Collegiate Recovery Programs: Supporting Second Chances - October 2012

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The transition to a college environment can pose significant risk to a recovering student and to students at risk for alcohol/other drug problems. Many colleges and universities, including the University of Michigan, have developed programs to help recovering students maintain their recovery, excel academically and have a normative college experience apart from the culture of alcohol and other drug use. Research demonstrates exceptionally high rates of academic success and sustained recovery among students who participate in Collegiate Recovery Programs. This presentation will provide an overview of the national and local efforts to build recovery support programs on college campuses, and provide information about what parents and students should look for as they explore their options for pursuing a degree of higher education. The program is presented by Mary Jo Desprez, MA; Director of Health Promotion and Community Relations, for the University of Michigan. Mary Jo manages both the Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention Program and the Collegiate Recovery Program at the University of Michigan. She serves as the Co-Chair for both the Ann Arbor Campus and Community Coalition (A2C3), and the Michigan Campus Coalition (MC3). She is a Center Associate for the Higher Education Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Prevention (U.S Department of Education). Mary Jo has also been an adjunct instructor at Eastern Michigan University since 1997. This program is part of the Dawn Farm Education Series, a FREE, annual workshop series developed to provide accurate, helpful, hopeful, practical, current information about chemical dependency, recovery, family and related issues. The Education Series is organized by Dawn Farm, a non-profit community of programs providing a continuum of chemical dependency services. For information, please see http://www.dawnfarm.org/programs/education-series.

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  • The consequences of excessive and underage drinking affect virtually all college campuses, college communities, and college students, whether they choose to drink or not. Death: 1,825 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2009).Injury: 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009). Assault: 696,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking (Hingson et al., 2009).Sexual Abuse: 97,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape (Hingson et al., 2009).Unsafe Sex: 400,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 had unprotected sex and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex (Hingson et al., 2002).Academic Problems: About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall (Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a, 1996b;Wechsler et al., 2002).Health Problems/Suicide Attempts: More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem (Hingson et al., 2002), and between 1.2 and 1.5 percent of students indicate that they tried to commit suicide within the past year due to drinking or drug use (Presley et al., 1998).Drunk Driving: 3,360,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 drive under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009). Vandalism: About 11 percent of college student drinkers report that they have damaged property while under the influence of alcohol (Wechsler et al., 2002).Property Damage: More than 25 percent of administrators from schools with relatively low drinking levels and over 50 percent from schools with high drinking levels say their campuses have a "moderate" or "major" problem with alcohol-related property damage (Wechsler et al., 1995).Police Involvement: About 5 percent of 4-year college students are involved with the police or campus security as a result of their drinking (Wechsler et al., 2002), and 110,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are arrested for an alcohol-related violation such as public drunkenness or driving under the influence (Hingson et al., 2002).Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: 31 percent of college students met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6 percent for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in the past 12 months, according to questionnaire-based self-reports about their drinking (Knight et al., 2002).
  • The consequences of excessive and underage drinking affect virtually all college campuses, college communities, and college students, whether they choose to drink or not. Death: 1,825 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2009).Injury: 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009). Assault: 696,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking (Hingson et al., 2009).Sexual Abuse: 97,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape (Hingson et al., 2009).Unsafe Sex: 400,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 had unprotected sex and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex (Hingson et al., 2002).Academic Problems: About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall (Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a, 1996b;Wechsler et al., 2002).Health Problems/Suicide Attempts: More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem (Hingson et al., 2002), and between 1.2 and 1.5 percent of students indicate that they tried to commit suicide within the past year due to drinking or drug use (Presley et al., 1998).Drunk Driving: 3,360,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 drive under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009). Vandalism: About 11 percent of college student drinkers report that they have damaged property while under the influence of alcohol (Wechsler et al., 2002).Property Damage: More than 25 percent of administrators from schools with relatively low drinking levels and over 50 percent from schools with high drinking levels say their campuses have a "moderate" or "major" problem with alcohol-related property damage (Wechsler et al., 1995).Police Involvement: About 5 percent of 4-year college students are involved with the police or campus security as a result of their drinking (Wechsler et al., 2002), and 110,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are arrested for an alcohol-related violation such as public drunkenness or driving under the influence (Hingson et al., 2002).Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: 31 percent of college students met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6 percent for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in the past 12 months, according to questionnaire-based self-reports about their drinking (Knight et al., 2002).
  • The consequences of excessive and underage drinking affect virtually all college campuses, college communities, and college students, whether they choose to drink or not. Death: 1,825 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2009).Injury: 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009). Assault: 696,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking (Hingson et al., 2009).Sexual Abuse: 97,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape (Hingson et al., 2009).Unsafe Sex: 400,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 had unprotected sex and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex (Hingson et al., 2002).Academic Problems: About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall (Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a, 1996b;Wechsler et al., 2002).Health Problems/Suicide Attempts: More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem (Hingson et al., 2002), and between 1.2 and 1.5 percent of students indicate that they tried to commit suicide within the past year due to drinking or drug use (Presley et al., 1998).Drunk Driving: 3,360,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 drive under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2009). Vandalism: About 11 percent of college student drinkers report that they have damaged property while under the influence of alcohol (Wechsler et al., 2002).Property Damage: More than 25 percent of administrators from schools with relatively low drinking levels and over 50 percent from schools with high drinking levels say their campuses have a "moderate" or "major" problem with alcohol-related property damage (Wechsler et al., 1995).Police Involvement: About 5 percent of 4-year college students are involved with the police or campus security as a result of their drinking (Wechsler et al., 2002), and 110,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are arrested for an alcohol-related violation such as public drunkenness or driving under the influence (Hingson et al., 2002).Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: 31 percent of college students met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6 percent for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in the past 12 months, according to questionnaire-based self-reports about their drinking (Knight et al., 2002).
  • Collegiate Recovery Programs: Supporting Second Chances - October 2012

    1. 1. COLLEGIATE RECOVERY PROGRAMSSUPPORTING SECOND CHANCES Mary Jo Desprez, MA Director, Health Promotion and Community Relations University Health Service University of Michigan October 2012
    2. 2. …are aboutTHE STORIES second chances
    3. 3. WORKING A STRONG RECOVERY PROGRAM AND PURSUING A COLLEGE DEGREE SHOULD NOT BE MUTUALLY EXCLUSIVEResearch has demonstrated that for youth with substance usedisorders and/or co-occurring mental health disorders, an acutecare model of clinical intervention alone is insufficient to enableyouth to sustain treatment gains and achieve long -term recovery(SAMHSA 2009).We do know that, for youth, an environment supportive of recoveryis essential. Personal change does not happen in a vacuum, leastof all the transformation required to overcome an addiction, but itis influenced by a social context that can facilitate or impederecovery from addiction (Hser & Anglin 2011). Recovery/Relapse Prevention in Educational Settings For Youth With Substance Use & Co-occurring mental health disorders 2010 Consultative Sessions Report , U.S Dept. of Education
    4. 4. The culture creates vulnerabilityTHE CONTEXT and the institutions provide oppor tunity
    5. 5. A SNAPSHOT OF ANNUAL HIGH -RISK COLLEGE DRINKING CONSEQUENCES Death: 1 ,825 college students between the ages of 1 8 and 24 die from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2009 ). Injur y: 599,000 students between the ages of 1 8 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol ( Hingson et al., 2009). Assault: 696,000 students between the ages of 1 8 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking ( Hingson et al., 2009). Sexual A buse: 97,000 students between the ages of 1 8 and 24 are victims of alcohol -related sexual assault or date rape ( Hingson et al., 2009).
    6. 6. A SNAPSHOT OF ANNUAL HIGH -RISK COLLEGE DRINKING CONSEQUENCES Unsafe Sex: 400,000 students between the ages of 1 8 and 24 had unprotected sex and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 1 8 and 24 repor t having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex ( Hingson et al., 2002 ). Academic Problems: About 25 percent of college students repor t academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or paper s, and receiving lower grades overall ( Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a, 1996b; Wechsler et al., 2002 ). Health Problems/Suicide Attempts: More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol -related health problem ( Hingson et al., 2002 ), and between 1 .2 and 1 .5 percent of students indicate that they tried to commit suicide within the past year due to drinking or drug use (Presley et al., 1998 ). Drunk Driving: 3,360,000 students between the ages of 1 8 and 24 drive under the influence of alcohol ( Hingson et al., 2009 ).
    7. 7. A SNAPSHOT OF ANNUAL HIGH -RISK COLLEGE DRINKING CONSEQUENCES Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: 31 percent of college students met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6 percent for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in the past 12 months, according to questionnaire -based self-reports about their drinking (Knight et al., 2002).
    8. 8. THE CULTURE
    9. 9. THE SOCIAL MEDIA/MEDIA LANDSCAPE
    10. 10. Recovery An important piece of aSupport comprehensive plan
    11. 11. WHAT IS A RECOVERY COMMUNITY? Recovery communities provide a nurturing, affirming environment in which students recovering from addiction can successfully pursue academic, personal, and professional goals for the purpose of enhancing their quality of life!
    12. 12. HOW DOES A RECOVERY COMMUNITY WORK? Collegiate Recover y Communities:  Promote recovery from addiction and work to prevent relapse  Improve educational outcomes for students  Create the opportunity for a substance -free culture on campus  Emphasize social support as a mechanism for initiating positive lifestyle changes Ongoing support from a community of peers is critical to sustaining recovery over long periods of time.
    13. 13. HOW DOES A RECOVERY COMMUNITY WORK? Collegiate Recovery Communities 1. Emotional suppor t • Demonstrations of empathy, love, caring and concern • Peer-to-peer mentoring • Adult mentoring in recovery-related issues • Recovery support groups 2. Informational suppor t • Health and wellness information for recovering individuals • Educational assistance • Employment readiness • Transformation of recovering students to productive citizenship
    14. 14. HOW DOES A RECOVERY COMMUNITY WORK? Collegiate Recovery Communities 3. Instrumental suppor t • Concrete assistance in task accomplishment (i.e. securing financial aid, job placement, completing applications) • Providing direct assistance in locating housing that provides a safe environment for a recovering person • Academic advising 4. Companionship • Helping people in early recovery feel connected and enjoy being with others • Recreational activities in alcohol- and drug-free environments. (This assistance is especially needed in early recovery, when little about abstaining from alcohol or drugs is reinforcing).
    15. 15. WHAT IS HAPPENING ON CAMPUSES? To determine an estimate of the number of students on campus that could benefit from a Collegiate Recovery Community, use the following formula.Though not a scientific representation, this formula helps you to understand how prevalentsubstance abuse and addiction is on your campus. *Total number of Students Enrolled - 30,000Students Needing a Collegiate Recovery Community at a Sample UniversityNumber meeting criteria for substance abuse (31.6%) …………………………………………9,480Number of students meeting criteria for substance dependency (6%)……………….. 1,800Estimated number of students who are seeking help (4%) ………………………………451THERE ARE AN ESTIMATED 451 AT THIS COLLEGE/UNIVERSITY WHO COULD POTENTIALLY BENEFITFROM A COLLEGIATE RECOVERY COMMUNITY!*(see Knight et al., 2002 and Clements, 1999)
    16. 16. EXAMPLES OF PROGRAMS
    17. 17. STEP UP PROGRAM AUGSBURG S te p U P s e r v e s m o r e t h a n 7 5 s t u d e n t s a n n u a l l y ( m o r e t h a n 5 0 0 s i n c e i t s i n c e p t i o n ) a n d i s t h e l a r g e s t r e s i d e n t i a l c o l l e g i a te r e c o v er y p r o g r am . S te p U P s t u d e n t s ’ av e r a g e G PA i s 3 . 2 ( o f 4 . 0 ) . O v e r t h e p a s t t h r e e ye a r s , t h e S te p U P a b s t i n e n c e r a te h a s av e r a g e d 9 3 % . T h e r e i s n o a d d i t i o n a l c o s t f o r s t u d e n t s to p a r t i c i p a te i n S te p U P. M i n n e a p o l is /S t . Pa u l i s a h i g h - d e n s i t y l o c a t i o n f o r 1 2 - s te p s u p p o r t m e et i n g s.T h e S te p U P P r o g r a m a t A u g s b ur g C o l l e g e s t r i v e s to h e l p s t u d e n t s c h a m p i o n l i v e s o fr e c ov e r y, a c h i ev e a c a d e m i c s u c c e s s , a n d t h r i v e i n a c o m m un i t y o f a c c o u n t a b il i t y a n dsupport.h t t p : / / w w w. fl i c k r.c o m/ / p h oto s / a ug s b ur g c o ll e g e / s et s / 7 21 576 2 6 2 6 7 8 2 0 0 3 6 / s h ow /
    18. 18. TEXAS TECH COLLEGIATE RECOVERY COMMUNIT Y SEMINAR T WELVE-STEP MEETINGS & OTHER SUPPORT ACADEMIC SUPPORT ASSOCIATION OF STUDENTS ABOUT SERVICE (ASAS) SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM FOR RECOVERING STUDENTSRequirementsM i n imum o n e ye a r o f c o m pl ete a bs t i n e nc e fro m a l c o h ol, drug s a n d/ o r a l l pro c e s sa ddi c t i ons.On e ye a r o ut o f a t h e ra pe ut i c l i v ing e nv i ro nment .M us t e n ro l l fo r, a n d c o m pl ete, a t l e a s t 1 2 h o ur s c re di t a s a n un de rg ra dua te a n d9 h o ur s c re di t a s a g ra dua te s t ude n t w i t h a G . P. A . o f 3 . 0 o r bet te r.Sc h o l ar ships ra n g e fro m $ 5 0 0 . 0 0 to $ 5 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 pe r s e m e ster, exc l udi n g s um m ers e m ester s. Th e a m o un t o f s c h o l ar ship m o n ey re c e i ved by a s t ude n t w i l l de pe n do n t h e i r c o m m it me nt to o ur va l ue s, l e a de r ship w i t h i n t h e Co m m unit y, a n d G . P. A .
    19. 19. RUTGERS UNIVERSIT Y ADAP RECOVERY HOUSINGStudents suppor t each other’s sobriety while forming meaningfulper sonal relationships based around friendship, sobriety and theircollege experiences. Some of the unique benefits to Recover y Housingare: The Recover y House is an on -campus residence hall. There are no signs, which protects students’ anonymity. A 1 2-month housing option. Easy access to University resources such as Rutgers Health Ser vices, which includes Counseling, Alcohol & Other Drug Assistance Program & Psychiatric Ser vices (CAPS), medical ser vices, on campus 1 2 -Step meetings and recover y counseling. There is a Recover y Counselor (RC) who advises students on academic and career suppor t. Organized activities such as attendance at spor ting events and plays, hikes, bike trips, intramurals and other campus events.
    20. 20. UNIVERSIT Y OF MICHIGAN COLLEGIATE RECOVERY PROGRAMO n e ye a r o l dTh e Co l l egiate Re c ove r y P ro g ra mprov i de s: A s uppo r t i ve c o m m un it y w i t h i n t h e c a m pus c ul t ure t h a t re i n fo rc e s t h e de c i sion to di s e n gag e fro m a ddi c t i ve be h av i or s E duc a t i o nal o ppo r t un i t i e s a l o ngside re cove r y s uppo r t to e n s ure t h a t s t ude n t s do n ot h ave to s a c ri fic e o n e fo r t h e ot h e r Ac c o un t a bilit y fo r s t ude n t s i n re c over y t h a t c o m e s fro m s e l f, pe e r s , a n d h i g h er e duc a t i o n s t a f f A n o rm a t ive c o l l e ge ex pe ri e nc e fo r s t ude n t s i n re c ove r y a pa r t fro m t h e c ul t ure o f dri n k i ng/use t h a t i s pre s e n t o n to day s c a m p us e s
    21. 21. IT IS A MOVEMENT75 colleges and universities across the countryAssociation of Recovery in Higher EducationRecovery Oriented Systems of Care
    22. 22. REFERENCESAugsberg University ht tp://www.augsburg.edu/stepup/index.htmlRecover y/Relapse Prevention in Educational Settings For Youth WithSubstance Use & Co-occurring m ental health disorders 2010Consultative Sessions Repor t , U.S Dept. of EducationRutgers University, A DAP Programwww. rhscaps.rutgers.edu/ser vices/adap -recover y -housingT he Center for t he St udy of Addiction and Recover y, Texas Tech UniversityT he U.S. Depar tment of Education, Higher Education Center for Alcohol,Drug Abuse and Violence PreventionT he University of Michigan Collegiate Recover y Programhttp://www.uhs.umich.edu/recover y
    23. 23. ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED READING
    24. 24. QUESTIONS/COMMENTS maryjod@med.umich.edu 734-615-7694

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