FICPA - What Sureties Want To See In Financial Statements

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FICPA - What Sureties Want To See In Financial Statements

  1. 1. What Sureties Want To See In Wh t S ti W t T S I Financial Statements October 28, 2010 John Reed, CPA, CCIFP Construction and Real Estate Group Principal, LarsonAllen LLP Nick Costa Account Executive, The Travelers Companies, Inc. ©2010 LarsonAllen LLP P1
  2. 2. Surety Financial Statement Users • Sureties are some of the most sophisticated users of contractor financial statements • Sureties need construction industry specific information in their underwriting process. • Construction financial statements should go beyond the minimum GAAP required disclosures and present th additional i f d t the dditi l information useful t ti f l to sureties. Allen LLP ©2010 LarsonA2
  3. 3. Presentation For Surety Use • Financial Statements Break Out Items Needed For Surety Credit Analysis – Construction Industry Specific Note Disclosures ◊ Accounts receivable and retainage by open and closed jobs ◊ Outstanding bonds, backlog, pass through entity book tax differences – Supplemental information ◊ Completed and uncompleted job schedules that reconcile to construction revenue and costs on the income statement ◊ Detailed schedules of construction costs, general and administrative Allen LLP expenses, other income and expense ©2010 LarsonA3
  4. 4. Example Balance Sheet Sections 2010 2009 ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and Cash Equivalents $ 183,000 $ 245,000 Securities Available-for-Sale 555,000 400,000 Accounts Receivable: Current Billings on Contracts 2,945,000 2,270,000 Retainages on Contracts 380,000 380 000 260,000 260 000 Other 125,000 40,000 Allowance for Uncollectible Accounts (100,000) (30,000) Costs and Estimated Earnings in Excess of Billings on Uncompleted Contracts 550,000 400,000 Inventories 165,000 165 000 90,000 90 000 Prepaid Expenses 37,000 32,000 Deferred Income Taxes 15,000 12,000 Total Current Assets 4,855,000 3,719,000 OTHER ASSETS Notes Receivable - Officers 70,000 50,000 Investment in Joint Venture 75,000 50,000 Securities Held-to-Maturity 260,000 250,000 Allen LLP Cash Value of Life Insurance, Less Policy Loans of $30,000 and $20 000 Respectively $30 000 $20,000, 80,000 80 000 60,000 60 000 ©2010 LarsonA Total Other Assets 485,000 410,0004
  5. 5. Example Balance Sheet Sections 2010 2009 LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS EQUITY CURRENT LIABILITIES Current Maturities of Long-Term Debt $ 773,000 $ 917,000 Accounts Payable: Current 1,640,000 1,564,000 Retainage R t i 600,000 600 000 500,000 500 000 Billings in Excess of Costs and Estimated Earnings on Uncompleted Contracts 450,000 120,000 Accrued Expenses 475,000 350,000 Income Taxes Payable 110,000 10,000 Total Current Liabilities 4,048,000 3,461,000 LONG-TERM LIABILITIES Long Term Long-Term Debt (Less Current Maturities) 407,000 303,000 Deferred Income Taxes 100,000 50,000 Total Long-Term Liabilities 507,000 353,000 Allen LLP Total Liabilities 4,555,000 4 555 000 3,814,000 3 814 000 ©2010 LarsonA STOCKHOLDERS EQUITY5
  6. 6. Sureties Adjust Working Capital and Equity For Credit Purposes Example Determination of Working Capital for Surety Credit Current Assets Current Assets - GAAP $ X,XXX Subtract Receivables from officers, employees, owners (XXX) Adjustment to marketable securities (XXX) Some % of inventory that is not on a job site (XXX) Prepaid expenses (XXX) Deferred tax assets (XXX) Add Cash surrender value of life insurance XXX Current Assets - Surety Credit Purposes X,XXX Current Liabilities Current Liabilities - GAAP (X,XXX) Allen LLP ©2010 LarsonA Adjusted Working Capital for Surety Credit $ X,XXX6
  7. 7. Example Balance Sheet Sections 2010 2009 ASSETS CURRENT ASSETS Cash and Cash Equivalents $ 183,000 $ 245,000 Securities Available-for-Sale 555,000 400,000 Accounts Receivable: Current Billings on Contracts 2,945,000 2,270,000 Retainages on Contracts 380,000 380 000 260,000 260 000 Other 125,000 40,000 Allowance for Uncollectible Accounts (100,000) (30,000) Costs and Estimated Earnings in Excess of Billings on Uncompleted Contracts 550,000 400,000 Inventories 165,000 165 000 90,000 90 000 Prepaid Expenses 37,000 32,000 Deferred Income Taxes 15,000 12,000 Total Current Assets 4,855,000 3,719,000 OTHER ASSETS Notes Receivable - Officers 70,000 50,000 Investment in Joint Venture 75,000 50,000 Securities Held-to-Maturity 260,000 250,000 Allen LLP Cash Value of Life Insurance, Less Policy Loans of $30,000 and $20 000 Respectively $30 000 $20,000, 80,000 80 000 60,000 60 000 ©2010 LarsonA Total Other Assets 485,000 410,0007
  8. 8. Example Income Statement 2010 2009 AMOUNT PERCENT AMOUNT PERCENT CONTRACT REVENUES EARNED $ 18,500,000 100.0 % $ 12,500,000 100.0 % CONTRACT COSTS 16,280,000 88.0 11,050,000 88.4 CONTRACT GROSS PROFIT 2,220,000 12.0 1,450,000 11.6 GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSE 1,340,000 7.2 1,135,000 9.1 INCOME FROM OPERATIONS 880,000 4.8 315,000 2.5 OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE) Income from Joint Venture 35,000 0.2 10,000 0.1 Gain (Loss) on Sale of Equipment 15,000 0.1 (10,000) (0.1) Investment Income 10,000 0.1 - - Interest Expense (145,000) (0.8) (140,000) (1.1) Realized Gain (Loss) on Sale of Securities (20,000) (20 000) (0.1) (0 1) (10,000) (10 000) (0.1) (0 1) Total Other Income (Expense) (105,000) (0.6) (150,000) (1.2) INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES 775,000 4.2 165,000 1.3 Allen LLP PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES 315,000 , 1.7 60,000 , 0.5 ©2010 LarsonA NET INCOME $ 460,000 2.5 $ 105,000 0.88
  9. 9. Example Statement of Stockholders’ Equity Unrealized Gains Common Retained (Losses) on Stock Earnings Securities Total BALANCE, BALANCE JANUARY 1 2009 1, $ 50,000 50 000 $ 1 485 000 1,485,000 $ 5,000 5 000 $ 1 540 000 1,540,000 COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Net Income - 105,000 - Other Comprehensive Income, Net of Tax: Unrealized Losses on Securities: Unrealized Holding Gains Arising During the Year (Net of $1,000 Deferred Income Tax) - - 5,000 Total Comprehensive Income 110,000 BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2009 , , 50,000 1,590,000 10,000 1,650,000 COMPREHENSIVE INCOME Net Income - 460,000 - Other Comprehensive Income, Net of Tax: Unrealized Losses on Securities: Unrealized Holding Gains Arising During the Year (Net of $5,000 Deferred Income Tax) - - 15,000 Total Comprehensive Income 475,000 Allen LLP Sale of 200 Shares to an Employee for Cash 10,000 10 000 - - 10,000 10 000 ©2010 LarsonA BALANCE, DECEMBER 31, 2010 $ 60,000 $ 2,050,000 $ 25,000 $ 2,135,0009
  10. 10. Example Statement of Cash Flows 2010 2009 CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES Cash Received from Contracts $ 17,955,000 $ 12,630,000 Cash Paid to Suppliers and Employees (17,134,000) (12,345,000) Interest Paid (145,000) (140,000) Income Taxes Paid (173,000) (65,000) Cash Provided by Operating Activities 503,000 80,000 CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES Payments for Purchase of Equipment and Vehicles (410,000) (180,000) Proceeds from Sale of Equipment and Vehicles 50,000 20,000 Increase in Cash Value of Life Insurance (30,000) (10,000) Advances of Note Receivable - Officers (20,000) (50,000) Purchase of Investments (235,000) (100,000) Proceeds from Sale of Investments 80,000 200,000 Proceeds on Joint Venture Distribution 10,000 - Investment in Joint Venture - (40,000) Cash Used by Investing Activities (555,000) (160,000) CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES Proceeds from Long-Term Borrowings 330,000 100,000 Payments on Long-Term Debt (150,000) (80,000) Net Proceeds from (Payments on) Short-Term Borrowings (210,000) 200,000 Proceeds from Life Insurance Policy Loans 10,000 10 000 - Proceeds from Sale of Common Stock 10,000 - Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities (10,000) 220,000 NET INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH Allen LLP EQUIVALENTS (62,000) 140,000 ©2010 LarsonA Cash and Cash Equivalents - Beginning of Year 245,000 105,000 CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS - END OF YEAR $ 183,000 $ 245,00010
  11. 11. Example Statement of Cash Flows 2010 2009 RECONCILIATION OF NET INCOME TO CASH PROVIDED BY OPERATING ACTIVITIES Net Income $ 460,000 $ 105,000 Adjustments to Reconcile Net Income to Cash Provided by Operating Activities: Depreciation 350,000 300,000 (Gain) Loss on S l of E i (G i ) L Sale f Equipmentt (15,000) (15 000) 10,000 10 000 Realized (Gain) Loss on Sale of Securities 20,000 10,000 Income from Joint Venture (35,000) (10,000) Accretion on Securities Held-to-Maturity (10,000) - Deferred Income Taxes 42,000 5,000 (Increase) Decrease in: Contract Accounts Receivable (725,000) 150,000 Costs and Estimated Earnings in Excess of Billings on Uncompleted Contracts (150,000) 60,000 Inventories (75,000) (20,000) Other Current Assets (90,000) (30,000) Increase (Decrease) in: Accounts Payable 176,000 (375,000) Billings in Excess of Costs and Estimated Earnings on Uncompleted Contracts 330,000 (80,000) Allen LLP Accrued Expenses 125,000 (10,000) Income Ta es Pa able Taxes Payable 100,000 100 000 (35,000) (35 000) ©2010 LarsonA Cash Provided by Operating Activities $ 503,000 $ 80,00011
  12. 12. Example Accounting Policy Disclosures NOTE 1 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES Companys Business and Operating Cycle The C Th Company operates primarily as a general contractor i h t i il l t t in heavy and i d t i l construction i d industrial t ti in Florida. The work is performed under cost-plus-fee contracts, fixed price contracts, fixed price contracts modified by incentive and penalty provisions and unit price contracts. These contracts are obtained through a competitive bidding process and vary in size and duration. The contracts are undertaken by the Company alone or in partnership with other contractors through joint ventures. The Company, as conditions for entering into construction contracts, has provided surety bonds approximating $7,300,000 at December 31, 2010 and $5,000,000 at December 31, 2009. These bonds are collateralized by the contracts receivable. The length of the Company s contracts varies but is typically less than two years Accordingly assets Company’s years. Accordingly, to be realized and liabilities to be liquidated within the operating cycle are classified as current assets and liabilities. Consolidation The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Sample Contracting Company, Inc. and subsidiary after elimination of all significant intercompany accounts and transactions. Variable Interest Entities Allen LLP The Company is the p p y primary beneficiary of Sample LLC, which q y y p , qualifies as a variable interest entity y ©2010 LarsonA (VIE). The determination was based on the fact that there is common control, and that the Company is the primary tenant of Sample, LLC. The Company rents warehouse and office space.12
  13. 13. Example Contracts Receivable PolicyNOTE 1 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED) Contracts Receivable Contracts receivable from performing construction are based on contracted prices. The Company provides an allowance for doubtful collections which is based upon a review of outstanding receivables, historical collection information and existing economic conditions. Normal contracts receivable are d N l t t i bl due 30 d days after th i ft the issuance of the invoice. C t t f th i i Contract retentions are due 30 days after completion of the project and acceptance by the owner. Receivables past due more than 120 days are considered delinquent. Delinquent receivables are written off based on individual credit valuation and specific circumstances of the customer. Allen LLP ©2010 LarsonA13
  14. 14. Example Pass Through Entity Tax Disclosures NOTE 1 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES (CONTINUED) Income Taxes The Company elected to be taxed as an S Corporation for federal and state income tax purposes and, therefore, therefore is not taxed as a separate entity As such the Company’s taxable income or loss is included in entity. such, Company s the stockholders’ individual income tax return. Therefore, no provision for income taxes related to the Company’s income is included in the financial statements. The Companys income tax returns are subject to review and examination by Federal and state authorities. The tax returns for the years 2008 to 2010 are open to examination by Federal and state authorities. y p y The Company recognizes income from long-term construction contracts on the percentage-of-completion method for financial statement purposes and on the completed contract method for tax reporting purposes. The Company’s S Corporation income tax return depreciates property and equipment using accelerated lives and methods of depreciation. The depreciation, certain leasehold improvements, and differences in the recognition of profit on uncompleted contract are allowed as expenses and income in different years years. The cumulative amounts of these differences between tax and financial statement methods of accounting are summarized as follows as of December 31, 2010 and 2009: 2010 2009 Retained Earnings, Accompanying Financial Statements $ 500,000 $ 400,000 Allowance for Doubtful Accounts 50,000 50 000 60,000 60 000 Difference Between Book and Tax Gross Profit Recognition (250,000) (200,000) Net Fixed Asset Value Difference for Tax Purposes (70,000) (65,000) Tax Return Accumulated Retained Income (Loss) $ 230,000 $ 195,000 Allen LLP The anticipated shareholder Federal tax liability on deferred items at December 31, 2010 and 2009 was 31 ©2010 LarsonA $95,000 and $70,000, respectively. It is expected that a distribution of $100,000 will be made in 2011 to provide the shareholder funds needed for his 2010 individual income tax liability.14
  15. 15. Example Accounts Receivable Disclosure NOTE 2 CONTRACT ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE AND CONTRACT CONCENTRATIONS Contract accounts receivable consist of the following as of December 31: 2010 2009 Completed Contracts $ 1,810,000 $ 1,410,000 Contracts in Progress 1,135,000 860,000 Retained on Completed Contracts 215,000 140,000 Retained on Contracts in Progress 165,000 120,000 3,325,000 2,530,000 Less: Allowance for Uncollectible Accounts 100,000 30,000 Total, Net $ 3,225,000 $ 2,500,000 Contract revenues from two contracts in 2010 and one different contract in 2009, in Desoto County, Florida, represented approximately 25% and 24%, respectively, of total contract revenues for the years ended December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. No other contracts represented greater than 10% of the total contract revenues in 2010 and 2009. The contract accounts receivable from these contracts were $1,166,000 and $800,000 as of December 31, 2010 and 2009, respectively. $ , , $ , , , p y Accounts Receivable Ageing At December 31, 2010 0 to 30 31 to 60 61 to 90 Retained Total Allen LLP Completed Contracts $ 1,685,000 $ 50,000 $ 75,000 $ 215,000 $ 2,025,000 Contracts In Progress 1,100,000 1 100 000 10,000 10 000 25,000 25 000 165,000 165 000 1,300,000 1 300 000 ©2010 LarsonA $ 2,785,000 $ 60,000 $ 100,000 $ 380,000 $ 3,325,00015
  16. 16. Example Backlog Note NOTE 5 BACKLOG The Companys backlog on signed contracts as of December 31, 2010 and 2009 is as follows: 2010 2009 Contract Revenues: Backlog Balance, Beginning of Year $ 4,500,000 $ 2,000,000 New Contracts and Contract Adjustments 21,200,000 15,000,000 Contract Revenue Earned (18,500,000) (12,500,000) Backlog Balance, End of Year $ 7,200,000 $ 4,500,000 Contract Costs: Backlog Balance, Beginning of Year $ 3,980,000 $ 1,720,000 New Contracts and Contract Adjustments 18,770,885 13,310,000 Contract Costs Incurred (16,280,000) (11,050,000) Backlog Balance, End of Year $ 6,470,885 $ 3,980,000 The Company has additional contract revenue backlog of $93,000 with associated costs of $93 000 $65,000 on one contract signed and contract revenue backlog of $8,600,000 with associated costs of $7,480,000 on one contract awarded, but not signed, during the period January 1, 2011 through March 4, 2011. Allen LLP As of December 31 2010 and 2009 contract costs of approximately $655,000 and 31, 2009, $655 000 ©2010 LarsonA $850,000 included in the above cost backlog are for subcontractors.16
  17. 17. Example Joint Venture Note NOTE 6 JOINT VENTURE On June 30, 2008, the Company entered into a 40% interest joint venture with ABC Contractor on the Metropolitan Industrial Complex in Charlotte County, Florida. The joint venture is recorded on the equity basis and at December 31, 2010 and 2009, the balance consisted of the original investment of $40,000 plus unremitted joint venture income. Summary financial data of the joint venture is as follows: 2010 2009 ASSETS Cash $ 45,000 $ 30,000 Contract Receivables - Current Billings 126,500 90,000 Contract Retainage 25,000 5,000 Costs and Estimated Earnings in Excess of Billings on Uncompleted Contracts 1,000 5,000 Total Assets $ 197,500 $ 130,000 LIABILITIES AND PARTNERS EQUITY Accounts Payable - Regular $ 10,000 $ 5,000 Accounts Payable - Retainage - - Total Liabilities 10,000 5,000 Partners Equity Sample Contracting Company, Inc 75,000 50,000 ABC Contractor 112,500 75,000 Total Partners Equity 187,500 125,000 q y Total Liabilities and Partners Equity $ 197,500 , $ 130,000 , OPERATIONS Contract Revenues $ 300,000 $ 200,000 Contract Costs 167,500 140,000 Allen LLP Gross Profit 132,500 60,000 Non-Contract Expenses o Co ac pe ses 45,000 5,000 35,000 ©2010 LarsonA Net Income $ 87,500 $ 25,000 The contract has been completed in January 2011. The joint venture anticipates the investment will be distributed to the partners in mid-2011.17
  18. 18. Example Notes Payable Disclosure NOTE 7 NOTE PAYABLE - BANK The Company has a bank line of credit available through May 1, 2011 for maximum working capital borrowings of $2,000,000. The borrowings are secured by inventories, accounts receivable, general intangibles and property and equipment. The interest rate is 1.0% 1 0% over prime The Companys stockholders have personally guaranteed the borrowings prime. Company s borrowings. The line of credit agreement contains covenants related to certain financial ratios. Payable to: Security 2010 2009 $2,000,000 renewable line of credit to Bank. Monthly installements of interest only at LIBOR Accounts plus 1.5% (which was 6.3% at December 31 1 5% 6 3% 31, Receivable, Receivable 2010). Includes various financial covenants which Inventory, were in compliance at December 31, 2010. Property and Renews 5/2011. Equipment $ 766,000 $ 1,085,000 Note Payable to Financial Institution, Monthly Installments of $586, Including Principal and Certain Interest at 6 25% Matures 3/2013 6.25%, Equipment 414,000 414 000 135,000 135 000 Total 1,180,000 1,220,000 Less: Current Maturities of Long-Term Debt (773,000) (917,000) Long-Term Debt, Net of Current Maturities $ 407,000 $ 303,000 The shareholders have personally guaranteed the above borrowings. Maturity requirements on long-term debt as of December 31, 2010 are as follows: Allen LLP Year Ending December 31, Amount 2011 $ 783 000 783,000 ©2010 LarsonA 2012 407,00018
  19. 19. Example Contract Notes NOTE 8 CONTRACTS IN PROGRESS The XXX open job had costs and estimated earnings in excess of billings at December 31, 2010 resulting from an approved change order of approximately $ pp g pp y $750,000 that was included in the contract price of the , p job but was not billed until after the 2010 year end. The approved change order was the return by the school district of some of the direct material purchase allowance deducted from the contract for that job. There are additional change orders requested by the Company on that job totaling approximately $350,000 that are in dispute. The disputed change orders are not included in the jobs revenues, billings or contract price at December 31, 2010. Cost to date and total estimated cost for that job include the cost of p , j the work performed for both the approved and unapproved change orders. NOTE 9 SIGNIFICANT REVISION IN CONTRACT ESTIMATE Revisions in estimated contract profits are made in the y p year in which circumstances requiring the revision q g become known. During 2010, a design flaw was discovered in the XXX School job being built by the Company. Management estimates that correction of the design flaw will reduce the contracts gross profit by $500,000. This change in estimate reduced 2010 net income by $150,000. No other contracts were affected by the design flaw, and the Company expects to complete the school during 2011. Allen LLP ©2010 LarsonA19
  20. 20. Example Contingency Note NOTE 10 COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES The Company maintains and pays certain of its insurance under retrospective insurance policies. As of December 31, 2010, the Company has an outstanding irrevocable letter of credit expiring December 31, 2011, of $500,000 issued in favor of the Companys workers compensation insurance carrier. The Company is a defendant on claims relating to matters arising in the ordinary course of their construction business. Certain of the claims are insured but subject to varying deductibles and certain of the claims are uninsured. The amount of liability, if any, from the claims cannot be determined with certainty, however, management is of the opinion that the outcome of the claims will not have a material adverse impact on the Company’s financial position. A claim for $180,000 has been filed against the Company and its bonding company arising out of the , g p y g p y g failure of a subcontractor of the Company to pay its suppliers. In the opinion of counsel and management, the outcome of this claim will not have a material effect on the Companys financial position, results of operations or cash flows. The Company has commitments for p p y purchases of equipment at December 31, 2010 of $120,000. q p , $ , Allen LLP ©2010 LarsonA20
  21. 21. Example Management Continuity and Related Party Notes NOTE 11 STOCKHOLDER NOTES PAYABLE The Company had a note payable to a Shareholder in the amount of $450 000 at December 31, 2010. $450,000 31 2010 The note is unsecured and bears interest at the prime rate (which was 5.3% at December 31, 2010). The stockholder has subordinated repayment on the note to the outstanding surety bond obligations issued on the Company’s behalf by The Travelers Companies, Inc. NOTE 12 BUY-SELL AGREEMENT The stockholders and the Company have a buy-sell agreement. In the event of a stockholder’s death, t e Co pa y as t e opt o the Company has the option to redeem t e app cab e shares of common stoc at a p ce dete edee the applicable s a es o co o stock price determineded under the terms of the agreement. The Company carries $1,000,000 of life insurance on each stockholder to partially or completely fund this agreement. Any remaining balance is to be paid in five equal annual installments with interest at 8%. NOTE 13 RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS The Company has made advances to officers of $20,000 and $50,000 in 2010 and 2009, respectively. These advances are unsecured and bear interest at prime. Interest income was $5,000 and $4,000 for Allen LLP the years 2010 and 2009, respectively. y , p y ©2010 LarsonA21
  22. 22. Other Example NotesNOTE 14 OPERATING LEASE AGREEMENTS The Company leases office facilities from a shareholder under a noncancelable operating lease. The lease is for five years with an option to renew under the same terms for an additional fi years. T t l rent expense under thi operating l ith ti t d th t f dditi l five Total t d this ti lease was $36,000 for 2010 and 2009. Future minimum rent commitments under this facility lease are as follows: Year Ending December 31, Amount 2011 $ 36,000 2012 36,000 2013 6,000 Total $ 78,000NOTE 15 MANAGEMENT’S PLAN FOR REORGANIZATION Subsequent to year end, Management developed a plan to recapitalize the Company. The Company implemented its plan by reducing payroll through staff eliminations and pay reductions, putting new procedures in place to better control change orders, and through an infusion of paid in capital in the amount of $300,000 from the existing shareholders. Additional significant contracts for new work have been signed since year end (see Note 5). Allen LLP ©2010 LarsonA22
  23. 23. Supplemental Information Contract schedules should tie to income statement STATEMENTS OF INCOME YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010 AND 2009 2010 2009 AMOUNT PERCENT AMOUNT PERCENT CONTRACT REVENUES EARNED $ 18,500,000 100.0 % $ 12,500,000 100.0 % CONTRACT COSTS 16,280,000 88.0 11,050,000 88.4 CONTRACT GROSS PROFIT 2,220,000 12.0 1,450,000 11.6 SCHEDULE I - EARNINGS FROM CONTRACTS IN 2010 FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010 Cost Of Revenues Revenues Gross Earned Earned Profit Contracts Completed During 2010 $ 14,550,000 $ 12,730,000 $ 1,820,000 Contracts In Progress Allen LLP At Year End 3,950,000 3,550,000 400,000 ©2010 LarsonA $ 18,500,000 $ 16,280,000 $ 2,220,00023
  24. 24. Job Schedules SCHEDULE OF PERCENTAGE OF CONTRACTS IN PROGRESS AT DECEMBER 31, 2010 Year Ended December 31, 2010 At December 31, 2010 Cost & Billings Estimated In Excess Total Estimated Earnings In Of Cost & Contract Estimated Gross Revenues Cost of Gross Billings Excess Of Estimated Job # Contract Price Cost Profit Earned Revenues Profit To Date Billings Earnings 4 Underbilled Job $ 7,850,000 $ 7,056,885 $ 793,115 $ 2,780,972 $ 2,500,000 $ 280,972 $ 2,230,972 $ 550,000 $ - 5 Overbilled Job 3,300,000 2,964,000 336,000 1,169,028 1,050,000 119,028 1,619,028 - 450,000 $ 11,150,000 $ 10,020,885 $ 1,129,115 $ 3,950,000 $ 3,550,000 $ 400,000 $ 3,850,000 $ 550,000 $ 450,000 SCHEDULE OF COMPLETED CONTRACTS YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010 Contract Totals Before January 1, 2010 Year Ended December 31, 2010 Contract Cost of Gross Revenues Cost of Gross Revenues Cost of GrossJob # Contract Price Revenues Profit Earned Revenues Profit Earned Revenues Profit 1 Completed Job $ 10,000,000 $ 8,000,000 $ 2,000,000 $ 5,000,000 $ 4,000,000 $ 1,000,000 $ 5,000,000 $ 4,000,000 $ 1,000,000 2 Completed Job 5,000,000 4,730,000 270,000 - - - 5,000,000 4,730,000 270,000 Allen LLP 3 Completed Job 4,550,000 4,000,000 550,000 - - - 4,550,000 4,000,000 550,000 ©2010 LarsonA $ 19,550,000 $ 16,730,000 $ 2,820,000 $ 5,000,000 $ 4,000,000 $ 1,000,000 $ 14,550,000 $ 12,730,000 $ 1,820,00024
  25. 25. Contract Cost and Overhead Breakdown SCHEDULE OF CONTRACT COSTS AND GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSE YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2010 AND 2009 2010 2009 AMOUNT PERCENT AMOUNT PERCENT CONTRACT COSTS Materials $ 5,250,000 28.4 % $ 4,500,000 36.0 % Labor 4,625,000 25.0 3,000,000 24.0 Subcontract Expense p 3,325,000 , , 18.0 1,236,000 , , 9.9 Employee Benefits 1,295,000 7.0 810,000 6.5 Payroll Taxes 465,000 2.5 310,000 2.5 Equipment Rental 625,000 3.4 565,000 4.5 Gas, Fuel, Oil 375,000 2.0 354,000 2.8 Depreciation 320,000 1.7 275,000 2.2 Total Contract Costs $ 16 280 000 16,280,000 88.0 88 0 % $ 11 050 000 11,050,000 88.4 88 4 % GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSE Salaries and Wages, Office $ 768,000 4.2 % $ 646,000 5.2 % Payroll Taxes 40,000 40 000 0.2 02 39,000 39 000 0.3 03 Employee Benefits 75,000 0.4 70,000 0.6 Retirement Plan Contribution 50,000 0.3 40,000 0.3 Office Facilities Expense 300,000 1.6 300,000 2.4 Office Supplies and Expense 7,000 0.0 5,000 0.0 Allen LLP Provision for Uncollectible Accounts 70,000 0.4 10,000 0.1 Depreciation 30,000 30 000 0.2 02 25,000 25 000 0.2 02 ©2010 LarsonA Total General and Administrative Expense $ 1,340,000 7.2 % $ 1,135,000 9.1 %25
  26. 26. Example Consolidating Schedules Sample ASSETS Contracting Company, Inc. Sample LLC Eliminations ConsolidatedCURRENT ASSETS Cash and Equivalents $ 180,000 $ 3,000 $ - $ 183,000 Securities Available-for-Sale 555,000 - - 555,000 Contract Receivables, Net of Allowance 3,225,000 - - 3,225,000 Accounts Receivable Other 250,000 - (125,000) 125,000 Inventory 165,000 - - 165,000 Costs and Estimated Earnings in Excess of Billings on Uncompleted Contracts 550,000 - - 550,000 Prepaid Expenses 33,000 4,000 - 37,000 Deferred Income Taxes 15,000 - - 15,000 Total Current Assets 4,973,000 7,000 (125,000) 4,855,000PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT Property and Equipment 2,795,000 - - 2,795,000 Accumulated Depreciation (1,435,000) - - (1,435,000) Net Property and Equipment 1,360,000 - - 1,360,000OTHER ASSETS Management Fee Receivable - 3,000,000 (3,000,000) - Allen LLP ©2010 LarsonA26

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