Enabling successful education-to-work transitions for emerging creatives: A Web 2.0 creative ecology<br />Dr Jen Pei-Ling ...
synopsis<br /><ul><li>Digital content industries (DCI)
Education-to-work transition challenges for emerging creatives
60sox: an innovative Web 2.0 creative ecology
facilitate industry exposure, social networks, transdisciplinary engagement
enable successful education-to-work transitions</li></li></ul><li>digital content industries (DCI)<br /><ul><li>sectors th...
examples:
online/digital film, TV, broadcasting
online/digital graphic design, media and visual effects (software, music, games, services)
online/digital artefacts (museums, galleries, libraries)
online/digital education content</li></ul>(DCITA, 2006; DCMS, 2001)<br />
digital content industries (DCI)<br />growing significantly faster than other economic sectors<br /><ul><li>EU: 1999-2003,...
UK: 1997-2005,6% overall growth of the creative industries’ GVA, ₤14.6 billion exports, 7.3% GDP, 2M jobs
USA: 2001, copyright industries worth US$791.2 billion, 7.75% GDP, 8M jobs</li></li></ul><li>CI/DCI: Australia<br />1996 –...
CI/DCI: Australia<br />1996 – 2006,jobs rose by 34% to ~500,000  jobs<br />Source: Unpublished ABS data provided by the AR...
digital content industries (DCI)<br /><ul><li>Similar trend/focus in emerging economies (e.g. China, Singapore, etc.):
key engine of (future) economic growth
key competitive advantage in globalised economy
For example, Singapore’s Ministry of Information, Communication & The Arts (MICA):
Creative Industries Development Strategy (2003)
Renaissance City 2.0, DesignSingapore, Media 21</li></li></ul><li>creative human capital in DCI<br />on the other…<br />on...
increased student intake
studying creative skills
creatively/technically literate
skills shortage
difficulty finding jobs
not industry ready
commercially illiterate</li></ul>successful education-to-work transitions a key challenge<br />
education-to-work challenges for creatives<br />Source: Karmel, Mlotkowski and Awodeyi (2008) <br />
education-to-work challenges for creatives<br />Source: Haukka et al. (2009) <br />
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Education-to-work transitions in the digital content industries: A Web 2.0 creative ecology

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The digital content industries in many countries have seen significant growth over the past decade. This knowledge-intensive sector relies on highly skilled human capital but is often challenged by skills and labour shortages, in turn exacerbated by a lack of high quality industry-ready graduates. This presentation first foregrounds some of the key challenges associated with education-to-work transitions encountered by emerging creative graduates in the digital content industries. It then proceeds to document the design and implementation of an innovative Web 2.0 creative ecology known as ‘60sox’. The potential and challenges of the '60sox' virtual community of practice for enhancing social capital and enabling successful education-to-work transitions among emerging creatives in the digital content industries are highlighted and discussed.

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  • They are estimated to be worth $21 billion or almost 3.5% of Australia’s GDP and employ 300,000 people. They are driversof the knowledge economy and enablers for other industry sectors. They translate ‘directly into the competitive advantage and innovation capability of other sectors of the economy’ (QUT CIRAC and Cutler&Co, 2004). Software + digital content + design/visual arts/architecture = accounts for largest share of growth
  • Similar trend – software & digital content + architecture, design and visual arts sectors accountfor the largest proportion of jobs.
  • Lucas films, polytechnics, ITE, university == responding to these labour demands, we see an increasing number of programs, courses, units that provide education and training in the creative industries.
  • Table: Employment using creative talents by State and territory (excluding NT and Tasmania)Security of employmentOut of the 166 respondents who were graduates, 105 respondents were currently working and 67 of these respondents indicated their employment type. Respondents employed to use their creative talents were more likely to work full-time, casually, or through freelance/project work (Figure 6). Respondents not currently employed to use their creative talents were significantly more likely to work casually. These findings confirm that many CI graduates lack job security.
  • Table: Difficulty/ease in finding work in chosen creative fieldBarriers to successful transitionsResponses = 31261.5% RR1 Very hard = 96 (18.9%)2 Difficult = 143 (28.2%)3 Undecided = 50 (9.9%)4 Easy = 18 (3.6%)5 Very easy = 5 (1%)Almost half of all respondents indicated that finding work was either ‘very hard’ or ‘difficult’ (Table 12). The project team performed a number of cross tabs to determine whether there were any differences between the views of CI graduates and CI students about the difficulty/ease in finding work, and between the views of respondents employed to use their creative talents and those not employed to use their creative talents. This analysis found no significant differences in the views of these different groups in finding work.
  • Table: Difficulty/ease in finding work in chosen creative fieldBarriers to successful transitionsResponses = 31261.5% RR1 Very hard = 96 (18.9%)2 Difficult = 143 (28.2%)3 Undecided = 50 (9.9%)4 Easy = 18 (3.6%)5 Very easy = 5 (1%)Almost half of all respondents indicated that finding work was either ‘very hard’ or ‘difficult’ (Table 12). The project team performed a number of cross tabs to determine whether there were any differences between the views of CI graduates and CI students about the difficulty/ease in finding work, and between the views of respondents employed to use their creative talents and those not employed to use their creative talents. This analysis found no significant differences in the views of these different groups in finding work.
  • People can set-up WatchLists of other creators they reckon are cool, they can nominate Favourites so can easily refer to items on the site they find inspirational, they can communicate to each other and use other people’s work as the basis of new creative content. We have written-in Creative Commons licensing so people can choose how they want their work used. Industry can upload available positions such as paid work, apprenticeships and interested folk can apply with the click of a button.
  • Green = soxtersOrange = 2 bobmobPurple = industrybodYellow = admin
  • Education-to-work transitions in the digital content industries: A Web 2.0 creative ecology

    1. 1. Enabling successful education-to-work transitions for emerging creatives: A Web 2.0 creative ecology<br />Dr Jen Pei-Ling Tan, Dr Sandra Haukka<br />Queensland University of Technology<br />jen.tan@qut.edu.au<br />Other researchers:<br />Justin Brow, Prof Greg Hearn, <br />Prof Stuart Cunningham<br />
    2. 2. synopsis<br /><ul><li>Digital content industries (DCI)
    3. 3. Education-to-work transition challenges for emerging creatives
    4. 4. 60sox: an innovative Web 2.0 creative ecology
    5. 5. facilitate industry exposure, social networks, transdisciplinary engagement
    6. 6. enable successful education-to-work transitions</li></li></ul><li>digital content industries (DCI)<br /><ul><li>sectors that use digital technologies to create, manage and disseminate their products and services
    7. 7. examples:
    8. 8. online/digital film, TV, broadcasting
    9. 9. online/digital graphic design, media and visual effects (software, music, games, services)
    10. 10. online/digital artefacts (museums, galleries, libraries)
    11. 11. online/digital education content</li></ul>(DCITA, 2006; DCMS, 2001)<br />
    12. 12. digital content industries (DCI)<br />growing significantly faster than other economic sectors<br /><ul><li>EU: 1999-2003,19.7% overall growth of creative industries’ (CI) GVA, €654 billion turnover, 2.6% GDP, 3.1% employment, 5.8M jobs
    13. 13. UK: 1997-2005,6% overall growth of the creative industries’ GVA, ₤14.6 billion exports, 7.3% GDP, 2M jobs
    14. 14. USA: 2001, copyright industries worth US$791.2 billion, 7.75% GDP, 8M jobs</li></li></ul><li>CI/DCI: Australia<br />1996 – 2006,earnings rose by 113.6% to A$27 billion<br />Source: Unpublished ABS data provided by the ARC Centre for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI) <br />
    15. 15. CI/DCI: Australia<br />1996 – 2006,jobs rose by 34% to ~500,000 jobs<br />Source: Unpublished ABS data provided by the ARC Centre for Creative Industries and Innovation (CCI) <br />
    16. 16. digital content industries (DCI)<br /><ul><li>Similar trend/focus in emerging economies (e.g. China, Singapore, etc.):
    17. 17. key engine of (future) economic growth
    18. 18. key competitive advantage in globalised economy
    19. 19. For example, Singapore’s Ministry of Information, Communication & The Arts (MICA):
    20. 20. Creative Industries Development Strategy (2003)
    21. 21. Renaissance City 2.0, DesignSingapore, Media 21</li></li></ul><li>creative human capital in DCI<br />on the other…<br />on one hand…<br /><ul><li>buoyant industry
    22. 22. increased student intake
    23. 23. studying creative skills
    24. 24. creatively/technically literate
    25. 25. skills shortage
    26. 26. difficulty finding jobs
    27. 27. not industry ready
    28. 28. commercially illiterate</li></ul>successful education-to-work transitions a key challenge<br />
    29. 29. education-to-work challenges for creatives<br />Source: Karmel, Mlotkowski and Awodeyi (2008) <br />
    30. 30. education-to-work challenges for creatives<br />Source: Haukka et al. (2009) <br />
    31. 31. education-to-work challenges for creatives<br />Source: Haukka et al. (2009) <br />
    32. 32. barriers to successful ed-to-work transitions<br />Qs: Difficulty/ease in finding work in chosen creative field?<br />Source: Haukka et al. (2009) <br />
    33. 33. barriers to successful ed-to-work transitions<br /> “Connections, not knowing the right people.”<br />“Experience—all jobs these days are looking for current experience in the area, or so they seem to be.”<br />“It&apos;s hard to get a job without much experience, and it&apos;s hard to get experience because no one will give you a job.” <br />“I&apos;ve had a lot of work experience and great references, but it’s a hard industry and there is a lot of competition.”<br />Source: Haukka et al. (2009) <br />
    34. 34. successful education-to-work transitions: some strategies<br />time in industry to acquire industry-specific skills and experience, work habits and culture<br />access to mentors with expertise and industry experience<br />access to up-to-date resources (facilities, materials, equipment)<br />institutions that provide information on skill needs, develop partnerships with industry bodies, facilitate dialogue between creatives/teachers/employers<br />(Jung et al. 2004)<br />
    35. 35. successful education-to-work transitions: some strategies<br />industry exposure<br />trans-disciplinary skills (specific + generic)<br />social networks<br />how can we make this happen in practice?<br />
    36. 36.
    37. 37.
    38. 38.
    39. 39.
    40. 40. cool bits<br />watchlists<br />favourites<br />communication between members<br />Creative Commons & Copyright<br />work opportunities<br />GuruVu & trajectory <br />
    41. 41. constructive feedback: peers<br />
    42. 42. 2bobmob<br />interactive media<br />film & video<br />design<br />animation<br />photography<br />visual art<br />music & audio<br />writing<br />
    43. 43. 2bobmob (some of ‘em)<br />Karyn Lanthois Kukan Studio <br />Jason Stark Krome Studios <br />Kid Kenobi Legend DJ<br />Gotye Musician Extraordinaire<br />Garry Emery emerystudio <br />Erik Williamson Photographer<br />Simon Cahill Sony/BMG Red Label<br />Woody Sneaker Freaker Magazine <br />Steve Danzig International Digital Art Projects (iDAP)<br />Robert Murray Firemint <br />Andrew Apostola Portable Film Festival <br />John Birmingham Author / Journo<br />Eddie White The People&apos;s Republic of Animation <br />Tim Parrington MRPPP <br />Miles Merrill Performance Poet<br />
    44. 44. 60sox social network analysis: what goes on?<br />
    45. 45. 60sox: enabling education-to-work transitions<br />social networks<br />industry exposure<br />trans-disciplinary engagement & skills<br />
    46. 46. 60sox key facts:<br />all about bringing together industry and hot new creatives<br /><ul><li>highest usage levels
    47. 47. 437 Soxters (May 2008), 68 2bobmob (July 2008)
    48. 48. enhance social networks, industry exposure, trans-disciplinary engagement
    49. 49. enabled (some) successful education-to-work transitions
    50. 50. real world events:
    51. 51. portfolio workshops, exhibitions, screenings, awards nights, 60brief, distribution channels </li></li></ul><li>60sox challenges:<br />from novelty to sustainability?<br />from community of practice to community of innovation?<br />transferable to othereducation-to-work transition contexts?<br />
    52. 52. Questions, comments, feedback…<br />
    53. 53. Enabling successful education-to-work transitions for emerging creatives: A Web 2.0 creative ecology<br />Dr Jen Pei-Ling Tan, Dr Sandra Haukka<br />Queensland University of Technology<br />jen.tan@qut.edu.au<br />Other researchers:<br />Justin Brow, Prof Greg Hearn, <br />Prof Stuart Cunningham<br />

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