Jo Dugstad Wake

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Jo Dugstad Wake

  1. 1. Mobile, location-based games and learning Jo Dugstad Wake University of Bergen
  2. 2. Approach <ul><li>Using mobile, location-based game to develop and explore novel learning scenario </li></ul><ul><li>Location-based games have potential for designing novel learning environments, for example by the embedding of (abstract) concepts in the contexts of their actual use (Kurti, et al., 2007; Kurti, Milrad & Spikol, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>What are the conditions for learning with a location-based game </li></ul>
  3. 3. Tools <ul><li>Web-based system for creating location-based games: SILO / Premierløitnant Bielke </li></ul><ul><li>SILO: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tool for authoring location-based games </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Tying game missions to places, by annotating map. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobile app interprets data and installs game </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relies on openstreetmap.org, GPS, PyS60, Django </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Online, easy-to-use </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. “ Premierløitnant Bielke” <ul><li>Teaching and learning local history </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bergen during the Napoleonic Wars </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Trades and vocations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build gunboats by gathering the relevant parts at their production sites </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Game is a combination of the mobile/digital and actual historical sites, in their present appearance. </li></ul><ul><li>Content developed in collaboration with city inspector for the conservation of ancient artefacts </li></ul><ul><li>Uses GPS, maps, “radar”. </li></ul><ul><li>Played in groups to facilitate verbalisation of ideas </li></ul>
  5. 5. Evaluation <ul><li>Previous studies </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Usability, surveying mobile phone habits and literacy, and gaming experience, to inform design. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Memoz project: Integration of outdoors gaming with indoor classroom experience, to integrate with school activities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Current approach </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Video data, interaction analysis (Jordan & Henderson, 1995) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>From course lecture on ubiquitous technologies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5 groups of 2-3 sharing a phone </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ca. 7.5 hrs. of video materials </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Initial categorization of material (Moving, reading/discussing, orienting) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How is gaming activity manifested, topicalized by participants? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Related to learning conditions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How are available resources in the game space used? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Social, environmental and game-based </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Data example – negotiating the goal of the gaming activity

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