Presented by Collin J. Popp, MS      January 12, 2013
•   Nutritional “reset”•   Eliminate problematic foods•   Restore health•   Re-introduce• Grains, sugar, dairy, legumes  a...
Why?• Need to meet the “Good Food Standards”  1.   Psychological response  2.   Hormonal effect of food  3.   Intact gut a...
Psychological Response• Biology: Drawn towards  salty, sweet, fatty  – Survival• Reward or Benefit  – Nutrients stripped• ...
Psychological Response                     Therapist• Cookie Jar Therapist  – Stress increases sweet consumption1• “Food i...
Hormonal Effect• Hormones = messengers• Balance hormones• 4 big ones: insulin, glucagon, leptin, cortisol  – Thyroid and V...
Hormonal Effect• “Overcarbsumption”:heart disease2 and  inflammation3  – Bread, pizza, rolls, cereals• Cow’s milk insulino...
Gut Integrity
Gut Integrity• Example: Lectins (anti-nutrient)  – Found in cereal grains and legumes  – Increase gut permeability5 + gut ...
Gut Microbiota• Digestion, absorption, synthesis• Preserve gut homeostasis, regulate energy  Altered: obesity7, inflammati...
Inflammation• Inflammation = immune self-protection• Associated with obesity, cancer, and arthritis• Foods stimulate overa...
Fish Oil Doesnt fix a poor diet!
Meat, Seafood, Eggs• Protein (and fat)  – Essential amino acids• Skin, hair, tendons, muscles, enzymes, hormon  es, antiox...
Meat, Seafood, EggsSources                         ExamplesMeat: ruminants, wild game      Beef, bison, goat, elk, lambMea...
Myth Dispelled• Meat = saturated fat = cholesterol = heart  disease  – false• “Old Science,” observational13 and associati...
No significant evidence! Am J Clin Nutr, 2010
Vegetables & Fruits• Water-soluble vitamins, trace minerals,  antioxidants• Root vegetables: great carbohydrate source• Ve...
Top Vegetables & FruitsTomato                   BeetsSpinach                  ParsnipsWatercress               AsparagusOn...
Fats• Saturated  Fats, Monounsaturated, Polyunsaturated• Saturated Fat:    – Cell membranes, brain function• Cooking fat &...
Fats• Monounsaturated:  – “Good” fats  – Control blood pressure, cholesterol  – Cold, raw fat & cook low heat             ...
Fats• Polyunsaturated  – Omega-3: ALA, EPA and DHA  – Omega-6: LA  – Nuts & seeds    Best         Moderation      Limit   ...
Getting Started1.   Read, learn and research2.   Tools3.   Prepare4.   Action5.   Repeat
Meal Planning                ISWF Meal Planning Template
Meal Planning• Breakfast upon waking• Eat every 3-4 hours    – 3 meals per day•   Limit snacks•   Sit & enjoy food•   Make...
Other Tips• Sleep  – 7-10 hrs; dark, cold rm; no caffeine/exercise, avoid    bright lights• Training/Exercise  – “We have ...
Post-Workout•   No supplements post-workout (i.e whey protein)•   Eat within 1 hr after workout•   Consume lean protein so...
Being Successful•   Patience•   Adapt/Struggle•   Enjoy•   Positive•   Eat smart•   Prepare•   Environment
Resources Books                           Cookbooks It Starts With Food - Hartwig   Practical Paleo – Sanfilippo The Paleo...
• Start: January 14, 2013• End: February 12, 2013• 30 days…that’s it.• No cheats, excuses, slip-ups, no scale, no  measure...
What to Expect• Week 1: fatigue, “carb flu”, cravings• Week 2: increase energy, sleep; possible  digestive issues• Week 3:...
Table 1: Eliminated FoodsGrains               Sugar/Sweeteners     Dairy                 LegumesWheat, barley, rye   High-...
Table 2: Eliminated Foods     Also avoid     Carrageenan, MSG, sulfites     White, red, purple, blue potatoes     Paleo Tr...
Treats
Table 3: Good to Go!Foods to consumeClarified butter or GheeFruit Juices (i.e. orange, apple)Green beans, sugar snap peas,...
Re-IntroduceAfter 30 days are over:Day 1: Dairy products – evaluateDay 4-5: Gluten-containing grains– evaluateDay 7-8: Non...
QUESTIONS??        Contact:       Collin Popp     (402)681-9811Collin.popp@gmail.com
References1.   Kim Y, Yang HY, Kim AJ, Kim Y. Academic stress levels were associated with sweet food     consumption among...
References9.    Ghanim H, Abuaysheh S, Sia CL, Korzeniewski K, Chaudhuri A, et al. (2009) Increase in plasma      endotoxi...
Whole30 Seminar Slideshow
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  • Good morningThanksBackground + nutrition
  • Why is there a blank slide?We need to wipe our beliefs, ideas of nutrition clean—most of what people hear, say is incompletely or completely false.So lets start over… Therefore, I give you the Whole30
  • Reset button in the form of a lifestyle change
  • Want to meet standards. Why?Standards: a level of qualitity.Example:
  • What are 2 key things in this slide?Biologically drawn towards foods. However, much of the food we eat today lacks the nutrietns we need for surivivalReward out does the benefit.Satiety and satiation: signals are lostSatiety: intestines; actual foodsSatiation: brain; “fullness”-- estimated
  • What are two key things with this slide?Reward  rewiringCookie Jar Therapist: stress response is eating those “feel good” foods that are sweet, fatty and delicious but NOT nutritious! Emotional eating, stress rewarded by food. We want to avoid emotional eating, and stress but also avoid those “bad” foods.Kim Y, Yang HY, Kim AJ, Kim Y. Academic stress levels were associated with sweet food consumption among Korean high-school students. Nutrition. 2013; 20(1)): 213-8.
  • Talk about each hormone
  • Draw a flow chart and connect all of these2.Aljada A, Friedman J, Ghanim H, Mohanty P, Hofmeyer D, Chaudhuri A, Dandona P. Glucose ingestion induces an increase in intranuclear nuclear factor kappaB, a fall in cellular inhibitor kappaB, and an increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha messenger RNA by mononuclear cells in healthy human subjects. Metabolism. 2006;55(9):1177–11853. Quiner, Trevor E., et al. "Soy Content of Basal Diets Determines the Effects of Supplemental Selenium in Male Mice." The Journal of nutrition 141.12 (2011): 2159-2165.4. Messina M & Redmond G. “Effects of soy protein and soybean isoflavones on thyroid function in healthy adults and hypothyroid patients: a review of the relevant literature.” Thyroid. 2006; 16(3): 249-58.
  • Open to the environment.Food is not “in” the body until it is absorbed: depends on the intestintinal cells (enterocytes) and their function.Barrier: let good in and keep bad outTightly regualted for digestion and absorptionKeep toxins and bacteria outRelease hormones, and enzymes: PYY and CKK
  • Increase gut pearmeability barrier is brokem inflammation  systemic inflammation of the body 5.Liener IE. “Nutritional signficance of lectins in the diet. In The Lectins: Properties, Functions and Applications in Biology and Medicine. Acad Press. 1986: 527-52.6. Banwell JG et al. “Bacterial overgrowth by indigenous microflora in the phytohemagglutinin-fed rat.” Canadian J Microbio. 1988; 34:1009-13.
  • Forgotten organFunctions of gut bacteria NOT encoded in our genesLarge intestine7. Cani PD, Delzenne NM, Amar J, Burcelin R (2008) Role of gut microflora in the development of obesity and insulin resistance following high-fat diet feeding. PatholBiol (Paris) 56: 305–309.8.Cani PD, Bibiloni R, Knauf C, Waget A, Neyrinck AM, et al. (2008) Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes in mice. Diabetes 57: 1470–1481.
  • Inflammation: body’s immune response to injury, bacterial infection, forgein substance. Acute and local then good to go!Mention acute and local. Chronic and systemic (whole body)C-reactive protein: testImmune system always in a battle!9. GhanimH, Abuaysheh S, Sia CL, Korzeniewski K, Chaudhuri A, et al. (2009) Increase in plasma endotoxin concentrations and the expression of Toll-like receptors and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in mononuclear cells after a high-fat, high-carbohydrate meal: implications for insulin resistance. Diabetes Care 32: 2281–2287.Want at 3:1 or 1:! RatioDecrease n6 is a great way to lower inflammation10.Patterson E, Wall R, Fitzgerald GF, RP Ross, Stanton C. Health Implications of High Dietary Omega-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid. 2011
  • Published earlier this week. Can’t cover up a poor diet with supplements.Cardiomyopathy: heart muscle dysfucntion, calcifaication, hardening of the heart valve and muscles.11. Jeckel KM, Veeramachaneni DNR, Chicco AJ, Chapman PL, Mulligan CM, et al. (2012) Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation Does Not Improve Western Diet-Induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51994.
  • Mention that each food doesn’t just have one nutrient,vitmain, mineral in it. You can’t look at a piece of chicken and say this is only protein. I cant do that for fats eighter. People look at bacon like its all saturated fat, in fact it has oleic acid in it—the same fat predominately found in olive oil. Does this give me a reason to eat it? Not all the time.Essential amino acids: 9 methionine and BCAAs important
  • 12.Hartwig. ISWF. 2012
  • Disconnect b/w dietary SFA an serum SFA, serum palmitate is largely from endogenous synthesis from CHOs, and palmitate is toxic whey is it the only FA we evolved to store.Saturated fat does increase cholesterolBut high cholesterol does not lead to heart diseaseOnly association not cause effectHeart disease and refined carbohdyartes have stronger relationship14. Christopher E. Ramsden, Joseph R. Hibbeln, Sharon F. Majchrzak and John M. Davis (2010). n-6 Fatty acid-specific and mixed polyunsaturate dietary interventions have different effects on CHD risk: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. British Journal of Nutrition, 104, pp 1586-1600. doi:10.1017/S0007114510004010. 13. Jakobsen MU et al. “Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies.” Am J ClinNutr. 2009;89(5):1425-32.15. Liu s et al. “A prospective study of dietary glycemic load, carbohydarte intake, and risk of coronary heart disease in US women.” Am J ClinNutr. 2000;71(6):1455-61.
  • Meta-analysis: common measure of effect size..looking at a larger population by pooling a number of scienctific studies. Give inside as to the data, and effects.16. Siri-Tarino et al. “Meta-anyalysis of prospective cohort studies evalutating the assocaition of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease1-5.” Am J ClinNutr. 2009
  • Not limited to JUST these
  • Discuss the benefits of MCTs—brieflyDifference btw clarified butter and ghee
  • Unstable at higher tempsCold and raw: no cooking b/c they have
  • Limit those nut buttersPeanut butter =
  • Clean out kitchen, separate food from others if you live with someone who is NOT doing a whole30Time savers, slow cooker, pressure cooker, food processorAlways be thinking of next meals—not just meal!Action: grocery shop, eating out
  • Supplementation:There’s no recreating what nature makes
  • Questions about this informationNow for the challenge outline
  • Encourage you to take some measurements before hand, take a picture of yourself in the mirror.NO scaleONE thing: you must take a picture of each meal you make—take at least 1 picture a day.
  • A few things we are going to do:Email: focus groups—questionaires!Resources—meetings
  • Carageenan: inflammatory and increases gut permeabilityMSG: obesity and leptin resistanceSulfities: sulferdixiode, potassium bisulfite; dried fruits and wines; food allergen
  • Gheevs clarified butter: Ghee- class of clarified butter-> cooked longer, remove moisture, milk solids brown and fat is strained out.Clarifed butter: melt butter allow fats and proteins to separate; evaporation. Rendered milk fat—no proteins
  • Keep in mind after 30 days you don’t have to stop. You can keep going!No magical number here
  • Whole30 Seminar Slideshow

    1. 1. Presented by Collin J. Popp, MS January 12, 2013
    2. 2. • Nutritional “reset”• Eliminate problematic foods• Restore health• Re-introduce• Grains, sugar, dairy, legumes and alcohol• Disease, low nutrients, anti- nutrients
    3. 3. Why?• Need to meet the “Good Food Standards” 1. Psychological response 2. Hormonal effect of food 3. Intact gut and balanced gut microbiota 4. Absence of inflammation
    4. 4. Psychological Response• Biology: Drawn towards salty, sweet, fatty – Survival• Reward or Benefit – Nutrients stripped• Rewire
    5. 5. Psychological Response Therapist• Cookie Jar Therapist – Stress increases sweet consumption1• “Food is more than just a mode of transportation for nutrients into the body.”
    6. 6. Hormonal Effect• Hormones = messengers• Balance hormones• 4 big ones: insulin, glucagon, leptin, cortisol – Thyroid and Vitamin D• Food directly influences hormones – Example: insulin drives nutrients into cells
    7. 7. Hormonal Effect• “Overcarbsumption”:heart disease2 and inflammation3 – Bread, pizza, rolls, cereals• Cow’s milk insulinogenic• Soy linked to hypothyroidsim4
    8. 8. Gut Integrity
    9. 9. Gut Integrity• Example: Lectins (anti-nutrient) – Found in cereal grains and legumes – Increase gut permeability5 + gut bacteria imbalance6 – Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), Crohn’s Disease
    10. 10. Gut Microbiota• Digestion, absorption, synthesis• Preserve gut homeostasis, regulate energy Altered: obesity7, inflammation8
    11. 11. Inflammation• Inflammation = immune self-protection• Associated with obesity, cancer, and arthritis• Foods stimulate overacting immune system9 – Example: Unbalanced omega-6:omega-3 ratio – Omega-3 (EPA/DHA) = anti-inflammatory – Omega-6 (LA) = proinflammatory10 • i.e. Canola, soybean, corn oils
    12. 12. Fish Oil Doesnt fix a poor diet!
    13. 13. Meat, Seafood, Eggs• Protein (and fat) – Essential amino acids• Skin, hair, tendons, muscles, enzymes, hormon es, antioxidants, antibodies• Fat-soluble vitamins & minerals – Vitamins A, E, D and iron, magnesium, B12
    14. 14. Meat, Seafood, EggsSources ExamplesMeat: ruminants, wild game Beef, bison, goat, elk, lambMeat: poultry Chicken, duck, turkey, quailSeafood Salmon, tuna, herring, squid, scallops, oysters, lobster, shrimpEggs ChickenOrgans and Bones Liver, kidney, heart, marrow, bone broth• Raised? and feed? – Grass-fed > Organic/natural > Industrial• Bacon, deli meats, beef jerky Modified from ISWF, pp143
    15. 15. Myth Dispelled• Meat = saturated fat = cholesterol = heart disease – false• “Old Science,” observational13 and association• Heart disease & omega-6 fats14 & refined carbohydrates15 – Linked to heart disease
    16. 16. No significant evidence! Am J Clin Nutr, 2010
    17. 17. Vegetables & Fruits• Water-soluble vitamins, trace minerals, antioxidants• Root vegetables: great carbohydrate source• Vegetables > fruits
    18. 18. Top Vegetables & FruitsTomato BeetsSpinach ParsnipsWatercress AsparagusOnions, shallots ChardCarrots Leeks, GarlicCabbage, red/green Greens, mustard/collardBok Choy KaleCauliflower BroccoliSweet Potatoes Bell PeppersKiwi BlackberriesPlums BlueberriesGrapefruit RaspberriesCherries MelonsApricots Strawberries Modified from ISWF, pp 155,158
    19. 19. Fats• Saturated Fats, Monounsaturated, Polyunsaturated• Saturated Fat: – Cell membranes, brain function• Cooking fat & High heat: more stable• Medium-chain Triglycerides (MCTs)MCTs/Saturated Fat Animal Fats/Saturated FatsCoconut Oil, coconut butter Duck, ghee, clarified butterCoconut milk/meat Tallow, lard, goat Modified from ISWF, pp 172, 174
    20. 20. Fats• Monounsaturated: – “Good” fats – Control blood pressure, cholesterol – Cold, raw fat & cook low heat Monounsaturated Fats Olives, olive oil Avocado, avocado oil Hazelnuts Macadamia nuts, oil Modified from ISWF, pp 167
    21. 21. Fats• Polyunsaturated – Omega-3: ALA, EPA and DHA – Omega-6: LA – Nuts & seeds Best Moderation Limit Cashews Almonds Flax Seeds Hazelnuts Brazil Nuts Pine Nuts Macadamias Pecans Pumpkin Seeds Pistachios Sesame seeds Sunflower Seeds Walnuts Modified from ISWF, pp 175
    22. 22. Getting Started1. Read, learn and research2. Tools3. Prepare4. Action5. Repeat
    23. 23. Meal Planning ISWF Meal Planning Template
    24. 24. Meal Planning• Breakfast upon waking• Eat every 3-4 hours – 3 meals per day• Limit snacks• Sit & enjoy food• Make time• No food before bed time
    25. 25. Other Tips• Sleep – 7-10 hrs; dark, cold rm; no caffeine/exercise, avoid bright lights• Training/Exercise – “We have brains so we can move.” – Functional• Vitamin D – Sun exposure and foods (animal) – Example: cod liver oil• Social – Be with others, laugh, enjoy life!
    26. 26. Post-Workout• No supplements post-workout (i.e whey protein)• Eat within 1 hr after workout• Consume lean protein sources + vegetables/fruits• Extra serving vegetables/fruits in post-workout meal – Best carbohydrates: root vegetables, dried fruits, fruit juices. • Glycogen synthesis
    27. 27. Being Successful• Patience• Adapt/Struggle• Enjoy• Positive• Eat smart• Prepare• Environment
    28. 28. Resources Books Cookbooks It Starts With Food - Hartwig Practical Paleo – Sanfilippo The Paleo Solution - Wolf Everyday Paleo - Fragoso The Paleo Diet - Cordain Paleo Slow Cooker - Gower Primal Blueprint - Sission Well Fed - Joulwan The New Evolutionary Diet- Eat Like A Dinosaur – Paleo DeVany Parents• Handouts and links online
    29. 29. • Start: January 14, 2013• End: February 12, 2013• 30 days…that’s it.• No cheats, excuses, slip-ups, no scale, no measurements for 30 days!• Whole9life.com
    30. 30. What to Expect• Week 1: fatigue, “carb flu”, cravings• Week 2: increase energy, sleep; possible digestive issues• Week 3: health history & habits; physically & mentally better
    31. 31. Table 1: Eliminated FoodsGrains Sugar/Sweeteners Dairy LegumesWheat, barley, rye High-Fructose Corn Cheese Red, pinto, black, Syrup refried, navy, white, kidney, lima beansMillet Glucose, sucrose Milk, 1%, 2%, Soy, soybeans, soy whole, raw sauce, miso, tofu, edamameSorghum Cane sugar Whey & Casein Peanuts, peanut Protein butterCorn (Maize) Sucralose Butter, even grass- Peas, chickpeas fedQuinoa, amaranth, Maple syrup, Yogurt, Greek Lentilsbulgur, buckwheat honey, agave nectarOats Equal, Splenda, Cream Soy lecithin Stevia, NutrasweetGluten-free Kefirproducts
    32. 32. Table 2: Eliminated Foods Also avoid Carrageenan, MSG, sulfites White, red, purple, blue potatoes Paleo Treats/desserts• Carrageenan: seaweed, thickener• Monosodium Glutamate (MSG): enhance flavor• Sulfites: preservative
    33. 33. Treats
    34. 34. Table 3: Good to Go!Foods to consumeClarified butter or GheeFruit Juices (i.e. orange, apple)Green beans, sugar snap peas, snow peasVinegarCoconut milk, almond milkCanned olives, tomato sauce, tomato pasteBone brothApplesauce
    35. 35. Re-IntroduceAfter 30 days are over:Day 1: Dairy products – evaluateDay 4-5: Gluten-containing grains– evaluateDay 7-8: Non-gluten grains—evaluate – Rice, quinoaDay 10-11: legumes—evaluateNo magical number…Whole35, Whole60. You cankeep going.
    36. 36. QUESTIONS?? Contact: Collin Popp (402)681-9811Collin.popp@gmail.com
    37. 37. References1. Kim Y, Yang HY, Kim AJ, Kim Y. Academic stress levels were associated with sweet food consumption among Korean high-school students. Nutrition. 2013; 20(1)): 213-8.2. Aljada A, Friedman J, Ghanim H, Mohanty P, Hofmeyer D, Chaudhuri A, Dandona P. Glucose ingestion induces an increase in intranuclear nuclear factor kappaB, a fall in cellular inhibitor kappaB, and an increase in tumor necrosis factor alpha messenger RNA by mononuclear cells in healthy human subjects. Metabolism. 2006;55(9):1177–1185.3. Quiner, Trevor E., et al. "Soy Content of Basal Diets Determines the Effects of Supplemental Selenium in Male Mice." The Journal of nutrition 141.12 (2011): 2159-2165.4. Messina M & Redmond G. “Effects of soy protein and soybean isoflavones on thyroid function in healthy adults and hypothyroid patients: a review of the relevant literature.” Thyroid. 2006; 16(3): 249-58.5. Liener IE. “Nutritional signficance of lectins in the diet. In The Lectins: Properties, Functions and Applications in Biology and Medicine. Acad Press. 1986: 527-52.6. Banwell JG et al. “Bacterial overgrowth by indigenous microflora in the phytohemagglutinin-fed rat.” Canadian J Microbio. 1988; 34:1009-13.7. Cani PD, Delzenne NM, Amar J, Burcelin R (2008) Role of gut microflora in the development of obesity and insulin resistance following high-fat diet feeding. Pathol Biol (Paris) 56: 305–309.8. Cani PD, Bibiloni R, Knauf C, Waget A, Neyrinck AM, et al. (2008) Changes in gut microbiota control metabolic endotoxemia-induced inflammation in high-fat diet-induced obesity and diabetes in mice. Diabetes 57: 1470–1481.
    38. 38. References9. Ghanim H, Abuaysheh S, Sia CL, Korzeniewski K, Chaudhuri A, et al. (2009) Increase in plasma endotoxin concentrations and the expression of Toll-like receptors and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 in mononuclear cells after a high-fat, high-carbohydrate meal: implications for insulin resistance. Diabetes Care 32: 2281–2287.10. Patterson E, Wall R, Fitzgerald GF, RP Ross, Stanton C. Health Implications of High Dietary Omega- 6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid. 2011.11. Jeckel KM, Veeramachaneni DNR, Chicco AJ, Chapman PL, Mulligan CM, et al. (2012) Docosahexaenoic Acid Supplementation Does Not Improve Western Diet-Induced Cardiomyopathy in Rats. PLoS ONE 7(12): e51994.12. Hartwig D. It Starts With Food. 2012.13. Christopher E. Ramsden, Joseph R. Hibbeln, Sharon F. Majchrzak and John M. Davis (2010). n-6 Fatty acid-specific and mixed polyunsaturate dietary interventions have different effects on CHD risk: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials. British Journal of Nutrition, 104, pp 1586- 1600. doi:10.1017/S0007114510004010.14. Jakobsen MU et al. “Major types of dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: a pooled analysis of 11 cohort studies.” Am J Clin Nutr. 2009;89(5):1425-32.15. Liu s et al. “A prospective study of dietary glycemic load, carbohydarte intake, and risk of coronary heart disease in US women.” Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;71(6):1455-61.16. Siri-Tarino et al. “Meta-anyalysis of prospective cohort studies evalutating the assocaition of saturated fat with cardiovascular disease1-5.” Am J Clin Nutr. 2009

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