametner, M. (2016). Information laundering and counter-publics: The news sources of islamophobic groups on Twitter. In Proceedings of Social Media in the Newsroom (SMnews 2016) (Workshop at the 10th International AAAI Conference on Web and Social Media (ICWSM16)) (S. 143–150). Menlo Park: AAAI Press. Abgerufen von http://www.aaai.org/ocs/index.php/ICWSM/ICWSM16/paper/view/13224 Rogers, S. (2013). Facts are sacred: The power of data. London: Faber and Faber. Volkswagenstiftung. (2015). Ausschreibung: Wissenschaft und Datenjournalismus. Abgerufen von https:// www.volkswagenstiftung.de/fileadmin/downloads/merkblaetter/MB_105_d.pdf Weinacht, S., & Spiller, R. (2013). Wie wissenschaftlich ist Datenjournalismus? Ergebnisse einer bundesweiten Befragung. WPK Quarterly, (1), 14–15. Whyte, A., & Pryor, G. (2011). Open science in practice: Researcher perspectives and participation. International Journal of Digital Curation, 6(1), 199–213. doi:10.2218/ijdc.v6i1.182

×