Do We Need Better Presentations

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Why most scientific and technical presentations fail ? and how we can achieve better, successful presentations.

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  • @Jose Ramon Macias - whether its words said that do the talk or words written in the presentation that get attention is still a debatable topic.
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  • Buena suerte con tus pecadores, Jose Ramón. Si te sirve de consuelo, yo estoy en la misma situación: evangelizando día a día para conseguir que unos pocos vean la luz
    Un saludo
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  • Hi Alberto,
    I'm in charge to coordinate the seminars of the group (Biocomputing Unit at the Centro Nacional de Biotecnologia). This group includes people with computing and bio profiles, but both with little interest in communication skills... I've found this is a general situation in science, not exclusive to (although probably more severe in) Spanish scientists.
    When starting last year period of seminars I've tried to open their eyes, and make them aware of how much benefit we could achieve with just a little more effort when preparing a talk, something that is quite usual in science day-by-day activity.

    One year later I can say I partly got it... Now all of them are more conscious of making and delivering better presentations... but still, just a minority thinks is worth the effort...

    Probably this is like preaching: saving just one soul would be enough reward

    Thanks for your comments
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  • Great! You have included here some slides from your other presentations, but they are perfectly integrated. Good design. Do you present this to your colleagues?
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  • JoseRamonMaciasBiocomputinUnit
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=1208847for a PowerPoint presentation ?they are getting crazy?
  • Most scientific or technical presentations fail
  • Most scientific or technical presentations fail
  • Why ?doubt:http://www.sxc.hu/photo/734189
  • Most presentations fail
  • How much is “most” ?
  • a Gaussian distribution?How many talks do you attend in a month?When was last time you attend a good presentation?
  • a Gaussian distribution?How many talks do you attend in a month?When was last time you attend a good presentation?
  • actually 90-9-1
  • actually 90-9-1
  • Why ?doubt:http://www.sxc.hu/photo/734189
  • what we seelongboringbad slidescontent-free
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/732192nobody pays attention to boring things
  • people like to attend your talkshttp://www.sxc.hu/photo/1193817
  • present data without preparingthe audience enough
  • Overloading data
  • projecting slides that no one reads
  • slides that no one remembers
  • prepared under pressure
  • “las cuatro o cinco cosas que, a lo largo de toda una vida, he podido desaprender. Son mucho más importantes que las cosas que he aprendido”- Eduard Punset
  • Do we really need to use slides?Question mark: http://www.sxc.hu/photo/948294
  • 1. Planning
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=1014659
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=1191021
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1219898
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1120036
  • Position
  • Actionhttp://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=1174850
  • Benefithttp://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=983493
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/sonson/422595428
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1211252
  • 4. State sub-topics
  • Memorable opening
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=954267
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=226833
  • 2. Design
  • Slidesold stuff
  • Don’t be cheetah… slooowdooown and take time to create your presentation.Cheetahs may be fast (and powerful,) but have you ever seen one give an effective presentation? My guess is no. Creating a presentation isn’t a race! You need time to organize your thoughts, plan your message, and select your visuals. Which brings me to my next point…Don’t be another cheetah… pay for your images.Cheetahs never win. At least not when it comes to swiping images from the web. Take the time to search for images, and spend a little money on them. There are great stock photography sites, where you can find photos for just a few bucks. And if that’s too much, check out flickr’s Creative Commons–the photos are beautiful and FREE*. Photography will (almost) always make your presentation more interesting, but the right photography will make it more impactful.
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/264208http://blog.duarte.com/2008/12/start-with-a-pencil-not-a-mouse/
  • Rule of ThirdsThe rule of thirds is a compositional tool that makes use of the notion that the most interesting compositions are those in which the primary element is off center. Basically, take any frame of reference and divide it into thirds placing the elements of the composition on the lines in between.Visual CenterThe visual center of any page is just slightly above and to the right of the actual (mathematical) center. This tends to be the natural placement of visual focus, and is also sometimes referred to as museum height.
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=1014659
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1052392
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/20745656@N00/2761301071Contrast help to emphasize
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1152188use font sizes everybody can read
  • Ability to maintain attention is limited
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=776398presenting data is not throwing your numbers on screen
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=786463Find alternatives to tables
  • http://elartedepresentar.com/2009/01/12/%c2%bfdonde-esta-wally-en-tu-presentacion/
  • http://elartedepresentar.com/2009/01/12/%c2%bfdonde-esta-wally-en-tu-presentacion/
  • http://elartedepresentar.com/2009/01/12/%c2%bfdonde-esta-wally-en-tu-presentacion/
  • Before & AfterData:http://www.slideshare.net/Lorenita/presentacin-defensa-de-tesis
  • Some statisticsData:http://www.slideshare.net/Lorenita/presentacin-defensa-de-tesis
  • Before & AfterData:http://www.slideshare.net/Lorenita/presentacin-defensa-de-tesis
  • Some statisticsData:http://www.slideshare.net/Lorenita/presentacin-defensa-de-tesis
  • Some statisticsData:http://www.slideshare.net/Lorenita/presentacin-defensa-de-tesis
  • Some statisticsData:http://www.slideshare.net/Lorenita/presentacin-defensa-de-tesis
  • http://www.levidepoches.fr/photos/uncategorized/2008/07/02/raymond_loewy.jpg
  • Alex is the author of some of the best design teaching in the industry, including Thinking in Type, The Elements of Graphic Design, Advertising Design and Typography, Type In Use and numerous articles on typography and visual communication for all the best design publications.      He is an accomplished graphic designer who has shaped the visual design of nineteen magazines and twenty identity programs and who has been a consultant to numerous publications, art directors, and editors. He was the senior faculty member in design at the Hartford Art School of the University of Hartford for fifteen years and has lectured widely on typography and design to professionals in corporations and at conferences. His credits also include adjunct faculty at Parsons, City College of NY, and Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT).      Alex serves on the boards of several arts and civic organizations and is currently the President of the New York Type Directors Club in Manhattan
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/captkodak/271929944
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/33558Clip-art looks not professional really
  • resources
  • Nancy Duarte es la directora ejecutiva de la firma "Duarte Design" que es en la actualidad la compañía líder mundial en el diseño de presentaciones con la ayuda de diapositivas y cuyos clientes incluyen al ganador del Premio Nóbel y pasado vicepresidente de los EEUU., Al Gore, conjuntamente con la mayoría de la empresas del Valle del Silicón y muchas otras reconocidas compañías a nivel mundial.
  • Alex is the author of some of the best design teaching in the industry, including Thinking in Type, The Elements of Graphic Design, Advertising Design and Typography, Type In Use and numerous articles on typography and visual communication for all the best design publications.      He is an accomplished graphic designer who has shaped the visual design of nineteen magazines and twenty identity programs and who has been a consultant to numerous publications, art directors, and editors. He was the senior faculty member in design at the Hartford Art School of the University of Hartford for fifteen years and has lectured widely on typography and design to professionals in corporations and at conferences. His credits also include adjunct faculty at Parsons, City College of NY, and Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT).      Alex serves on the boards of several arts and civic organizations and is currently the President of the New York Type Directors Club in Manhattan
  • Erik Spiekermann (nacido el 30 de mayo de 1947) es un tipógrafoalemán y diseñador.Spiekermann estudió Historia del Arte en Universidad Libre de Berlín. Entre 1972 y 1979, trabajó como diseñador gráfico independiente en Londres antes de retornar a Berlín y fundar MetaDesign con dos socios. Los clientes de la firma incluyen a Adobe Systems, Apple Computer, Audi, Hewlett Packard, IBM, y Nike, con oficinas en Berlín, San Francisco, y Zúrich.Es arquitecto de información, diseñador de fuentes tipográficas y autor de libros y artículos sobre tipografía. Algunos de sus diseños tipográficos son: FF Meta, ITC Officina, FF Info, FF Unit, Nokia Sans, Bosch Sans et al.En 1979 funda MetaDesign, la firma de diseño más grande de Alemania, con oficinas en Berlín, Londres y San Francisco.En 1988 lanza FontShop, la primera fundidora digital y distribuidora independiente de fuentes.Es profesor honorario de la Academia de Artes de Bremen (Academy of Arts in Bremen), vice-presidente del consejo alemán de diseño (GermanDesign Council), presidente de la Sociedad Internacional de Diseñadores Tipográficos (International Society of TypographicDesigners) y miembro del directorio de ATypI. Fue presidente del Instituto Internacional de Diseño de información (International Institute of InformationDesign).En julio de 2000, se retira de la administración de MetaDesignBerlin.Vive y trabaja en Berlín, Londres y San Francisco, diseñando publicaciones (como la revista TheEconomist), sistemas complejos de diseño (como el diseño corporativo de Bosch y DB, GermanRailways) y más tipografías. Su nueva firma de diseño se llama UDN UnitedDesigners Network.
  • Deja tiempo para que la audiencia también hableNunca agotes tu tiempo. Habla un 80% o incluso menos. Deja amplio tiempo para preguntas
  • 3. Exposition
  • http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=858598
  • TinyBallerinas: http://www.flickr.com/photos/76112132@N00/164580966/
  • Dance : http://www.flickr.com/photos/sobakasu/2667547794/
  • Glowing “neon tubes” text with reflection(Intermediate) To reproduce the effects on this slide, do the following: On the Home tab, in the Slides group, click Layout, and then click Blank.On the Insert tab, in the Text group, click Text Box, and then on the slide, drag to draw the text box.Enter text in the text box, select the text, and then on the Home tab, in the Font group, select Arial Rounded MT Boldfrom the Font list, select 60 from the Font Size list, and then click Bold.On the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click Center to center the text in the text box.On the Home tab, in the Font group, click Character Spacing, and then click More Spacing. In the Font dialog box, on the Character Spacing tab, in the Spacing list, select Expanded. In the By box, enter 2.Select the text box. Under Drawing Tools, on the Format tab, in the bottom right corner of the WordArt Styles group, click the Format Text Effects dialog box launcher. In the Format Text Effects dialog box, click TextFill in the left pane, select Gradient fill in the TextFill pane, and then do the following:Click the button next to Preset colors, and then click Ocean (second row, second option from the left).In the Type list, select Linear.Click the button next to Direction, and then click Linear Diagonal (first row, first option from the left).In the Angle box, enter 45°.Also in the Format Text Effects dialog box, click Text Outline in the left pane. In the Text Outline pane, select Solid line, click the button next to Color, and then under Theme Colors click Black, Text 1 (first row, second option from the left). Also in the Format Text Effects dialog box, click Outline Style in the left pane. In the Outline Style pane, in the Width box, enter 0.75 pt. Also in the Format Text Effects dialog box, click 3-DFormatin the left pane, and then do the following in the 3-DFormatpane:Under Bevel, click the button next to Top, and then under Bevel click Hard Edge (third row, third option from the left). Next to Top, in the Width box, enter 4 pt, and in the Height box, enter 0.8 pt.Under Depth, click the button next to Color, and then under Theme Colors click Black, Text 1 (first row, second option from the left). In the Depth box, enter 4.5 pt.Under Surface, click the button next to Material, and then under Translucent click Powder (first option from the left). Click the button next to Lighting, and then under Special click Glow (third option from the left). Under Drawing Tools, on the Format tab, in the WordArt Styles group, click Text Effects, point to Glow, and then under Glow Variations click Accent color 5, 8 pt glow (second row, fifth option from the left). Under Drawing Tools, on the Format tab, in the WordArt Styles group, click Text Effects, point to Reflection, and then under Reflection Variations click Half Reflection, 4 pt offset (second row, second option from the left). Drag the text box vertically on the slide to position it slightly above the middle.Select the text box. On the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Arrange, point to Align, and then do the following:Click Align to Slide.Click Align Center. To reproduce the background on this slide, do the following: Right-click the slide background area, and then click Format Background. In the Format Background dialog box, click Fill in the left pane. In the Fill pane, select Solid fill, and then click the button next to Color, and under Theme Colors click Black, Text 1 (first row, second option from the left).
  • http://cdn-write.demandstudios.com/upload//8000/500/20/7/178527.jpg
  • PayattentionUnderstandBe abletoactupon (remember)Yourmainmessage
  • PayattentionUnderstandBe abletoactupon (remember)Yourmainmessage
  • no sleepingat your talks
  • No more boring seminarshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/aedes/627462599
  • http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1087620http://www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=1099198
  • Do We Need Better Presentations

    1. 1. Do we need betterpresentations ?<br />
    2. 2. José Ramón Macías<br />Biocomputing UnitCNB-CSIC<br />
    3. 3. my position<br />
    4. 4. GOOD-BAD examples<br />my position<br />
    5. 5. GOOD-BAD examples<br />gathering the good ones<br />my position<br />
    6. 6. GOOD-BAD examples<br />gathering the good ones<br />my position<br />your questions<br />
    7. 7. handoutsgiven<br />GOOD-BAD examples<br />gathering the good ones<br />my position<br />your questions<br />
    8. 8. Do we need betterpresentations ?<br />
    9. 9. Yes, we do<br />
    10. 10. remember ?he got one<br />
    11. 11. for a PowerPoint ?<br />got crazy ?<br />
    12. 12. most scientific-technicalpresentations fail<br />
    13. 13.
    14. 14. most scientific-technicalpresentations fail<br />
    15. 15. Why ?<br />
    16. 16. Fact !<br />Most presentations fail<br />
    17. 17. how much is“most”<br />
    18. 18. BAD<br />GOOD<br />
    19. 19. myPowerPoint<br />BAD<br />GOOD<br />
    20. 20. really bad<br />9091<br />tolerable<br />good<br />100%<br />BAD<br />GOOD<br />
    21. 21. myPowerPoint<br />BAD<br />GOOD<br />
    22. 22. Why ?<br />
    23. 23. effectivecommunicationis getting the message to the audience<br />
    24. 24.
    25. 25. we want<br />shortsimplelegibleengaging<br />we get<br />longboringbad slidesmeaningless<br />
    26. 26. nobody pays attention to boringthings<br />
    27. 27. without an audienceyou don’t have a presentation<br />
    28. 28. present data without preparingthe audience enough<br />
    29. 29.
    30. 30. projecting slides no one reads<br />
    31. 31. Seven Questions to Knowing Your Audience<br />1<br />What are they like?<br />Demographics and psychographics are a great start, but connecting with your audience means understanding them on a personal level. Take a walk in their shoes and describe what their life looks like each day. <br />2<br />Why are they here?<br />What do they think they’re going to get out of this presentation? Why did they come to hear you? Are they willing participants or mandatory attendees? This is also a bit of a situation analysis.<br />3<br />What keeps them up at night?<br />Everyone has a fear, a pain point, a thorn in the side. Let your audience know you empathize—and offer a solution.<br />Insert a representative picture or illustration of an audience member in this rectangle. It helps to put a face on the audience.<br />4<br />How can you solve their problem?<br />What’s in it for the audience? How are you going to make their lives better?<br />5<br />What do you want them to do?<br />Answer the question “so what?”—and make sure there’s clear action for your audience to take. <br />6<br />How can you best reach them?<br />People vary in how they receive information. This can include the set up of the room to the availability of materials after the presentation. Give the audience what they want, how they want it. <br />7<br />How might they resist?<br />What will keep them from adopting your message and carrying out your call to action?<br />© duarte.com 2008 <br />
    32. 32. slides that no one will remember<br />
    33. 33.
    34. 34. prepared under pressure<br />
    35. 35. we can learn<br />(with little effort)<br />
    36. 36. “las cuatro o cinco cosas que, a lo largo de toda una vida, he podido desaprender. Son mucho más importantes que las cosas que he aprendido.”<br />- Eduard Punset<br />
    37. 37. Do we reallyneedto use slides<br />
    38. 38. why we use PowerPoint,when we want to use Word<br />
    39. 39. Presentationlife cycle<br />
    40. 40. Planning<br />
    41. 41. 1. analyzing the audience<br />
    42. 42. their needs<br />
    43. 43. theirattitude<br />
    44. 44. their level ofknowledge<br />
    45. 45. environment<br />
    46. 46. demographic information<br />
    47. 47. 2. develop yourPosition-Action-Benefit<br />
    48. 48. state yourposition<br />
    49. 49. action<br />
    50. 50. theirbenefit<br />
    51. 51. 3. brainstorm for mainidea<br />
    52. 52. mainidea<br />
    53. 53. 4. statesub-topics<br />
    54. 54. 5. developintroduction&conclusions<br />
    55. 55. 5. developintroduction&conclusions<br />
    56. 56. Memorableopening<br />argument #1<br />argument #2<br />argument #3<br />Memorableclosing<br />
    57. 57. 6. find apreview / review sentencefor the main idea<br />
    58. 58. as in the saying…<br />tell them what you’re going to tell themtell themthen, tell then what you told them<br />
    59. 59. 7. develop slides or other visualaids<br />
    60. 60. 8. develophandouts<br />
    61. 61. Design<br />
    62. 62. put your old slides in a newcontainer<br />
    63. 63. this one is perfect<br />
    64. 64. Life after deathby PowerPoint<br />- DON McMILLAN<br />
    65. 65. Judo-way<br />use the slideware the<br />
    66. 66. “ Don’t be a cheetah”<br />- Paula Tesch @ Duarte.blog<br />
    67. 67. Start with a pencil, not a mouse<br />
    68. 68. Rule of Thirds<br />
    69. 69. their needs<br />
    70. 70.
    71. 71. use font types to emphasizethe message<br />
    72. 72. Contrasthelp toemphasize<br />
    73. 73. use font sizes everybodycan read<br />
    74. 74. Fact !<br />Ability to maintain attention is limited<br />
    75. 75. really !?<br />
    76. 76. Fact !<br />attention is limited at 20 minutes chunks<br />
    77. 77. Keep It Short<br />
    78. 78. But please,<br />please,<br />please,<br />keep It Simple!<br />
    79. 79. presenting data is not throwingyour numbers on screen<br />
    80. 80. there are better alternativesto tables<br />
    81. 81. 1 PB<br />NGSproduces (approx.)one giga base pair of sequence data, with files in the order of 100-200 GB.<br />1.000 TB<br />EVERY<br />RUN !!!<br />1.000.000 GB<br />1.000.000.000 MB<br />1.000.000.000.000 KB<br />1.000.000.000.000.000 byte<br />
    82. 82. WORLDWIDE DATACENTERS NOW ACTUALLY CONSUME<br />AS MUCH ENERGY AS<br />SWEDEN<br />
    83. 83.
    84. 84.
    85. 85.
    86. 86. Something to avoid: abused graphs<br />
    87. 87. rather, be creative andsearch for simplicity.<br />didn’t gave an answer<br />didn’t know what a BLOG is !!!<br />
    88. 88.
    89. 89. Some statistics…<br />thesedon’t<br />visit blogsregularly<br />
    90. 90. Blogs visitors value diversitythe most<br />uncensored<br />diversity<br />spontaneity<br />
    91. 91. Blogs visitors value diversitythe most<br />spontaneity<br />diversity<br />uncensored<br />the touch of humor here…<br />
    92. 92.
    93. 93. one tenth of the EMDB entries are virus structures<br />- February 2009<br />
    94. 94. 1 out of 3 structures are covered by more than one entry.<br />- February 2009<br />1/3<br />
    95. 95. “value in a slide is not in the amountof information that contains, but the clarity to transmitthe message.”<br />- Nancy Duarte<br />
    96. 96.
    97. 97.
    98. 98.
    99. 99.
    100. 100.
    101. 101.
    102. 102.
    103. 103.
    104. 104.
    105. 105. OK. But I’m not a <br />DISIGNER<br />Myth !<br />
    106. 106. “Design is too important to be left to designers”<br />- Raymon Loewy“The Father of Industrial Design”<br />
    107. 107. “color should be used in the same way that type and size is used: to emphasizeimportance, not decorate a page.”<br />- Alexander White<br />
    108. 108.
    109. 109. using clip-artlooks not professional, really<br />
    110. 110.
    111. 111. resources<br />in handoutslater<br />
    112. 112. red<br />When in doubt, make it If you are still in doubt, make it<br />- Ivan Chermayeff<br />big<br />
    113. 113. “From the audience&apos;s point of view, the question is: <br />Why the bloody hell does this matter? <br />Clarify that and you&apos;re on the right track.”<br />- Garr Reynolds<br />
    114. 114. “From the audience&apos;s point of view, the question is:<br />Why the bloody hell does this matter? <br />Clarify that and you&apos;re on the right track.”<br />- Garr Reynolds<br />
    115. 115. “like it or not, people are going to judge you by your cover.”<br />- Nancy Duarte<br />
    116. 116. “like it or not, people are going to judge you by your cover.”<br />- Nancy Duarte<br />
    117. 117. “color should be used in the same way that type and size is used: to emphasize importance, not decorate a page.”<br />- Alexander White<br />
    118. 118. “color should be used in the same way that type and size is used: to emphasize importance, not decorate a page.”<br />- Alexander White<br />
    119. 119. “color should be used in the same way that type and size is used: to emphasize importance, not decorate a page.”<br />- Alexander White<br />
    120. 120. “If letters are the clothes that words wear, then it surely follows that there must be as many typefacesas there are voices, languages, and emotions.”<br />- Erik Spiekermann<br />
    121. 121. “The elevator test:<br />If your audience could rememberonly three things about your presentation, what would you want it to be?.”<br />- Garr Reynolds<br />
    122. 122. “Deja tiempo para que la audiencia también hable. Nunca agotes tu tiempo. Habla un 80%o incluso menos.”<br /><ul><li> Gonzalo Álvarez Marañón</li></li></ul><li>“Deja tiempo para que la audiencia también hable. Nunca agotes tu tiempo. Habla un 80%o incluso menos.”<br /><ul><li> Gonzalo Álvarez Marañón</li></ul>elartedepresentar.com<br />
    123. 123. #3<br />Exposition<br />
    124. 124. Don’t speak fast<br />
    125. 125. Don’t speak fast<br />
    126. 126. Don’t just give ’em the facts,give ’em a show! Entertainyour audiencewhile you informthem. <br />
    127. 127. Just like dance moves, presentations need rehearsal.<br />
    128. 128. practicepracticepractice<br />
    129. 129. your<br />Benefits<br />
    130. 130. Are presentations worth the effort<br />
    131. 131. your results will<br />SHINE<br />
    132. 132. smart<br />will look<br />
    133. 133. connectwith the audience<br />
    134. 134. your message effectivelyreach the audience<br />
    135. 135. guide and keep the attention<br />
    136. 136. understand<br />your audience<br />your message<br />
    137. 137. improve comprehensionand recall<br />
    138. 138. act upon<br />your audience<br />your message<br />
    139. 139. no more napsat your talks<br />
    140. 140. no more boringseminars<br />
    141. 141. get one, too<br />
    142. 142. 99% presentations fail<br />we can learn, (with little effort) <br />they’ll take your messagehome<br />

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