Fables and Morals

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Fables and Morals

  1. 1. Fables and Morals
  2. 2. What are fables?Are they the same as fairytales? What’s their purpose?Are they found in every culture?
  3. 3. Some things you should y know about Fables…Early form of story tellingBelieved to be originated in IndiaAesop – Greek Slave, 620 B.C.
  4. 4. AESOP Credited for most of the knownfables heard today.His fables include “The Ant and theGrasshopper,” and “The Lion and theWolf.”
  5. 5. What are some characteristics of fables? Short stories Features animals, plants & forcesof nature with human qualities Handed down generation aftergeneration
  6. 6. Fables teach a lesson,can relate to everyone,and connects us withother cultures.
  7. 7. Which of these are characteristics of fables?A) Human GodsB) Animals with human characteristicsC) Happy endingsD) All of the above
  8. 8. So what are fairy tales?Start with “Once upon a time”Setting in a castle, forest or townStory has good/evil characters
  9. 9. Fairy Tales cont.Many characters are animals or royaltyStories have magicHas the numbers 3 or 7 in it
  10. 10. A Fairy Tale also….Story has a problemProblem in story is solvedGood wins over evil
  11. 11. Which one is not a characteristic of a fairytale?A) Has the numbers 3 and 7B) Once upon a timeC) Good wins over EvilD) Teaches a lesson
  12. 12. How are fables and fairy tales the same? Handed down from generation togenerationFictional stories – not true
  13. 13. Similarities: Fables &Fairy Tales• Connect us with different cultures• For all ages
  14. 14. Differences Fables Fairy TalesCharacters: Animals Characters: Royalty that act like humansTeaches a lesson Good vs. Evil
  15. 15. Fables of Different culturesInvolve animals found in that cultureReflects cultural beliefs
  16. 16. Fable: The Lion and the MouseA mouse was running up and down a lion’s faceThe lion woke up and was about to eat himThe mouse begged the lion to let him live
  17. 17. The Lion & the Mouse (cont.)• The mouse made a deal with Lion• If Lion let him go, the mouse would repay him one day, but the lion started to laugh at the mouse.• Soon after, Lion was trapped in a net.
  18. 18. Lion and Mouse (cont.)The mouse heard the lion’s roars. Runningto him, it nibbled through the net, freeingthe lion.Lion realized that mouse could help him. MORAL: Little friends may prove great friends
  19. 19. Fable: The Tortoise and the Hare• The hare laughed at the tortoise’s short feet and slow pace.• The tortoise challenged him to a race• The hare agreed
  20. 20. Tortoise and the Hare• The tortoise never stopped, he went slow and steady the whole way• The hare thought he had time and took a nap• He finally woke up, and rushed to the finish line
  21. 21. Tortoise and the Hare MORAL: Don’t rush into things
  22. 22. Fables can have more thanone lesson.Another lesson for thetortoise and the Hare is“Slow and Steady wins therace”
  23. 23. The Poor Ugly Hippo• African Fable• San people – Tribe in Africa• They thought the hippo was created last
  24. 24. The Poor Ugly HippoHippo was embarrassed because hethought he was fat & uglyHe begged the Creator to let him live inthe waterThe Creator said no – he would eat all thefish
  25. 25. The Poor Ugly HippoThe hippo promised to eat nothing inwaterBut the Creator said no, so the hippocontinued begging …Finally they made an agreement….
  26. 26. The Poor Ugly Hippo Hippos could live in water only if they came out every day to leave their dung The animals would search it for fish bones
  27. 27. This last moral wasreflective of the AfricancultureThey used an animalnative to their country
  28. 28. Animals Used in Fables Lion – Strength, Big Ego Donkey- stupid Fox – Sly• Hawk: tyrannical
  29. 29. Animals Used in FablesWolf – Greed, Dishonest Fly- wiseHen- conceitedLamb – Shyness
  30. 30. Using Fables and their Morals Literacy
  31. 31. The Frog and the OxA young frog, amazed at the huge size of an ox, rushed to tell her fatherabout the monster. The father frog, trying to impress his child, puffedhimself up to look like the ox. The young frog said it was much bigger.Again the father puffed himself up. The young frog insisted the monster waseven bigger. The father puffed and puffed - and burst!
  32. 32. Match the Moral to the FablePersuasion is better Beauty is in the eye Make hay while the than force. of the beholder. sun shines. . Small friends can be Don’t just follow the powerful allies. crowd. Liars may give Pride can be costly. Sometimes we do not themselves away. see our own strengths.
  33. 33. The Monkey and the DolphinA monkey fell from a ship and was rescued by a dolphin. The dolphinasked if he lived nearby. The monkey lied and said that he did. “Do youknow Seriphos?” asked the dolphin. The monkey, thinking Seriphos was aperson’s name, boasted that it was his best friend. As Seriphos was a town,the dolphin knew the monkey was lying, so he dived, leaving him to swim toshore.
  34. 34. Match the Moral to the FablePersuasion is better Beauty is in the eye Make hay while the than force. of the beholder. sun shines. . Don’t just follow the Small friends can be crowd. powerful allies. Pride can be costly. Liars may give Sometimes we do themselves away. not see our own strengths.
  35. 35. The Fox and the Old LionAn old lion sent out word that he was ill and said that he would like theanimals and birds to visit him. Most went but fox did not. Finally thelion sent for him, asking why he had not come to see him. The clever foxreplied, “I had planned to, but I noticed that although many tracks led intoyour cave, none led out.”
  36. 36. Match the Moral to the FablePersuasion is better Beauty is in the eye Make hay while the than force. of the beholder. sun shines. . Don’t just follow the Small friends can be crowd. powerful allies. Pride can be costly. Liars may give Sometimes we do themselves away. not see our own strengths.

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