Emergence of modern Canada
1896 – 1914
The Laurier Era
• Macdonald dies in “office” June 6, 1891, he had been Prime
Minister for almost 19 years, and had served ...
Military Protection
• As part of the British Empire, Canada relied on Britain to
provide military protection. British troo...
Naval Service Act 1910
• As tension increased in the lead up to WWI, Britain called
upon Canada to provide money and ships...
Alaska Boundary Dispute
Alaska Boundary Dispute
Settledin1903
• When the US had purchased Alaska from the Russians in 1867,
there was not a firm b...
Reciprocity pg 254
• Define “reciprocity” and explain the “pros” and “cons”
• Definition: an exchange of goods and service...
Golden Mountain
• For many Chinese, BC was thought to be a ‘golden mountain’
that would provide work and opportunity for i...
Komagata Maru 1914
• Although Canada needed immigrants to build the population
of the country, only certain immigrants wer...
Less than equal
• Other groups within Canada suffered from the same unequal
treatment from Canadian political policies, as...
Women’s Suffrage Movement
• Women’s suffrage movement – demanding the right to vote
began during the Laurier era.
• https:...
Residential Schools
• http://wherearethechildren.ca/en/resources/#507
• Radio Clip on CBC about the residential school in ...
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Horizons Chp 7 Continued

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Komagata Maru, Golden Mountain, Continuous Passage, Women's Suffrage

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  • ----- Meeting Notes (2014-05-12 14:20) -----
    Reciprocity - an exchange of goods and services between Canada and the US - where taxes & tariffs would be eliminated to make prices similiar in the US and Canada

    PROS - cheaper good for Canadian consumers
    more goods available
    CONS - hard for Canadian businesses to compete, defeats the purpose of the RR is trade is north, south not East - West, more proof US would overtake Canada
  • Continuous passage – immigrants only allowed to arrive in Canada after a non stop voyage – impossible from India
  • Horizons Chp 7 Continued

    1. 1. Emergence of modern Canada 1896 – 1914
    2. 2. The Laurier Era • Macdonald dies in “office” June 6, 1891, he had been Prime Minister for almost 19 years, and had served as leader of the opposition. • Wilfred Laurier, a Liberal is elected as Prime Minister in 1896 • He used the Manitoba Schools Question to gain votes, by promising to address the problems in Manitoba for French speakers. He was able to get many voters in Quebec to support his campaign for leadership. • But when he became PM, he did not change the policy for French language instruction, he only offered protection for religious instruction.
    3. 3. Military Protection • As part of the British Empire, Canada relied on Britain to provide military protection. British troops were stationed in Halifax, Nova Scotia and Esquimalt. We know they were welcomed into ‘high society’ events in Victoria, as suitable immigrants to remain in Canada • Britain wanted the support to go both ways. In return for protecting Canadian interests, Britain wanted Canada to send troops (soldiers) to fight in South Africa against the Boers (early Dutch colonists in South Africa). English in Canada supported sending troops, French did not. Why send their sons to fight Britain’s imperialist war?
    4. 4. Naval Service Act 1910 • As tension increased in the lead up to WWI, Britain called upon Canada to provide money and ships to ensure Britain’s naval supremacy. • French Canadians wanted Canada to build its own navy ships, that could be “lent out” to Britain, but would provide Canada with its own navy. • Laurier compromised with the Naval Service Act, promising to build Canadian war ships, while borrowing a couple from Britain in the meantime. Canada would lend their new ships to Britain in times of need. By 1914, start of WWI, Canada still didn’t have its own ships.
    5. 5. Alaska Boundary Dispute
    6. 6. Alaska Boundary Dispute Settledin1903 • When the US had purchased Alaska from the Russians in 1867, there was not a firm border between Alaska and Canadian Territory. • When the Klondike Gold Rush began, the division between the US and Canada needed to be settled. Canada wanted to be able to move gold and supplies without having to cross into US territory, as most of the transportation networks were via the Pacific. • An appointed tribunal led by a British judge settled in favour of the Americans, cutting off half of BC coastline off from access to the Pacific. • http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/alaska-boundary- dispute/
    7. 7. Reciprocity pg 254 • Define “reciprocity” and explain the “pros” and “cons” • Definition: an exchange of goods and services between Canada and the US - where taxes & tariffs would be eliminated to make prices similiar in the US and Canada
    8. 8. Golden Mountain • For many Chinese, BC was thought to be a ‘golden mountain’ that would provide work and opportunity for immigrants from China. Instead they found hardship, discrimination and a ‘head tax’ • As soon as the CPR was completed, the Federal Government moved to restrict the immigration of Chinese to Canada. The first federal anti-Chinese bill was passed in 1885. It took the form of a Head tax of $50 imposed, with few exceptions, upon every person of Chinese origin entering the country. No other group was targeted in this way. http://www.ccnc.ca/redress/history.html • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_8SzZGsvdI 1:08:14
    9. 9. Komagata Maru 1914 • Although Canada needed immigrants to build the population of the country, only certain immigrants were ‘desirable’ • When the Komagata Maru tried to dock in Vancouver in 1914, the immigrants were considered to be part of a “Hindu Invasion” rather than British Immigrants – although they were all British citizens. • Immigration officials refused to let passengers disembark, based on the ‘continuous passage amendment’ and they were forced to leave Vancouver 2 months later, without ever having landed on Canadian soil.
    10. 10. Less than equal • Other groups within Canada suffered from the same unequal treatment from Canadian political policies, as only male property owners were allowed to vote. Those who were ‘disenfranchised’ included women, Natives and Asian immigrants. • Women in Canada were typically ‘house-bound’ raising 10+ children was not uncommon, neither was dying in child birth. • Under the 1892 Criminal Code, birth control was obscene, "tending to corrupt morals." Unless an accused could prove that its advocacy had been "for the public good," he or she was liable to serve a 2-year jail sentence. http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/birth-control/
    11. 11. Women’s Suffrage Movement • Women’s suffrage movement – demanding the right to vote began during the Laurier era. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_8SzZGsvdI • 54:30 Start
    12. 12. Residential Schools • http://wherearethechildren.ca/en/resources/#507 • Radio Clip on CBC about the residential school in Sechelt, BC

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