How Do You Eat An Elephant?    One Bite At A Time!       Science                       Math             Social            ...
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Goals for this Presentation• Review the standard revision process• Become familiar with social studies tools• Show how the...
Goals for Social Studies         Standards Revision1. Identify the most essential concepts and skills.2. Make them more us...
Goal 1: Identify the Most Essential Concepts and SkillsThis was accomplished with input from many individuals  and groups ...
Goal 2: Greater Manageability and Greater Depth of Understanding • The seven standards in the 2002 document   were condens...
New Social Studies Strands
Ohio’s Academic Content  Standards: Social StudiesStrands:       Skills/Topics:• History      • Historical thinking• Geogr...
Revised Scope and SequencePre-K          The Classroom CommunityKindergarten   A Child’s Place in Time and SpaceGrade 1   ...
Social Studies Academic ContentThemes      Standards Format      Grade                                 DescriptionsStrands...
High School Course SyllabiRequired for graduation (Ohio Revised Code)• American History• American Government           Ele...
Goal 4: Provide Clear Progression of   Content from Grade to GradeGrade Four, Content Statement 21:• The Ohio Constitution...
Goal 5: Meet the Needs of Students        for the 21st Century  The social studies academic content  standards directly ad...
21st Century Skills
21st        Century Skills                          Information, Life and Career           Media and          Learning and...
Answer questions      1-3
What is the Model Curriculum?     A web-based tool that:     • Provides curricular and instructional       guidance;     •...
Search and Find• In your groups, use the Model Curriculum to  answer questions 4-6• Share out
4-Square ActivityActivityWe will go through the squares one at a time toexplain them, providing you with guided practice.T...
4-Square Activity  Strand, topic, content statements):Strand  Topic  Content   StatementAlignment tool                  ...
4-Square Activity                   What must students know (knowledge –                   concepts, vocabulary, processes...
4-Square Activity                          Thinking skillsWhat must students be able to do (performanceand skills)?What ar...
4-Square Activity                    Enduring                   Relevant                           What are the significan...
27
4-Square ActivityDirections1. Select group members to serve as   recorder, timekeeper and reporter.2. With your group, sel...
4-Square ActivityThink – Pair - ShareHow can the 4-Square Activity assistin curriculum development?                       ...
Connecting Social Studies          and Literacy“Creating informed, engaged citizens isarduous work. To be critical thinker...
Literacy StandardsThe Common Core for ELA & Literacysets requirements for literacy inhistory/social studies.ODE will devel...
How Do You Eat An Elephant?    One Bite At A Time!     Science                     Math           Social           Studies...
How Do You Feel After You    Eat An Elephant?
Social studies roll out
Social studies roll out
Social studies roll out
Social studies roll out
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Social studies roll out

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  • The Goals for this session are to:Review the standard revision processBecome familiar with social studies toolsShow how the revised standards provide the basis for the Model CurriculumUnderstand the purposes and components of the Model CurriculumPractice using the standards and Model Curricula to create units and lessons for instructions
  • The goals for the revision of the Social Studies standards were to: identify the most essential concepts and skills. make them more user-friendly and manageable – i.e., to pare down the content for in-depth instruction; provide course syllabi for high school courses;provide clear progression of content;address the needs of students for the 21st century.
  • The first goal, to identify the most essential concepts and skills, was accomplished with input from many individuals and groups. These included a discussion group of teachers representing the diversity of Ohio’s school districts and regions of the state; an advisory committee representing Ohio social studies stakeholder groups; a working group consisting of teachers, professors, and curriculum supervisors; focus groups; national content experts; and online reviews by the public.
  • The second goal was for the revised standards to be more manageable for teachers and provide greater depth of understanding for students. Consequently, the seven standards in the 2002 document were condensed to four strands. For example, the Government and Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities standards have been combined into one strand. Manageability was also achieved by reducing the amount that is to be taught at each grade level. As an example, under the 2002 standards grade six had 36 grade-level indicators, under the 2010 standards, grade six has only 16 content statements. These developments allow for teaching content in greater depth.
  • In an effort to streamline the standards, the seven standards from the 2002 version have been collapsed into four strands.The blue shaded areas on the left side of the diagram indicate the current standard structure and the four purple areas on the right side indicate the proposed strands. We go from seven standards to four strands. This chart also reflects the inclusion of skills into each strand. The People in Societies standard has been incorporated in both the History and Geography Strands. The Government and Citizenship Rights and Responsibilities standards have been combined into one strand. Some of the skills in the previous Social Studies Skills and Methods standard are included in the strands and evident in the Model Curriculum.
  • Each of the four strands includes a skills topic. Financial literacy is also included in economics as a skills topic (as per Ohio Revised Code requirement).
  • The revisions in “Scope and Sequence” are reflected mainly in grades 4-6, with some changes to time periods in grades 7 and 8.
  • Here is a sample format of the standards for grades PK-8. This is for grade three. (Click). First we see the Theme. For grade 3 it is Communities: Past and Present, Near and Far. (Click) Next is the Grade Description. (Click) On the left side are the Strands. This one points to the Geography strand. (Click) The Topics are different aspects of content within a strand and are integrated within the four strands. (Click) The Skills are topics introduced at the beginning of each strand and progress from grade to grade.(Click) Content Statements are essential knowledge to be learned at each grade level or within each high school course. Note that they do not begin with performance verbs.
  • The high school social studies syllabi contain a manageable number of topics per course with aligned content statements and could form the basis for end-of-course exams in a limited number of courses.The Ohio Revised Code requires three units of social studies credit for graduation from high school, including one half unit of credit in American history and one half unit of credit in American government.A World Geography course was added as a response to the public feedback.The inclusion of particular courses in the revised standards is not meant to require that all of these be offered, or to limit the choice of additional courses which districts may choose to offer in their social studies programs. And, no decision has been made at this time connecting specific courses to end-of-course exams.
  • One of the goals of the standards revision project was to create a more clear progression from grade to grade. One of the tasks of the working group was to check for horizontal and vertical alignment. Vertical alignment includes a progression of a set of related content or skill objectives from one grade level to the next. For example, here is how the U.S. Constitution is introduced and progresses through two grades and in a high school course:  For grade four, content statement 21:The Ohio Constitution and the U.S. Constitution separate the major responsibilities of government among three branches. In grade eight, content statement 20:The U.S. Constitution established a federal system of government, a representative democracy and a framework with separation of powers and checks and balances.In the high school American Government course, content statement 5:As the supreme law of the land, the U.S. Constitution incorporates basic principles which help define the government of the United States as a federal republic including its structure, powers and relationship with the governed.
  • The social studies standards directly address the 21st-century skills of civic literacy, financial and economic literacy and global awareness. Links to other 21st-century skills such as problem solving, communication, media literacy and leadership are more fully developed in the model curriculum.
  • Our content specialists, in concert with educational leaders throughout the state, will help colleagues see and understand the presence of these skills in the standards and provide opportunities to note in the strategies and resources sections of the model curriculum how these skills can enhance teaching and learning in our state.*Please note the items in RED indicate the latest revision of H.B. 153 which deleted those items. (5/4/11)
  • The Model Curriculum incorporates the academic content standards and helps to meet the goals set by the Ohio General Assembly. The Ohio Department of Education worked with educators across the state to develop the Model Curriculum. (Click)It provides curricular and instructional guidance, (Click)informs assessment that will be completed at the local and statewide levels and (Click) provides instructional strategies and resources.
  • Here is the Model Curriculum for Content Statement twelve for American History. Every content statement is aligned to a model curriculum document like the one shown in this slide. Now let’s review the components. (Click) Here is the theme which is a descriptive narrative of this high school course. (Click) Next is the topic that describes the different aspects of content within the strand.(Click) The Content Statement identifies what students should know. (Click)Content Elaborations help clarify and/or amplify the content statements to help make them more easily understood and taught.(Click)Expectations for Learning specify what students should know and be able to do. Content Statements, Content Elaborations and Expectations for Learning are what we refer to as “static” – that is, they will not change and will contribute to the development of assessments at the local and state-wide levels.Now, let’s look at what we refer to as the “fluid” part of the Model Curriculum. These will periodically change with input from Ohio teachers. (Click) Instructional Strategies, (Click) Strategies for Diverse Learners and(Click) Instructional Resources will provide guidance and support for local instructional and curricular design. This will include content-specific instructional ideas, suggestions for aligned resources, differentiated classroom ideas, and ways for students to demonstrate their learning. Although not yet developed for this content statement, Connections and Essential Questions will help teachers plan instruction around big ideas and to connect student learning within and across disciplines.
  • In their same groups, have the participants to discuss and complete the Search and Find handoutusing the Model Curriculum for grades 4 or 6 or American History. Then, have the participants share what they found.
  • Create groups of 4-5 participants organized for grades K-4, 5-8 and high school.Explain to the participants that they will be using the 4-Square handout to analyze the content statement, content elaborations and expectations for learning. Tell them, We will go through the squares one at a time to explain them and provide you with guided practice. Then, you will use the blank analysis sheet for practice in small groups. We’ll use a sample from grade 4. Distribute the model curriculum for contentstatement 4 for grade 4. Be sure to tell them that they will need to return these to you to use for other workshops.
  • Here is what a completed analysis for this content statement might look like.
  • Literacy is important in creating informed and engaged citizens. It is a natural connection to the social studies.
  • Connections should also include the Common Core for ELA & Literacy standards which sets requirements for literacy in history/social studies.ODE will develop a plan to support this effort. View the four minute video, Literacy in Other Disciplines for some helpful suggestions as it relates to social studies.
  • Social studies roll out

    1. 1. How Do You Eat An Elephant? One Bite At A Time! Science Math Social Studies ELA
    2. 2. still
    3. 3. Goals for this Presentation• Review the standard revision process• Become familiar with social studies tools• Show how the revised standards provide the basis for the Model Curricula• Understand the purposes and components of the Model Curriculum• Practice using the standards and Model Curriculum to create units and lessons for instruction
    4. 4. Goals for Social Studies Standards Revision1. Identify the most essential concepts and skills.2. Make them more user-friendly and manageable for teachers with greater depth of understanding for students.3. Provide course syllabi for high school courses.4. Provide clear progression of content from grade to grade5. Address needs of students for the 21st century
    5. 5. Goal 1: Identify the Most Essential Concepts and SkillsThis was accomplished with input from many individuals and groups including:• Teacher discussion group;• An advisory committee representing Ohio social studies stakeholder groups;• A working group consisting of teachers, professors, and curriculum supervisors;• Focus groups;• National content experts; and• Online reviews by the public.
    6. 6. Goal 2: Greater Manageability and Greater Depth of Understanding • The seven standards in the 2002 document were condensed to four strands; • Content was reorganized to reduce the amount at each grade level.
    7. 7. New Social Studies Strands
    8. 8. Ohio’s Academic Content Standards: Social StudiesStrands: Skills/Topics:• History • Historical thinking• Geography • Spatial thinking• Government • Civic participation• Economics • Economic decision making • Financial literacy
    9. 9. Revised Scope and SequencePre-K The Classroom CommunityKindergarten A Child’s Place in Time and SpaceGrade 1 Families Now and Long Ago, Near and FarGrade 2 People Working TogetherGrade 3 Communities: Past and Present, Near and FarGrade 4 Ohio in the United StatesGrade 5 Regions and People of the Western HemisphereGrade 6 Regions and People of the Eastern HemisphereGrade 7 World Studies from 750 BC to 1600 AD: Ancient Greece to the First Global AgeGrade 8 U.S. Studies from 1492 to 1877: Exploration through Reconstruction
    10. 10. Social Studies Academic ContentThemes Standards Format Grade DescriptionsStrands Skills Content Statements
    11. 11. High School Course SyllabiRequired for graduation (Ohio Revised Code)• American History• American Government Electives • Modern World History • Economics and Financial Literacy • Contemporary World Issues • World Geography
    12. 12. Goal 4: Provide Clear Progression of Content from Grade to GradeGrade Four, Content Statement 21:• The Ohio Constitution and the U.S. Constitution separate the major responsibilities of government among three branches.Grade Eight, Content Statement 20:• The U.S. Constitution established a federal system of government, a representative democracy and a framework with separation of powers and checks and balances.High School, American Government, Content Statement 5:• As the supreme law of the land, the U.S. Constitution incorporates basic principles which help define the government of the United States as a federal republic including its structure, powers and relationship with the governed.
    13. 13. Goal 5: Meet the Needs of Students for the 21st Century The social studies academic content standards directly address the 21st- century themes of: • Civic literacy; • Financial and economic literacy; and • Global awareness.
    14. 14. 21st Century Skills
    15. 15. 21st Century Skills Information, Life and Career Media and Learning and Skills Technology Skills Innovation Skills• Leadership & • Information • Critical Responsibility Literacy Thinking• Productivity & • Media Literacy • Communication Accountability • Information, • Research Communications• Flexibility & & Technology • Problem Adaptability Literacy Solving/Design• Initiative & Self- • Collaboration Direction • Meta-cognition• Social & Cross- • Creativity Cultural Skills • Innovation
    16. 16. Answer questions 1-3
    17. 17. What is the Model Curriculum? A web-based tool that: • Provides curricular and instructional guidance; • Informs assessment development; and • Includes instructional strategies and resources.
    18. 18. Search and Find• In your groups, use the Model Curriculum to answer questions 4-6• Share out
    19. 19. 4-Square ActivityActivityWe will go through the squares one at a time toexplain them, providing you with guided practice.Then, you will use the blank analysis sheet insmall groups, for practice. 22
    20. 20. 4-Square Activity Strand, topic, content statements):Strand  Topic  Content StatementAlignment tool 23
    21. 21. 4-Square Activity What must students know (knowledge – concepts, vocabulary, processes)?Knowledge  Factual  Conceptual  Procedural  Metacognitive 24
    22. 22. 4-Square Activity Thinking skillsWhat must students be able to do (performanceand skills)?What are the best way(s) for students todemonstrate what they know and can do? Demonstration 25
    23. 23. 4-Square Activity Enduring Relevant What are the significant understandings students should develop?Inferential Significant 26
    24. 24. 27
    25. 25. 4-Square ActivityDirections1. Select group members to serve as recorder, timekeeper and reporter.2. With your group, select a strand, topic and content statement that might link to the content in a unit that you brought.3. Complete Square 14. Complete the remaining squares.5. Share responses. 28
    26. 26. 4-Square ActivityThink – Pair - ShareHow can the 4-Square Activity assistin curriculum development? 29
    27. 27. Connecting Social Studies and Literacy“Creating informed, engaged citizens isarduous work. To be critical thinkers,students must be critical readers. To becritical readers, they must first be literalreaders.” Building Literacy in Social Studies Ogle, Klemp ana McBride 30
    28. 28. Literacy StandardsThe Common Core for ELA & Literacysets requirements for literacy inhistory/social studies.ODE will develop a plan to support thiseffort.Literacy in Other Disciplines videohttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zHWMfg_8r0&feature=related 31
    29. 29. How Do You Eat An Elephant? One Bite At A Time! Science Math Social Studies ELA
    30. 30. How Do You Feel After You Eat An Elephant?

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