TOPIC 7-
EVIDENCE FOR THE THEORY
OF EVOLUTION
DAY 1
BELL RINGER: VOCABULARY CARDS (5 MIN)
Vocabulary:
1. evolution- change over time; the process by which modern
organisms ha...
WHAT ARE WE LEARNING TODAY?
 SC.912.L.15.1 Explain the
scientific theory of
evolution is supported by
the fossil
record, ...
WHAT IS THE ESSENTIAL QUESTION?
 What are some evidences that support the theory of
evolution?
YOUR LAB HAND OUT—
YOU CAN WRITE ON THIS!
[CLOSE READ]
BACKGROUND:
 Evolution is not just a historical process; it is
occurring at this moment. Populations constan...
STATION 1
STATION 2
[STATIONS 4-8]
Station 4: Comparative Anatomy (Analogous
Structures)
Station 5: Comparative Anatomy (Vestigial
Structures)...
EVIDENCE FOR EVOLUTION
Day 2
BELL RINGER (5 MINUTE QUIZ)
 Vocabulary Quiz and EOC Question
 FINISH AND FLIP OVER!
WRITE THESE DOWN! (5 minutes)
New V...
VOCABULARY:
1. evolution- change over time; the process by which
modern organisms have descended from ancient
organisms.
2...
EOC QUESTION:
 The scientific theory of evolution is supported by different types
of evidence. The diagrams below show th...
WHAT ARE WE LEARNING TODAY?
 SC.912.L.15.1 Explain the
scientific theory of
evolution is supported by
the fossil
record, ...
FINISH LAB STATIONS!
(8 MINUTES EACH SECTION—TOTAL 40 MINUTES)
WE DO: ANALYSIS (1-5):
1. Given the amount of research and evidence available
on evolution, why is it classified as a theo...
ANALYSIS (6-10):
6. Fly embryos and frog embryos differ from each other
more than frog embryos and ape embryos do. What
do...
YOU DO: ANSWER CONCLUSION
QUESTIONS ON YOUR OWN!
CONCLUSIONS:
Explain how each of the following provides
evidence for evol...
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Origins oflifestations day1and2.ppt

  1. 1. TOPIC 7- EVIDENCE FOR THE THEORY OF EVOLUTION DAY 1
  2. 2. BELL RINGER: VOCABULARY CARDS (5 MIN) Vocabulary: 1. evolution- change over time; the process by which modern organisms have descended from ancient organisms. 2. fossil- preserved remains or traces of ancient organisms. 3. homologous structures- structures that are similar in different species of common ancestry. 4. molecular biology- A branch of biology that studies the structure and function of the macromolecules essential to life. 5. Comparative biology- A branch of biology that studies comparisons between ancestral organisms. 6. Vestigial structure- structure that is inherited from ancestors but has lost much or all of its original function VOCABULARY QUIZ FOR 5 MINUTES AT BEGINNING OF NEXT CLASS!
  3. 3. WHAT ARE WE LEARNING TODAY?  SC.912.L.15.1 Explain the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeograph y, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change.  AA (Also addresses: SC.912.N.1.3, SC.912.N.1.6 , SC.912.N.3.1, SC.912.N.3. 4)  Explain how evidences such as fossils, biochemical similarities, embryonic development, homolog ous and vestigial structures, and similarities and differences between organisms in different parts of the world are used to substantiate biological changes through time. Benchmark: LEARNING Objective:
  4. 4. WHAT IS THE ESSENTIAL QUESTION?  What are some evidences that support the theory of evolution?
  5. 5. YOUR LAB HAND OUT— YOU CAN WRITE ON THIS!
  6. 6. [CLOSE READ] BACKGROUND:  Evolution is not just a historical process; it is occurring at this moment. Populations constantly adapt in response to changes in their environment and thereby accumulate changes in the genes that are available to the species through its gene pool. In today's lab you will explore some of the evidence for evolution and will examine a few of the mechanisms through which evolution acts. In this laboratory you will review some of the classical examples used as evidence for evolution.
  7. 7. STATION 1
  8. 8. STATION 2
  9. 9. [STATIONS 4-8] Station 4: Comparative Anatomy (Analogous Structures) Station 5: Comparative Anatomy (Vestigial Structures) Station 6: Biogeography Station 7: Observable Changes Station 8: Molecular Biology
  10. 10. EVIDENCE FOR EVOLUTION Day 2
  11. 11. BELL RINGER (5 MINUTE QUIZ)  Vocabulary Quiz and EOC Question  FINISH AND FLIP OVER! WRITE THESE DOWN! (5 minutes) New Vocabulary Words For Next Class: 1. Natural Selection— process by which organisms are most suited for their environment survive and reproduce most successfully; also called the survival of the fittest. 2. Anatomy—the structure of living things. 3. Artificial selection—selective breeding of plants and animals to promote the occurrence of desirable traits in offspring. 4. Fitness—how well an organism can survive and reproduce. 5. Biogeography– the study of past and present organisms.
  12. 12. VOCABULARY: 1. evolution- change over time; the process by which modern organisms have descended from ancient organisms. 2. fossil- preserved remains or traces of ancient organisms. 3. homologous structures- structures that are similar in different species of common ancestry. 4. molecular biology- A branch of biology that studies the structure and function of the macromolecules essential to life. 5. Comparative biology- A branch of biology that studies comparisons between ancestral organisms. 6. Vestigial structure- structure that is inherited from ancestors but has lost much or all of its original function
  13. 13. EOC QUESTION:  The scientific theory of evolution is supported by different types of evidence. The diagrams below show the skeletons of two different animal species. How does comparing the skeletons of these animals provide support for the scientific theory of evolution? A. It provides information about the organisms' habitats. B. It shows possible common ancestry between organisms. C. It provides information to determine the organisms' ages. D. It shows possible chromosomal similarities between organisms. Answer :  B. It shows possible common ancestry between organisms.  Animals that evolved from a common ancestor will often have similar structures and organs.
  14. 14. WHAT ARE WE LEARNING TODAY?  SC.912.L.15.1 Explain the scientific theory of evolution is supported by the fossil record, comparative anatomy, comparative embryology, biogeography, molecular biology, and observed evolutionary change.  AA (Also addresses: SC.912.N.1.3, SC.912.N.1.6, SC.912.N.3.1, SC.912.N.3.4)  Explain how evidences such as fossils, biochemical similarities, embryonic development, homologou s and vestigial structures, and similarities and differences between organisms in different parts of the world are used to substantiate biological changes through time. Benchmark: LEARNING Objective:
  15. 15. FINISH LAB STATIONS! (8 MINUTES EACH SECTION—TOTAL 40 MINUTES)
  16. 16. WE DO: ANALYSIS (1-5): 1. Given the amount of research and evidence available on evolution, why is it classified as a theory? 2. Charles Darwin published his book On the Origin of Species in 1859. Of the different types of evidence that you have examined, which do you think he relied upon the most, and why? 3. How can Darwin legitimately argue about the imperfection of the fossil record and then go on to show how the fossil record can be used to support evolution? 4. How are mass extinctions good evidence in favor of evolution? 5. Why are transitional species, such as the ancestors of modern whales or horses, crucial evidence for evolution?
  17. 17. ANALYSIS (6-10): 6. Fly embryos and frog embryos differ from each other more than frog embryos and ape embryos do. What does this imply about how these groups may be related? 7. What are the differences between "homologous" organs and "analogous" organs? Find some examples of your own. 8. The bones of a human arm are very similar to the bones in a bird’s wing and a dolphin’s flipper. What does this similarity in structure reveal about the ancestry of these animals? 9. Even if a "rudimentary organ" actually has a function about which we observers are unaware (e.g., if vestigial pelvic bones of a whale may function to support gonads), why would it still provide excellent evidence in support of evolution by descent? 10. Explain how sequences of amino acids in proteins can be used to reveal relationships among organisms.
  18. 18. YOU DO: ANSWER CONCLUSION QUESTIONS ON YOUR OWN! CONCLUSIONS: Explain how each of the following provides evidence for evolution: 1. Fossil evidence 2. Comparative embryology 3. Comparative anatomy  homologous structures  analogous structures  vestigial structures 4. Biogeography 5. Observable changes 6. Molecular biology

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