Russian Imperial Easter Eggs

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Russian Imperial Easter Eggs

  1. 1. Russian Imperial Easter Eggs Jasmine Cottrell History 142
  2. 2. Tradition <ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Exchanging painted eggs was a custom brought from Byzantium to Russia with Christianity. The eggs represent part of the Russian Orthodox tradition. They also represent the religious world and customs of the Russians. The resurrection of Jesus Christ was celebrated with a festival, which was the most important to Christianity. Over time materials and methods of decorating the eggs varied greatly. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Battle Scene <ul><li>This Easter egg depicts a Russian squadron storming on the fortress on Corfu. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>In the 18th-19th centuries, artistically decorated Easter eggs become widespread among the various segments of the Russian population. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Various Styles <ul><li>The decorative Easter eggs became a part of Russia’s economic, political, and cultural reforms conducted by Peter the Great. Russia began its entry into the pan-European artistic process. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Reform <ul><li>As a result of Peter the Great's reforms, new materials for Russia were introduced, such as, porcelain, glass, and papier-mache </li></ul>
  7. 7. Attributes of Christ <ul><li>Easter eggs were also decorated with attributes of Christ </li></ul>
  8. 8. Easter Eggs <ul><li>A beautiful collection of the oldest porcelain Easter eggs can be found today at the Hermitage in St. Petersburg. The collection is over 10,000 pieces. Catalogs are available for purchase online of the collection. There are also new creations of decorated Easter eggs available for purchase online. </li></ul>

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