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Data Center Transformation Program Planning and Design

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Data Center Transformation Program Planning and Design

  1. 1. Data Center Transformation Program Planning and Design<br />Service Offering Description<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />3/22/2011<br />1<br />
  2. 2. Agenda<br />Why data center transformation / cloud computing projects fail<br />The Sunnyside solution<br />Conclusion<br />3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />2<br />
  3. 3. The bottom line…<br />Data-center transformation is about significantly reducing cost to an organization, helping them shift their spending away from management and maintenance and into business projects and priorities, and also helping them address the rising cost of energy, the rising consumption of energy and the mandate to be green or sustainable.<br />These are, by no means, trivial projects. They often involve a tremendous amount of planning and affect IT, facilities, and energy planners, as well as the business leadership and line of business managers. The payoffs are potentially huge, as we'll see, from doing data center design properly, but the risks are also quite high, if things don't come out as planned.<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />3<br />
  4. 4. A wise old soothsayer once said: “The reasons for program failure are more numerous than grains of sand in the desert.”<br />3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />4<br />
  5. 5. Top Reasons for Failure<br />Transformation Initiatives / Change<br /><ul><li>Misstarts 
  6. 6. Making change an option 
  7. 7. Not involving those expected to implement the change
  8. 8. Delegated to “outsiders” 
  9. 9. No change in reward system
  10. 10. Leadership doesn't walk the talk
  11. 11. No follow-through</li></ul>(Mark Sanborn, CSP, CPAE)<br />3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />5<br />
  12. 12. Top Reasons for Failure<br />IT Programs<br /><ul><li>Poor Communication
  13. 13. Underestimating or ignoring impact of change.
  14. 14. Lack of Leadership
  15. 15. Lack of strong executive sponsorship
  16. 16. Poor project management
  17. 17. Poor Planning
  18. 18. Trying to do it cheap
  19. 19. Lack of technical knowledge
  20. 20. Lack of sound business case
  21. 21. Poor vendor management</li></ul>3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />6<br />
  22. 22. Top Reasons for Failure<br />Cloud Deployments<br /><ul><li>Failing to define “success.”
  23. 23. Failing to update computing concepts
  24. 24.  Failing to hold yourself accountable
  25. 25. Failing to scrutinize vendors
  26. 26. Failing to understand the service supply chain
  27. 27. Failure to manage and monitor applications
  28. 28.  Failing to understand financial realities
  29. 29. Failing to understand the legal complexities of the cloud
  30. 30. Failing to get off the sidelines</li></ul>3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />7<br />
  31. 31. The Gory Details<br />Project Initiation & Planning Issues<br />Unclear or unconvincing business case<br />Insufficientor non-existent approvalprocess<br />Poor definition of project scope and objectives<br />Insufficient time or money given to project<br />Lack of business ownership and accountability<br />Insufficient and/or over-optimistic planning<br />Poor estimating<br />Long or unrealistic timescales; forcing project end dates despite best estimates<br />Lack of thoroughness and diligence in the project startup phases<br />3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />8<br />
  32. 32. More Gory Details <br />Technical & Requirements Issues<br />Lack of user involvement (resulting in expectation issues)<br />Product owner unclear or consistently not available<br />Scope creep; lack of adequate change control<br />Poor or no requirements definition; incomplete or changing requirements<br />Wrong or inappropriate technology choices<br />Unfamiliar or changing technologies; lack of required technical skills<br />Integration problems during implementation<br />Poor or insufficient testing before go-live<br />Lack of QA for key deliverables<br />Long and unpredictable bug fixing phase at end of project<br />3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />9<br />
  33. 33. More Gory Details <br />Stakeholder Management & Team Issues<br />Insufficient attention to stakeholders and their needs; failure to manage expectations<br />Lack of senior management/executive support; project sponsors not 100% committed to the objectives; lack understanding of the project and not actively involved<br />Inadequate visibility of project status<br />Denial adopted in preference to hard truths<br />People not dedicated to project; trying to balance too many different priorities<br />Project team members lack experience and do not have the required skills<br />Team lacks authority or decision making ability<br />Poor collaboration, communication and teamwork<br />3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />10<br />
  34. 34. More Gory Details <br />Project Management Issues<br />No project management best practices<br />Weak ongoing management; inadequately trained or inexperienced project managers<br />Inadequate tracking and reporting; not reviewing progress regularly or diligently enough<br />Ineffective time and cost management<br />Lack of leadership and/or communication skills<br />3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />11<br />
  35. 35. The bottom line…<br /><ul><li>Note that these points are all about management, rather than technology.
  36. 36. Projects fail when expectations are not aligned with results; in a sense, that’s the definition of failure. Given the complexity of IT projects, with many moving parts distributed among a diverse group of stakeholders, it’s not surprising that expectation mismatches occur all the time.
  37. 37. Differences in expectations, goals, and priorities are substantial contributers to non-technical complexity, which is the underlying cause of most IT failures.</li></ul>3/22/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />12<br />
  38. 38. Agenda<br />Why data center transformation / cloud computing projects fail<br />The Sunnyside solution<br />Conclusion<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />13<br />
  39. 39. Our approach foundation<br />Program Design Principles<br />Tailored to Data Center and ITSM transformation<br />Takes your organization’s specific needs and requirements into account<br />Establishes clear program vision, mission and scope<br />Is milestone and metrics driven<br />Best Practices<br />Develop a rock-solid business case<br />Avoid knee jerk response to tactical business requirements<br />Ensure that we have the “bench strength” to succeed<br />Invest in the right tools and technologies<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />14<br />
  40. 40. Our approach method<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />15<br />
  41. 41. 3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />16<br />
  42. 42. Opportunity identification<br />Report answers these questions in terms of strategic impact<br />Go further with consolidation?<br />Upgrade the network architecture?<br />Upgrade the blade farm?<br />Go further with virtualization?<br />Go further with standardization?<br />Go further with service transformation?<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />17<br />
  43. 43. Performance baselining / benchmarking<br />Report answers these questions:<br />What key metrics / KPIs should we use to measure service and operations performance<br />How do we measure up?<br />Against customer expectations / SLAs<br />Against industry benchmarks<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />18<br />
  44. 44. Due-diligence design<br />Report answers these questions:<br />What is the high-level program scope, target architecture and operating model?<br />How would we phase delivery?<br />What is the CAPEX and OPEX forecast for the life of the program?<br />What do IRR / ROI and KPI factors look like at key delivery milestones?<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />19<br />
  45. 45. Identify Sponsorship and Governance<br />Report answers these questions:<br />Composition of the Program Steering Committee?<br />Composition of the Program Leadership Team?<br />Who is the Program Delivery Manager?<br />Who are the Accountable Owners?<br />Who is the Design Authority?<br />What are the main Pillars of the Program (logical groupings of similar projects )<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />
  46. 46. Conclusion – Program Success Criteria<br />Critical overarching principles must be adhered to for effective enterprise and program governance: Tiers of governance—enterprise, portfolio, and program—integrated with enterprise-wide processes for strategic planning, programming, budgeting, acquisition, and execution.<br />Distinctly defined relationships between each governance tier with clear, non-redundant roles, responsibilities, and authorities.<br />Integrated portfolio transition strategies overseen by executives responsible for that portfolio function who are in the best position to identify existing capability gaps, set priorities for investment, and adapt quickly to evolving strategic priorities and business challenges.<br />A single, transparent reporting relationship for a program manager to an oversight (program-level) governance board with executives from key stakeholder organizations empowered to make decisions, binding their organizations, and creating a partnership between the business, IT, procurement, finance, etc., while establishing accountability.<br />Timely decisions for a program in execution at the program governance level, especially as enterprises leverage modular and agile methodologies to drive smaller and more frequent incremental releases.<br />Escalation rules and paths—from program to portfolio to enterprise—for programs experiencing issues or changes that could affect a portfolio or the enterprise.<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />21<br />
  47. 47. Call to action!<br />Next Steps<br />Contact Sunnyside Associates to learn more about or Data Center Transformation Program Planning and Design Service Offering and how we can tailor it to your specific program or initiative.<br />Register to receive more information at: http://www.sunnyside-associates.net/page1.php<br />3/25/2011<br />© Copyright 2010-2011 Sunnyside Associates, LLC. All Rights Reserved.<br />22<br />

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