Julie Hynes, MA, CPS
Problem Gambling Prevention Coordinator
Prevention Program Webmaster
Lane County Health & Human Servi...
Today’s Conversation
Study Oregon’s gambling prevention programming in
schools
Discuss strategies that made successful c...
(Apologies to Hawkeyes & Cyclones)
Go Ducks!
Photo source: http://www.thetribonline.com
Why consider problem gamblingWhy consider problem gambling
as an issue to address amongas an issue to address among
young ...
Trends
Availability
Community norms
Age
Co-occurrence; Research consistently shows teens who
gamble have higher rates of:
...
Why Problem Gambling?
Why Schools?
Source: http://oregon.pridesurveys.com
(Yikes)
Oregon Student Wellness Surveys
Source: http://oregon.pridesurveys.com
Why Integrate?
Why Integrate?Why Integrate?
No budget
No time
Best/evidence-based
practice approach
Similar brain
development issues
(rew...
On a time & money budget…
…march to the beat of someone else’s drum
Name 3 CSAP strategies (aside
from information
dissemination)
Information Dissemination
Prevention Education
Alternative Activities
Community-Based Processes
Problem Identification / R...
ADDING information dissemination in TO evidence-ADDING information dissemination in TO evidence-
based prevention educatio...
 One time ADD-ON to evidence-based alcohol/drug unit
(grades 6-8*)
 Objectives -- Students will be able to:
A. Cite the ...
Sample questionSample question
Debt
Crime
Depression/Suicide
Relationship problems
Employment problems
Alcohol and/or drug problems
Middle School
Video
Objectives: Middle school students* learn:
 What is gambling?
 Gambling is not risk-free.
 How to ...
Online readers: learn more & download the video at
http://preventionlane.org/gambling/youth-gambling-video.htm
Got policies?
Schools: Local
school/college/university
website, manual
Workplace: Look at
policy manuals
Community: Loo...
Policy example
Above: see http://preventionlane.org/gambling/about-us.htm
for complete chart & information
State staff ex...
Partnering with schools: Tips
Use a “How can we help?” approach
Partner with any ally you can find
Tap into community p...
Partnering with higher
education
CSAP: Info dissemination, policy, community
process, education, ID & referral (possibly
a...
Partnering with higher ed
Pros… & Not so pro’s
Fresh ideas
“Cheap labor”
Go where the issues are
Informal partnerships...
College materials can be risky 
I
♥
I
O
W
A
I
♥
I
O
W
A Source: University of Oregon PGAP
brandbook;
www.preventionlane.o...
Partnering with higher ed: Tips
Know what you want
Find whatever allies you can
Go with a “how we can help you” approac...
Taking the plunge
It doesn’t need to
be complicated;
infusing problem
gambling language
within the context
of the
curricul...
More tools
Social media
Websites, Blogs, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, etc.
If you can do it, it’s fairly inexpensive & easy to updat...
Great social media resources
Technology in Prevention Blog:
http://technologyinprevention.blogspot.com
CDC’s social medi...
Video contest
Cheap
Great for integration in schools where health curriculum
not a possibility
Ask media, A/V, drama te...
preventionlane.org/gambling
Prevention/outreach resource:
problemgamblingprevention.org
A great all-in-one tool
Updated annually
Contains facts and figures,
factsheets, overviews,
templates, etc. for increasi...
System evaluation results
Prevention and outreach are working:
Evaluation report in Oregon shows many successes; see
http...
Successes… & Challenges
Approaching schools/coalitions
with internal partners
Sharing how this BENEFITS
them, not adds w...
Two things you learned or
gained in this workshop.
Hopefully you gained
something!
If at first
you don’t
succeed…
…take off your pants
and throw them.
Thank you!
For more info:
Julie Hynes, MA, CPS
Lane County Health & Human Services
Oregon Problem Gambling Services
Julie....
Problem Gambling and Beyond: 2010 Iowa Prevention Conference
Problem Gambling and Beyond: 2010 Iowa Prevention Conference
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Problem Gambling and Beyond: 2010 Iowa Prevention Conference

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Problem Gambling and Beyond: Practical School Programming and Social Media Tools | Julie Hynes, MA, CPS

http://www.preventionlane.org

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  • “Deal or No Deal” game show theme used for educational purposes only. For information about this presentation and its use, contact Julie Hynes, Lane County Health & Human Services | 541.682.3928 | julie.hynes@co.lane.or.us
    At the end of the session, participant will be able to:
    Understand the prevalence of problem gambling among Oregon youth
    Identify relationships between gambling and other risky behaviors
    State the effects of problem gambling on youth, family members and the community
    Identify signs of a problem gambler
    Understand how and where to refer someone for help or assessment
    Identify at least 3 resources which can be used in problem gambling prevention
    Deal or No Deal? Play here!
    First Deal or No Deal question: What activity has correlations with drinking, drugs, sexual activity, and violent behavior, yet little or no attention is paid to it in health courses? Would you believe it’s youth gambling? Data from Oregon Healthy Teens surveys show that gambling and other risky behaviors often go hand-in-hand, yet many parents and educators unsuspectingly promote poker and other gambling-related games as harmless recreational activities. This session will provide useful information on an increasingly popular activity that is far from risk free and will address what can be done to minimize harm from gambling.
    We will have a fun, interactive multimedia game based upon the “Deal or No Deal” game show. Easy rules! Workshop participants will receive free DVDs and facilitator guides of Oregon’s new award-winning youth problem gambling prevention video.
  • Question 3.
  • Question 3.
  • Question 3.
  • “Deal or No Deal” game show theme used for educational purposes only. For information about this presentation and its use, contact Julie Hynes, Lane County Health & Human Services | 541.682.3928 | julie.hynes@co.lane.or.us
    At the end of the session, participant will be able to:
    Understand the prevalence of problem gambling among Oregon youth
    Identify relationships between gambling and other risky behaviors
    State the effects of problem gambling on youth, family members and the community
    Identify signs of a problem gambler
    Understand how and where to refer someone for help or assessment
    Identify at least 3 resources which can be used in problem gambling prevention
    Deal or No Deal? Play here!
    First Deal or No Deal question: What activity has correlations with drinking, drugs, sexual activity, and violent behavior, yet little or no attention is paid to it in health courses? Would you believe it’s youth gambling? Data from Oregon Healthy Teens surveys show that gambling and other risky behaviors often go hand-in-hand, yet many parents and educators unsuspectingly promote poker and other gambling-related games as harmless recreational activities. This session will provide useful information on an increasingly popular activity that is far from risk free and will address what can be done to minimize harm from gambling.
    We will have a fun, interactive multimedia game based upon the “Deal or No Deal” game show. Easy rules! Workshop participants will receive free DVDs and facilitator guides of Oregon’s new award-winning youth problem gambling prevention video.
  • Behavioral, psychological, physical
    A correlation between gambling and all forms of substance abuse exists.
    Gamblers are more likely to…
    Lose their jobs, be demoted
    Fall deeply into debt and file for bankruptcy
    Lose their homes and personal property
    Accumulate legal fees due to divorce, criminal activities
    Run up medical, mental health bills
    Well-demonstrated relationship of problem gambling with other risky behaviors
    Excessive alcohol use & binge drinking
    Regular tobacco use
    Illicit drug use
    Overeating/binge eating
    Source: Engwall & Steinberg, 2003; Ladouceur, Dube, &^ Bujold, 1994; Lesieur, et al., 1991
  • <number>
  • <number>
  • <number>
  • Question 3.
  • At the end of the session, participant will be able to:
    Understand the prevalence of problem gambling among Oregon youth
    Identify relationships between gambling and other risky behaviors
    State the effects of problem gambling on youth, family members and the community
    Identify signs of a problem gambler
    Understand how and where to refer someone for help or assessment
    Identify at least 3 resources which can be used in problem gambling prevention
    Deal or No Deal? Play here!
    First Deal or No Deal question: What activity has correlations with drinking, drugs, sexual activity, and violent behavior, yet little or no attention is paid to it in health courses? Would you believe it’s youth gambling? Data from Oregon Healthy Teens surveys show that gambling and other risky behaviors often go hand-in-hand, yet many parents and educators unsuspectingly promote poker and other gambling-related games as harmless recreational activities. This session will provide useful information on an increasingly popular activity that is far from risk free and will address what can be done to minimize harm from gambling.
    We will have a fun, interactive multimedia game based upon the “Deal or No Deal” game show. Easy rules! Workshop participants will receive free DVDs and facilitator guides of Oregon’s new award-winning youth problem gambling prevention video.
  • Problem Gambling and Beyond: 2010 Iowa Prevention Conference

    1. 1. Julie Hynes, MA, CPS Problem Gambling Prevention Coordinator Prevention Program Webmaster Lane County Health & Human Services Oregon Problem Gambling Services Problem Gambling & Beyond: Practical School Programming & Social Media Tools
    2. 2. Today’s Conversation Study Oregon’s gambling prevention programming in schools Discuss strategies that made successful change happen in schools Discuss technology & social media strategies Examine applicability of Oregon’s initiatives for the State of Iowa
    3. 3. (Apologies to Hawkeyes & Cyclones) Go Ducks! Photo source: http://www.thetribonline.com
    4. 4. Why consider problem gamblingWhy consider problem gambling as an issue to address amongas an issue to address among young people? (3 reasons)young people? (3 reasons)
    5. 5. Trends Availability Community norms Age Co-occurrence; Research consistently shows teens who gamble have higher rates of: – Alcohol use & binge drinking – Substance use – Sexual behavior Risk factors similar to other problem behaviors (Sources: Oregon Department of Human Services, 2010; Marotta & Hynes, 2003; Derevensky & Gupta, 2002 – complete citations available at www.preventionlane.org/gambling/references.htm)cali Why Problem Gambling?Why Problem Gambling? – Delinquency – Violent behavior – Handgun possession
    6. 6. Why Problem Gambling?
    7. 7. Why Schools? Source: http://oregon.pridesurveys.com (Yikes)
    8. 8. Oregon Student Wellness Surveys Source: http://oregon.pridesurveys.com
    9. 9. Why Integrate?
    10. 10. Why Integrate?Why Integrate? No budget No time Best/evidence-based practice approach Similar brain development issues (reward pathway) This is not what integration should look like
    11. 11. On a time & money budget… …march to the beat of someone else’s drum
    12. 12. Name 3 CSAP strategies (aside from information dissemination)
    13. 13. Information Dissemination Prevention Education Alternative Activities Community-Based Processes Problem Identification / Referral Environmental / Policy Using CSAP’s Effective Prevention Strategies Research: it takes ongoing efforts in all six areas for prevention to really work
    14. 14. ADDING information dissemination in TO evidence-ADDING information dissemination in TO evidence- based prevention education. [Download this atbased prevention education. [Download this at http://www.preventionlane.org/gambling/deal-no-dice.htm ]]
    15. 15.  One time ADD-ON to evidence-based alcohol/drug unit (grades 6-8*)  Objectives -- Students will be able to: A. Cite the general definitions of gambling and problem gambling B. Understand key differences between social (responsible) and problem gambling C. Understand how problem gambling shares commonalities with other addictive behaviors D. Verbalize how to access help when they believe they or a loved one have a gambling problem *could be modified for any age or grade level
    16. 16. Sample questionSample question
    17. 17. Debt Crime Depression/Suicide Relationship problems Employment problems Alcohol and/or drug problems
    18. 18. Middle School Video Objectives: Middle school students* learn:  What is gambling?  Gambling is not risk-free.  How to recognize problem gambling.  How to get help. Best used to supplement addictions curriculum Provides facilitator guide *Targeted for 6-8th grades; practically speaking, it’s best for 5th -6th
    19. 19. Online readers: learn more & download the video at http://preventionlane.org/gambling/youth-gambling-video.htm
    20. 20. Got policies? Schools: Local school/college/university website, manual Workplace: Look at policy manuals Community: Look at your local jurisdiction's ordinances Adapted from Oregon DHS, 2010 Got problems? Is there news on the issue? Got allies? Coalitions, social media Got time & ability? Policy takes time + know your role
    21. 21. Policy example Above: see http://preventionlane.org/gambling/about-us.htm for complete chart & information State staff exhibited & presented at school teacher trainings OR Dept of Ed health education standards now includes problem gambling at 6-8th grade level
    22. 22. Partnering with schools: Tips Use a “How can we help?” approach Partner with any ally you can find Tap into community parenting programs (e.g., Strengthening Families Integrate with selective prevention programs (e.g., Reconnecting Youth) Consider timing (not September or months during testing) Casino night alternative tips: http://preventionlane.org/gambling/Resources/casino_nights_alter natives.pdf CSAP: Info dissemination, policy, community process, education, ID & referral (possibly alternative activities)
    23. 23. Partnering with higher education CSAP: Info dissemination, policy, community process, education, ID & referral (possibly alternative activities)
    24. 24. Partnering with higher ed Pros… & Not so pro’s Fresh ideas “Cheap labor” Go where the issues are Informal partnerships may be best (see “cons”)  ↑ Formality = ↑ bureaucracy Remember that students are students Holy bureaucracy, Batman! Deadlines around terms, etc. Cool stuff you might not be able to use (see next slide) Did we mention bureaucracy?
    25. 25. College materials can be risky  I ♥ I O W A I ♥ I O W A Source: University of Oregon PGAP brandbook; www.preventionlane.org/gambling/pgap.htm
    26. 26. Partnering with higher ed: Tips Know what you want Find whatever allies you can Go with a “how we can help you” approach Set realistic expectations Integrate wherever possible Don’t overcomplicate it (contracts = bureaucracy) Try to get questions on counseling/health center assessments If you can, do a needs assessment survey: (example: http://preventionlane.org/gambling/collegesurvey.htm)
    27. 27. Taking the plunge It doesn’t need to be complicated; infusing problem gambling language within the context of the curriculum/eval can easily meet fidelity reqt’s
    28. 28. More tools
    29. 29. Social media Websites, Blogs, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, etc. If you can do it, it’s fairly inexpensive & easy to update!
    30. 30. Great social media resources Technology in Prevention Blog: http://technologyinprevention.blogspot.com CDC’s social media toolkit: http://www.cdc.gov/healthcommunication/ToolsTemplates/ SocialMediaToolkit_BM.pdf
    31. 31. Video contest Cheap Great for integration in schools where health curriculum not a possibility Ask media, A/V, drama teachers about participating See http://preventionlane.org/videos.htm for more information
    32. 32. preventionlane.org/gambling
    33. 33. Prevention/outreach resource: problemgamblingprevention.org
    34. 34. A great all-in-one tool Updated annually Contains facts and figures, factsheets, overviews, templates, etc. for increasing awareness of problem gambling Can be downloaded at http://problemgamblingprevention.org/opgaw-guide-2010.htm
    35. 35. System evaluation results Prevention and outreach are working: Evaluation report in Oregon shows many successes; see http://problemgamblingprevention.org/reports/08-09-AD80-Annual-Report for more complete report Oregon is one of the few states that appears to have averted a significant increase in problem gambling prevalence while expanding legalized gambling (National Center For the Study of Gambling, 2006) 1. Moore & Marotta, in press 2. National Center For the Study of Gambling, 2006.
    36. 36. Successes… & Challenges Approaching schools/coalitions with internal partners Sharing how this BENEFITS them, not adds work Using “Why should you care?” message Using local data Knowing the language (e.g., education standards) Asking questions Gambling still not on radar Gambling not a priority Lack of resources & time Strict curriculum demands
    37. 37. Two things you learned or gained in this workshop.
    38. 38. Hopefully you gained something!
    39. 39. If at first you don’t succeed…
    40. 40. …take off your pants and throw them.
    41. 41. Thank you! For more info: Julie Hynes, MA, CPS Lane County Health & Human Services Oregon Problem Gambling Services Julie.Hynes@co.lane.or.us | 541.628.3928 preventionlane.org | problemgamblingprevention.org Let’s share resources! Please “like” us at www.facebook.com/preventionpage and www.facebook.com/problemgamblingprevention

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