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Motivation and emotion introduction and historical perspectives recap

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This lecture briefly reviews the Introductory and Historical perspectives lectures about motivation and emotion.

The lecture will be presented and recorded in Week 03 Wednesday 23 August 13:30-15:30 in 12B2.

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Motivation and emotion introduction and historical perspectives recap

  1. 1. 1 Motivation & Emotion James Neill Centre for Applied Psychology University of Canberra 2017 Lecture 01 and 02 recap Image source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Portrait_gemma_and_mehmet.jpg
  2. 2. 2 Lecture 01 and 02 recap: Introduction (Ch 1) History (Ch 2) (Reeve, 2015)
  3. 3. 3 Key questions  Why do we do what we do?  Why do we feel what we feel?  How can we change what we do and feel?  What causes behaviour? ● What starts, maintains, and stops behaviour?  Why does behaviour vary in its intensity?  Why do we do what we do?  Why do we feel what we feel?  How can we change what we do and feel?  What causes behaviour? ● What starts, maintains, and stops behaviour?  Why does behaviour vary in its intensity? The last two questions are based on Reeve (2015)
  4. 4. 4 What is motivation? Motivation and emotion have a common etymological root – they derive from movere (Latin for “to move”) Motivation refers to the processes that give behaviour energy and direction (Reeve, 2015). Motivation and emotion have a common etymological root – they derive from movere (Latin for “to move”) Motivation refers to the processes that give behaviour energy and direction (Reeve, 2015).
  5. 5. 5 Framework for understanding and studying motivation Based on Reeve (2015, Figure 1.4, p. 16) Antecedent conditions ● Environmental events ● Social contexts Motive status Energising, directing, and sustaining: • Behaviour • Enagement • Brain activity • Psychophysiology • Self-report Changes in life outcomes: • Performance • Achievement • Learning • Adjustment • Skill, talent • Well-being Needs Cognitions Emotions
  6. 6. 6 History of motivation Based on Reeve (2015, Ch 2) 1. Will - Ancient philosophers, Descartes 2. Instinct – Darwin, James, McDougall 3. Drive – Freud's Drive Theory, Hull's Drive Theory 4. Incentive, arousal, discrepancy 5. Mini-theories 6. Contemporary era 1. Active nature of the person 2. Cognitive revolution 3. Applied socially relevant research 1. Will - Ancient philosophers, Descartes 2. Instinct – Darwin, James, McDougall 3. Drive – Freud's Drive Theory, Hull's Drive Theory 4. Incentive, arousal, discrepancy 5. Mini-theories 6. Contemporary era 1. Active nature of the person 2. Cognitive revolution 3. Applied socially relevant research
  7. 7. 7 Next lecture  The motivated and emotional brain (Ch 03)  The motivated and emotional brain (Ch 03)
  8. 8. 8 References  Reeve, J. (2015). Understanding motivation and emotion (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.  Reeve, J. (2015). Understanding motivation and emotion (6th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
  9. 9. 9 Open Office Impress  This presentation was made using Open Office Impress.  Free and open source software.  http://www.openoffice.org/product/impress.html  This presentation was made using Open Office Impress.  Free and open source software.  http://www.openoffice.org/product/impress.html
  10. 10. 9 Open Office Impress  This presentation was made using Open Office Impress.  Free and open source software.  http://www.openoffice.org/product/impress.html  This presentation was made using Open Office Impress.  Free and open source software.  http://www.openoffice.org/product/impress.html

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