I pv6 110607

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First of a series on IPv6. Presented June 7, 2011.

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I pv6 110607

  1. 1. IPv6 – What is it?<br />Danbury Area Computer Society<br />www.dacs.org<br />June 7, 2011<br />
  2. 2. A new Internet protocol<br />Tomorrow is World IPv6 Day<br />http://www.worldipv6day.org/<br />
  3. 3. Topics<br /><ul><li>A new Internet protocol
  4. 4. Why
  5. 5. Addressing</li></li></ul><li>A new Internet protocol<br />Replaces our old friend IPv4<br /> 67.158.96.9 - the DACS website<br />32-bit address - roughly 4 billion addresses<br />Octets (8-bits) <br />Dotted decimal notation (base 256)<br />
  6. 6. A new Internet protocol<br />Compatible – yes and not so much<br />Windows installs a dual stack by default<br />
  7. 7. A new Internet protocol<br />Doesn’t matter – it’s not available<br />
  8. 8. A new Internet protocol<br />Doesn’t matter – it’s not available<br />
  9. 9. A new Internet protocol<br />But wait… there is hope!<br />
  10. 10. A new Internet protocol<br />Shush… don’t tell Comcast support!<br />
  11. 11. Why<br />The Internet is running out of addresses<br /><ul><li>This was supposed to be an experiment!
  12. 12. Geez, 4 bytes just for the address?
  13. 13. 4 billion is not really 4 billion (class A, B, C)
  14. 14. Address waste – example: old cell phones with burned in IP address</li></li></ul><li>Why<br />The alternatives are ugly<br /><ul><li>NAT on NAT
  15. 15. Places you can’t reach
  16. 16. Fragmentation and Isolation</li></li></ul><li>Addressing<br />From Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv6_address#IPv6_address_classes<br />
  17. 17. Addressing<br />2001:ODB8:AC10:FE01:0000:0000:0000:0000<br /><ul><li>Hex values range from 00 to FF
  18. 18. “20” is one byte (8 bits) in hex
  19. 19. 4 characters (1 set) is 16 bits
  20. 20. 2 sets is 32 bits, equivalent to an IPv4 address in length
  21. 21. 8 sets represent an entire IPv6 address
  22. 22. They say the shortcuts will make this workable</li></li></ul><li>Chicken or egg<br />Is no one paying attention?<br /><ul><li>Distinct lack of IPv6-capable routers (hugh market) and don’t look for upgrades
  23. 23. No service providers or no market for service?
  24. 24. The bad guys are ready!</li></li></ul><li>Resources<br />Wikipedia – IPv6, IPv6 Addressing, IPv6 transition mechanisms<br />http://www.tcpipguide.com/free/t_InternetProtocolVersion6IPv6IPNextGenerationIPng.htm<br />http://www.dslreports.com/faq/ipvsix<br />http://www.dslreports.com/faq/9464<br />http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/IPv6_(tutorial)<br />More…<br />These slides will be posted on the website.<br />

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