What is a global approach to reading?Reported by: Rea J. Patining
Introduction • A global reading approach assumes   that a person learns to read best   when reading begins with natural an...
Definition • A global approach to reading is   an approach that begins by giving   learners natural, meaningful text to   ...
examples of global reading approachesReported by: Rea J. Patining
1. Do a language experience approach activity with the learnersReported by: Rea J. Patining
Do a language experience      approach activity with the               learners• A language experience activity is usually...
Examples• Taking a trip to an interesting location• Bringing an animal or object to the classroom to  observe and discuss•...
2. neurological impress activityReported by: Rea J. Patining
Using a neurological impress           activityBENEFITS:• Develops reading fluency• Helps impress the words into the learn...
Using a neurological impress           activity• Models reading fluency and mechanics• Provides a pleasant, non-threatenin...
Using a neurological impress           activityGUIDELINES:• For best results, do this activity daily over a  period of sev...
Using a neurological impress           activity• Try this procedure in nonformal settings where  literate people might tea...
Steps: Using a regular   size bookReported by: Rea J. Patining
Steps: Using a regular size               book1. Sit side by side so that the teacher can speak  into the learners ear.Tip...
Steps: Using a regular size               book2. Jointly hold the book between you.3. Begin by reading aloud together.4. R...
Steps: Using a regular size               book5. Track the words smoothly with a finger as you   read.Note: This allows th...
Steps: Using a regular size               book5. Occasionally lower the volume of your voice to   allow the learner to lea...
Steps: Using a regular size               book5. Occasionally lower the volume of your voice to   allow the learner to lea...
Steps: Using big book   or wall chartReported by: Rea J. Patining
Steps: Using a Big book or            wall chart1. Place a large book or chart on an easel so that   everyone in the group...
Steps: Using a Big book or            wall chart2. Begin by reading aloud together.   – Read a little faster and louder th...
Steps: Using a Big book or            wall chart3. Occasionally lower the volume of your voice to   allow the learners to ...
3. Usingshared readingReported by: Rea J. Patining
Guidelines 1. Discuss the story and illustrations with the   learners    – prior to reading to build anticipation, or    –...
Steps 1. Select an interesting story with repetition, or use    a favorite story. 2. When introducing a new story, talk ab...
Steps 3. Read the story to the group, tracking each word    with a pointer as you read. 4. Reread the story as a group, en...
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Global

  1. 1. What is a global approach to reading?Reported by: Rea J. Patining
  2. 2. Introduction • A global reading approach assumes that a person learns to read best when reading begins with natural and meaningful text.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 2
  3. 3. Definition • A global approach to reading is an approach that begins by giving learners natural, meaningful text to listen to, look at, and memorize by sight.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 3
  4. 4. examples of global reading approachesReported by: Rea J. Patining
  5. 5. 1. Do a language experience approach activity with the learnersReported by: Rea J. Patining
  6. 6. Do a language experience approach activity with the learners• A language experience activity is usually an activity that learners do together. It could also be any experience an individual or group has had. After the experience, a teacher or leader helps the learners write about what they have experienced.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 6
  7. 7. Examples• Taking a trip to an interesting location• Bringing an animal or object to the classroom to observe and discuss• Inviting a guest to class• Taking a walk and observing the people and surroundingsReported by: Rea J. Patining 7
  8. 8. 2. neurological impress activityReported by: Rea J. Patining
  9. 9. Using a neurological impress activityBENEFITS:• Develops reading fluency• Helps impress the words into the learners memory• Helps learners imitate correct pronunciation, intonation, and phrasing• Increases confidence in readingReported by: Rea J. Patining 9
  10. 10. Using a neurological impress activity• Models reading fluency and mechanics• Provides a pleasant, non-threatening reading experience• Provides immediate feedback and success in readingReported by: Rea J. Patining 10
  11. 11. Using a neurological impress activityGUIDELINES:• For best results, do this activity daily over a period of several months.• Be aware of cultural considerations in a close working relationship such as this requires.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 11
  12. 12. Using a neurological impress activity• Try this procedure in nonformal settings where literate people might teach other family members or friends:• Use texts with words the learner can already read.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 12
  13. 13. Steps: Using a regular size bookReported by: Rea J. Patining
  14. 14. Steps: Using a regular size book1. Sit side by side so that the teacher can speak into the learners ear.Tip: Determine which hand the learner writes and eats with and sit on that side of the learner.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 14
  15. 15. Steps: Using a regular size book2. Jointly hold the book between you.3. Begin by reading aloud together.4. Read a little faster and louder than the learner.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 15
  16. 16. Steps: Using a regular size book5. Track the words smoothly with a finger as you read.Note: This allows the learner to hear the word just before saying it, and imitate the intonation and flow of the language.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 16
  17. 17. Steps: Using a regular size book5. Occasionally lower the volume of your voice to allow the learner to lead the reading.6. Help the learner gradually take over tracking by guiding their hand smoothly under the words.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 17
  18. 18. Steps: Using a regular size book5. Occasionally lower the volume of your voice to allow the learner to lead the reading.6. Help the learner gradually take over tracking by guiding their hand smoothly under the words.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 18
  19. 19. Steps: Using big book or wall chartReported by: Rea J. Patining
  20. 20. Steps: Using a Big book or wall chart1. Place a large book or chart on an easel so that everyone in the group can see it.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 20
  21. 21. Steps: Using a Big book or wall chart2. Begin by reading aloud together. – Read a little faster and louder than the learners. – Track the words smoothly with a pointer as you read.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 21
  22. 22. Steps: Using a Big book or wall chart3. Occasionally lower the volume of your voice to allow the learners to lead the reading.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 22
  23. 23. 3. Usingshared readingReported by: Rea J. Patining
  24. 24. Guidelines 1. Discuss the story and illustrations with the learners – prior to reading to build anticipation, or – after reading to aid comprehension. 2. Have the learners "hum" to get the feel and intonation of the words. 3. Read fluently and expressively.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 24
  25. 25. Steps 1. Select an interesting story with repetition, or use a favorite story. 2. When introducing a new story, talk about – the title – the cover illustration, and – the kind of story.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 25
  26. 26. Steps 3. Read the story to the group, tracking each word with a pointer as you read. 4. Reread the story as a group, encouraging everyone to join in "reading" certain words or phrases as they are able.Reported by: Rea J. Patining 26

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