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Problem Gambling Prevention: Key Information for Gambling Industry, Regulators & Policymakers

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Julie Hynes, MA, CPS
2014 National Conference on Problem Gambling

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Problem Gambling Prevention: Key Information for Gambling Industry, Regulators & Policymakers

  1. 1. Julie Hynes, MA, CPS Sr. Community Health Analyst - PreventionLane Instructor - University of Oregon July 11, 2014 Key Information for Gambling Industry, Regulators & Policymakers
  2. 2. Slide deck: www.preventionlane.org/ncpg
  3. 3. • Define what preventionists call “prevention” • Understand the need for disordered/problem gambling prevention • Identify strategies and resources for disordered/problem gambling prevention SPECIAL THANKS • Oregon Problem Gambling Services • Jim Wuelfing • Researchers!
  4. 4. prevention.
  5. 5. Problem Behaviors
  6. 6. Problem Behaviors
  7. 7. for prevention in problem gambling
  8. 8. 5.6% college age (18-24) 2½ % all adults (18+) 4-6% teens (13-17) This is the first generation of widely available electronic gambling. We really don’t know the effects yet. Why? Is it the generation? Technology? Or what?
  9. 9. Amygdala active Risk-taking & impulsive behaviors Source: Ramoski, S., Nystrom, R. (2007). Image source: simpsons.wikia.org Prefrontal whaaa?
  10. 10. 2012 Oregon Student Wellness Survey, Lane County (“ESD”) and Oregon; available at http://oregon.pridesurveys.com/esds.php?year=2012
  11. 11. • Youth gambling is harmless • Youth who gamble are unlikely to have problems in school • Youth gambling is not associated with alcohol or drug use …AND THOSE BELIEFS ARE
  12. 12. Source: PARENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF ADOLESCENT GAMBLING (2011).,
  13. 13. All parents in their focus groups said their kids didn’t gamble All of their kids, who were in their own focus groups, said they did gamble Neither sees gambling as risky
  14. 14. Youth gambling & other risky behaviors.
  15. 15. 3.1% 14.6% 29.5% 14.9% 30.9% 46.9% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled
  16. 16. 0.5% 5.6% 16.4% 4.3% 12.7% 28.7% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  17. 17. 1.1% 6.2% 12.5% 5.1% 10.8% 18.7% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  18. 18. 0.7% 8.3% 19.3% 4.3% 15.8% 28.4% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  19. 19. 5.7% 12.8% 22.5% 15.4% 23.0% 35.4% Grade 6 Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  20. 20. 7.2% 5.0% 11.3% 9.0% Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not gamble Gambled Available at: www.preventionlane.org/sws.htm
  21. 21. 10.1% 8.0% 21.0% 18.6% Grade 8 Grade 11 Did not bet/gamble more than wanted to Bet/gambled more than wanted to
  22. 22. 41.80% 22.40% Physical fight Gambled Did not gamble
  23. 23. Teens who gamble are smoking, toking, drunken, depressed thugs.
  24. 24. Teens who gamble are smoking, toking, drunken, depressed thugs.
  25. 25. delinquency sexual behavior depression substance use gambling Conclusion: Problem Gambling is of Problem Behaviors
  26. 26. Problem gambling?? – Apparently similar risk factors – Very high co-occurrence between problem gambling & other problem behaviors, especially alcohol/substance abuse Substance abuse Violence Delinquency Teenage pregnancy School dropout Depression & Anxiety
  27. 27. ALL
  28. 28. • Tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use and abuse • Delinquency and crime • Premature or unsafe sex • Depression and suicidality • School failure, dropout Based on the above & those connections, we should also be able to prevent PROBLEM GAMBLING.
  29. 29. In fact, they can be HARMFUL.
  30. 30. Follow-up link: best practices http://preventionlane.org/best-practices.htm
  31. 31. Prevention in .
  32. 32. We Use the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention’s (CSAP) Effective Prevention Strategies Research: it takes ongoing efforts in all six areas for prevention to really work
  33. 33. Long-lasting Protective Interventions Clinical Interventions Counseling & Education Socioeconomic Factors Changing the Context Make the Healthy Choice the Easy Choice Examples of Interventions Screening for problems Parenting classes Home visiting Changing Social Norms & Creating Nurturing Environments small group a population Success in education,  Economic opportunity,  Access to affordable housing Approach Source: Frieden, (CDC) adapted by L. Adkisson & J. Webster (LCPH)
  34. 34. – Schools: Local school/college/university codes of conduct – Workplace: Policy manuals: gambling behavior – Community: Local jurisdiction's ordinances – Industry: marketing practices Adapted from Oregon DHS, 2010
  35. 35. • Public awareness • Policy • School-based curriculum • Parent education
  36. 36. • Public awareness • Policy • School-based curriculum • Parent education
  37. 37. Prevention and awareness efforts have been able to PREVENT an increase in the prevalence of problem gambling while facing a dramatic increase in the amount of gambling.
  38. 38. Youthful subject Little “street cred” as a real issue Stigma/shame People are buried with work Mixed messages Gratuitous pic of my kid KEY IN prevention
  39. 39. Consider doing one of your assignments on a vulnerable population group we didn’t get to explore. problemgamblingprevention.org youthgambling.com:
  40. 40. Consider doing one of your assignments on a vulnerable population group we didn’t get to explore. preventionlane.org addictionisagamble.org :
  41. 41. www.preventionlane.org Julie.Hynes@co.lane.or.us | 541.682.3928 Lane County Public Health “PreventionLane” hynes@uoregon.edu | 541.357.9334 University of Oregon preventionlane
  42. 42. References American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (4th ed., text revision). Washington, DC: Author. Cross, Del Carmen Lorenzo, & Fuentes (1999). The extent and nature of gambling among college student athletes. Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michigan Department of Athletics. Department of Defense (2002). Survey of health related behaviors among military personnel Washington, DC: Author. Report information available http://www.tricare.mil/main/news/dodsurvey.htm DiClemente, C. (2003). Addiction and change: How addictions develop and addicted people recover. New York: Guilford Press. ECONorthwest (2009). The contributions of Indian gaming to Oregon’s economy. http://www.econw.com/reports/2009_ECONorthwest_Contributions-Indian-Gaming-Oregon- Economy-2007.pdf Engwall, Hunter & Steinberg (2004). Gambling and other risk behaviors on university campuses. Journal of American College Health. 52 (6); 245-255. Freimuth, M. (2008). Addicted? Recognizing Destructive Behavior Before It's Too Late . Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers. Kerber (2005). Problem and pathological gambling among college athletes. Annual of Clinical Psychiatry. 17 (4); 243-7. LaBrie, R., Shaffer, H., LaPlante, D., and Wechslet, H. (2003). Correlates of college student gambling in United States. Journal of American College Health. 52 (2); 53-62. Moore , T.L. (2002.) The etiology of pathological gambling. Salem, OR: Department of Human
  43. 43. ReferencesMoore, TL. (2006). Oregon gambling prevalence replication study. Salem, OR: Department of Human Services. http://www.oregoncpg.com Moore (2001). Older adult gambling in Oregon. Salem, OR: Department of Human Services. http://www.oregoncpg.com Northwest Survey & Data Services (2007). Lane County Health & Human Services college gambling survey. http://www.preventionlane.org/gambling/college.htm Oregon Health Authority, Problem Gambling Services (2011). Oregon problem gambling awareness community resource guide. Salem, OR: Author. Oregon Lottery (2009). Oregon State Lottery Behavior and Attitude Tracking Study. November 2008. InfoTek Research Group, Inc. Oregon Lottery (2008). Overview through fiscal year 2009. Salem, OR: Author. Ramoski, S., Nystrom, R. (2007). The changing adolescent brain. Northwest Public Health. http://www.nwpublichealth.org/archives/s2007/adolescent-brain Rockey, D.L., Beason, K.R., & Gilbert, J.D. (2002). Gambling by college athletes: An association between problem gambling and athletes. http://www.camh.net/egambling/archive/pdf/EJGI-issue7/EJGI-issue7-research- rockey.pdf Shaffer, H.J., Donato, Labrie, Kidman, & LaPlante. (2005). The epidemiology of college alcohol and gambling policies. Harm Reduction Journal. 2 (1). Shaffer, H.J. & Hall, M.N. (2001). Updating and refining meta-analytic prevalence estimates of disordered gambling behavior in the United States and Canada. Canadian Journal of Public Health, 92(3), 168-172. Volberg, R.A., Hedberg, E.C., & Moore, T.L. (2008). Adolescent Gambling in Oregon. Northhampton, MA: Gemini Research. http://gamblingaddiction.org

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