BSERVETEACHER’S GUIDE                                                                                                     ...
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BSERVE                                                                                                                    ...
TEACHER’S GUIDE                                                                                                O          ...
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BSERVE                                                                                                              O     ...
BSERVETEACHER’S GUIDE                                                                                                     ...
TEACHER’S GUIDE                                                                                                      O    ...
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Primary Resources @ the Library of Congress
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Primary Resources @ the Library of Congress

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Primary Resources @ the Library of Congress

  1. 1. BSERVETEACHER’S GUIDE O Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theAnalyzing Books & ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFLOther Printed Texts columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the source. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you see. · What do you notice rst? What was the purpose of this text? · Who created What do you wonder about...· Is there any text you can read? What does it say? it? · Who do you think was its audience? · Can you who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?· Describe anything you see on the page besides tell anything about what was important at the time itwords, such as images or decorations. · How is the was made? · What tools and materials were used totext and other information arranged on the page? · create it? · What is the larger story or context withinDescribe anything about this text that looks strange which this was printed? · What can you learn fromor unfamiliar. · What other details can you see? examining this? · If someone created this today, what would be di erent?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Have students choose a section of the text and put it in their own Examine a section of the text. Think about what you already know sources, go to words. about this period in history. How does the text support or contradict http://www.loc.gov/teachers your current understanding of this period? Can you see any clues to Intermediate the point of view of the person who created this text? Look for clues to the point of view of the person, or people, who created this text. Discuss what someone with an opposing or di ering point of view might say about the issues or events described in it. How would the information be presented di erently? LOC.gov/teachers
  2. 2. BSERVE O Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theTEACHER’S GUIDE ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFLAnalyzing Manuscripts columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the manuscript. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you see. · What do you notice rst? Why do you think this manuscript was made? · Who What do you wonder about...· How much of the text can you read? What does do you think created it? · Who do you think was who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?it say? · What do you see that looks strange or intended to read it, if anyone? · What do you thinkunfamiliar? · How are the words arranged? · What was happening when it was created? · What toolsdo you notice about the page the writing appears and materials were used to create it? · What can you learn from examining this? · If someone createdthe page besides writing? · What other details can something like this today, what would be di erent? ·you see? What would be the same?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Have students choose a section of the manuscript and put it in their Examine a section of the manuscript. Think about what you already sources, go to own words. know about this period in history. How does the manuscript support http://www.loc.gov/teachers or contradict your current understanding of this period? Can you Intermediate see any clues to the point of view of the person who created this Select a section of a manuscript. Speculate about the purpose of the manuscript? manuscript, and what the person, or people, who created it expected it to accomplish. Do you think it achieved their goals? Explain why you think so. LOC.gov/teachers
  3. 3. BSERVE O Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theTEACHER’S GUIDE ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFLAnalyzing Maps columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the source. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you see. · What do you notice Why do you think this map was made? · Who do you What do you wonder about... rst? · What size and shape is the map? · What think the audience was for this map? · How do you who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?graphical elements do you see? · What on the map think this map was made? · How does it compare tolooks strange or unfamiliar? · Describe anything current maps of this place? · What does this map tellthat looks like it does not belong on a map. · What you about what the people who made it knew andplace or places does the map show? · What, if any, what they didn’t? · If this map was made today, whatwords do you see? would be di erent? · What would be the same?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Have students write a brief description of the map in their Search for maps of a city or state from di erent periods, then sources, go to own words. compile a list of changes over time and other di erences and http://www.loc.gov/teachers similarities between the maps. Intermediate Study three or more maps of a city or state at di erent time periods. Arrange them in chronological order. Discuss clues to the correct sequence. LOC.gov/teachers
  4. 4. BSERVE O Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theTEACHER’S GUIDE ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFLAnalyzing Motion Pictures columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the source. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you see and hear. · What do you What was the purpose of this motion picture? · Who What do you wonder about...notice rst? · Do you only see live action, or are do you think created it? · Who are the people who who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?there any special e ects or animation? · Describe appear in it? · What tools and materials were usedany words you see on the screen. · What do you to create it? · Do you think it was lmed on location,notice about the length of the motion picture? · or was there a stage set? · Who do you think wasDoes anything about it seem strange or unusual? · the intended audience? · What feelings or ideas doWhat other details do you notice? you think its creators wanted to communicate? · If someone created this motion picture today, what would be di erent?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Have students write a brief description of the motion picture in their Think about what you already know about this period in history. sources, go to own words. How does this motion picture support or contradict your current http://www.loc.gov/teachers understanding of this period? Intermediate Speculate about the purpose of the motion picture and what its creators expected it to accomplish. Do you think the motion picture achieved their goals? Explain why you think so. LOC.gov/teachers
  5. 5. BSERVE O Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theTEACHER’S GUIDE ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFLAnalyzing Oral Histories columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the source. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you notice. · What do you notice What was the purpose of this oral history? · What do What do you wonder about... rst? · Are any words unfamiliar to you? · Do you you think was happening when it was recorded? · who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?notice any accent? · What format is used for the What can you tell about the person telling theoral history you are examining now? (An audio story, and about that persons point of view? · Whatrecording, video or film, or a written transcript) · Does is the significance of this oral history? · Is it moreit seem like an interview or a conversation? · Do you personal or historical? · How does encounteringnotice any background noises? · What other this story firsthand change its emotional impact? · Whatdetails do you notice? can you learn from this oral history?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Have students write a brief retelling of the oral history Think about what you already know about the time period sources, go to in their own words. events described in this oral history. How does this oral history http://www.loc.gov/teachers support, contradict, or add to your current understanding of the Intermediate period or events? How could you verify this account? Speculate about the purpose of the oral history. What do you think the person telling the story, and the person recording it, expected it to accomplish? Do you think it succeeded? Explain why you think so. LOC.gov/teachers
  6. 6. TEACHER’S GUIDE O BSERVE Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theAnalyzing Photographs ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFL& Prints columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the image. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you see. · What do you notice rst? Why do you think this image was made? · What’s What do you wonder about...· What people and objects are shown? · How happening in the image? · When do you think it who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?are they arranged? · What is the physical setting? was made? · Who do you think was the audience for· What, if any, words do you see? · What other this image? · What tools were used to create this?details can you see? · What can you learn from examining this image? · What’s missing from this image? · If someone made this today, what would be di erent? · What would be the same?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Write a caption for the image. Have students expand or alter textbook or other printed sources, go to explanations of history based on images they study. http://www.loc.gov/teachers Intermediate Select an image. Predict what will happen one minute after the scene shown in the image. One hour after? Explain the reasoning behind your predictions. LOC.gov/teachers
  7. 7. BSERVE O Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theTEACHER’S GUIDE ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFLAnalyzing Political Cartoons columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the source. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you see. · What do you notice Whats happening in the cartoon? · What was What do you wonder about... rst? · What people and objects are shown? · What, happening when this cartoon was made? · Who do who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?if any, words do you see? · What do you see that you think was the audience for this cartoon? · Whatlooks different than it would in a photograph? · What issue do you think this cartoon is about? · Whatdo you see that might refer to another work of art or do you think the cartoonists opinion on this issue is?literature? · What do you see that might be a What methods does the cartoonist use to persuadesymbol? · What other details can you see? the audience?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Think about the point the cartoonist was trying to make with Select a political cartoon. Think about the point of view of the sources, go to this cartoon. Were you persuaded? Why or why not? cartoonist. Describe or draw how the cartoon might be different http://www.loc.gov/teachers if it had been created by a cartoonist with a different point of view. Intermediate Compare two political cartoons that are on the same side of an issue. Identify the different methods — like symbols, allusions, or exaggeration — that the two cartoons use to persuade their audience. LOC.gov/teachers
  8. 8. BSERVE O Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theTEACHER’S GUIDE ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFLAnalyzing Primary Sources columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the source. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:What do you notice rst? · Find something small Where do you think this came from? · Why do you What do you wonder about...but interesting. · What do you notice that you think somebody made this? · What do you think who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?didn’t expect? · What do you notice that you can’t was happening when this was made? · Who do youexplain? · What do you notice now that you didn’t think was the audience for this item? · What toolearlier? was used to create this? · Why do you think this item is important? · If someone made this today, what would be di erent? · What can you learn from examining this?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Have students compare two related primary source items. Ask students to consider how a series of primary sources support sources, go to or challenge information and understanding on a particular topic. Intermediate http://www.loc.gov/teachers Have students re ne or revise conclusions based on their study of Have students expand or alter textbook explanations of history each subsequent primary source. based on primary sources they study. LOC.gov/teachers
  9. 9. BSERVETEACHER’S GUIDE O Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theAnalyzing Sheet Music ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFL& Song Sheets columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the source. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you see on the cover. · What kind What was the purpose of this piece of music? · Who What do you wonder about...of design or image is printed on the document? do you think composed it? · Who do you think was who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?· Does anything on the page look strange or intended to sing or play it? · What does the cover tellunfamiliar? · What names or places appear in the you about the music? · If it doesn’t have lyrics, whatlyrics? · Do you see anything on the page besides instruments were intended to play it? · If you knowwriting? · What other details do you notice? · If the melody, how does it add to your understanding?you know the melody, sing or hum it. What do you · If someone created this today, what would benotice about how it sounds? di erent?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Have students write a brief description of the song or piece of sheet Think about what you already know about this period in history. sources, go to music in their own words. How do the lyrics support or contradict your current understanding http://www.loc.gov/teachers of this period? How does the song highlight the values or opinions Intermediate held during this period? How do you think the public reacted to this Select a song sheet or piece of sheet music. Speculate about the song? composer’s purpose in creating it, and what he or she expected it to accomplish. Do you think it achieved its writer’s goals? Explain why you think so. LOC.gov/teachers
  10. 10. TEACHER’S GUIDE O BSERVE Guide students with the sample questions as they respond to theAnalyzing Sound ION primary source. Encourage them to go back and forth between the REFLRecordings columns; there is no correct order. ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONHave students identify and note details. Encourage students to generate and Have students ask questions to lead to test hypotheses about the source. more observations and re ections.Sample Questions:Describe what you hear. · What do you notice What was the purpose of this recording? · Who do What do you wonder about... rst? · If you hear any voices, can you understand you think recorded it? · Was it the same person who who? · what? · when? · where? · why? · how?what is being sung or said? · Does it sound like was being recorded? · Who would be interested inan interview or a conversation? · Are there any hearing this? · What was happening at the time itbackground noises? · Does it sound like a studio was recorded? · What kind of equipment was usedrecording, or just “o the street”? · If the recording for the recording? · Do you like what you hear? If it isis musical do you know the song, or do you musical, could you dance to it? · What can you learnrecognize any intruments? · What other details can from listening to this recording?you hear?F U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O NHelp students to identify questions appropriate for further investigation, and to develop a research strategy for nding answers.Sample Question: What more do you want to know, and how can you nd out? A few follow-up Beginning Advanced For more tips on using primary activity ideas: Have students write a brief description of the recording in their own Think about what you already know about this period in history. sources, go to words. How does this recording support or contradict your current http://www.loc.gov/teachers understanding of this period? Intermediate Speculate about the purpose of the recording and what its creators expected the recording to accomplish. Do you think the recording achieved its creators’ goals? Explain why you think so. LOC.gov/teachers
  11. 11. BSERVE O ION REFLPrimary Source Analysis Tool ST E E C QU T OBSERVE REFLECT QUESTIONF U R T H E R I N V E S T I G AT I O N LOC.gov/teachers

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