Hk shue yan univ

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The Strategic Thinking Protocal - how to transform your organization

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  • How doe we alter attiudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors How do we create horizontal as well as vertical sync The University will transform when the work behaviors of the faculty and staff change in alignment with the statement of intent. People can and will adapt when they own the results of the process
  • Good morning, My purpose today is not to talk about Strategic Leadership the concept. My purpose is to talk about how we can use the tools of strategic leaders to train and develop our leaders to be prepared for today and tomorrow. I start with “WHY”
  • Creative thinking is defined in the dictionary of the American Psychological Association (Vanderbos, 2006) as mental processes leading to a new invention, solution, or synthesis in any area Creative ideas are both novel and valuable - original and useful ideas (Amabile, 1996; West, 2002).   innovation refers to the use of a new idea or method, whereas invention refers more directly to the creation of the idea or method itself. Innovation refers to the successful implementation of creative ideas or a capacity to improve existing products and/or processes which produce value to the organization is more than just having a creative idea. It requires selling the idea inside and outside the organization. By reorganizing available knowledge, facts, and information Strategic thinking is about thinking centered on ends, strategies, and tactics. It is only meaningful in a context. The greater the capacity to use strategic thinking skills; the greater the ability to make consequential decisions about ends, strategies, and tactics. Great strategic thinkers have a systems perspective, are intent driven, creative, intuitive, integrative, and analytical
  • Mindset is the way you think about things. The schemas – , i.e. cognitive filters, mental models, and assumptions held by individuals or groups which creates an outlook that causes them to act in a certain way. People only see what they are prepared to see. —Ralph Waldo Emerson The future is catching all of us. At least we can make sure that it catches us with our eyes and our minds wind open. Kegan & Lahey Competitive commitments (unconscious clinging to competing agendas) create immunity to change. They are not weaknesses = they are self protection. Rooted in assumptions of self and world around us. Competing assumptions try to keep our world in tact. Sisyphean (endlessly futile – can’t be completed) tasks – rolling a bolder up the hill only to see it roll back down (c) Thinking Futures 2007
  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9X2hZe_NNcY&feature=related
  • emergent and self-organizing behavior. What, then, is the role of leadership in systems where change often emerges in unexpected ways? In this paper, we build on the work of Marion and Uhl-Bien who suggest that in complex systems leaders enable rather than control the future. While traditional views of leadership focus leader responsibility for determining and directing the future through control mechanisms As enablers leaders disrupt existing patterns and make sense of emerging events for others Conant and Ashby’s (1970) principle of requisite variety, change agents are more likely to be successful when their mental models of change match the complexity of the change processes unfolding in their organization. Exploration includes things captured by terms such as search, variation, risk taking, experimentation, play, flexibility, discovery, innovation. Exploitation includes such things as refinement, choice, production, efficiency, selection, implementation, execution. Adaptive systems that engage in exploration to the exclusion of exploitation are likely March and Simon (1958), dissatisfaction with existing conditions stimulates people to search for improved conditions, and people stop searching when a satisfactory result is found. Sustained organizational performance is rooted in exploiting existing competences and exploring new opportunities (He & Wong, 2004; Gibson & Birkinshaw, 2004 Life trajectory important inflection points caused bv fundamental industry dynamics technologies strategies Learn from past, adapt to the present, and envision and create the future Learning and change are based upon either exploitation of core competencies or exploraExploitation without exploration can lead to specialization and excess, to confidence and contentment, to dogma and ritual, to death. The ability of a firm to avoid the seduction of success and change, while maintaining performance, is a function of both its capacity to change and its ability to learn (Black & Boal, 1996; Boal & Hooijberg, 2000).tion for new opportunities (March, 1991).
  • Ford Motor Company from 10,000 cars manufactured in 1908 to 472,350 cars in 1915 to 933,720 cars in 1920.
  • Context Driven Hambrick (1989) argues that strategic leadership occurs in an environment embedded in ambiguity, complexity, and informational overload. The ability to execute the statement of intent in such environments is dependent on realized performance improvements, resource availability, and the readiness of the organization to change. Returning to the concept of strategic inflection points (Burgelman & Grove, 1996), we suggest that SIPs create a kairotic moment in which the organization and its members are particularly receptive to charismatic, transformational, and visionary processes. It is during these kairotic moments that learning and change are possible if only the leader possesses the discernment to take notice and the wisdom to act. What is needed now is a better understanding of which leaders can take advantage of these SIPs as well as research that explores how these factors inuence the charismatic and transformational relationship Lord and Hall (1992) suggest that leadership effectiveness may hinge more on social intelli­gence and behavioral flexibility than other factors cognitive and behavioral complexity and social intelligence form the foundation for absorptive capacity, capacity to change, and managerial wisdom.   What is the role of leadership in systems where change often emerges in unexpected ways? In complex systems leaders enable rather than control the future. While traditional views of leadership focus leader responsibility for determining and directing the future through control mechanisms As enablers leaders disrupt existing patterns and make sense of emerging events for others Conant and Ashby’s (1970) principle of requisite variety, change agents are more likely to be successful when their mental models of change match the complexity of the change processes unfolding in their organization. Exploration includes things captured by terms such as search, variation, risk taking, experimentation, play, flexibility, discovery, innovation. Exploitation includes such things as refinement, choice, production, efficiency, selection, implementation, execution. Adaptive systems that engage in exploration to the exclusion of exploitation are likely March and Simon (1958), dissatisfaction with existing conditions stimulates people to search for improved conditions, and people stop searching when a satisfactory result is found. Sustained organizational performance is rooted in exploiting existing competences and exploring new opportunities (He & Wong, 2004; Gibson & Birkinshaw, 2004 Life trajectory important inflection points caused bv fundamental industry dynamics technologies strategies Learn from past, adapt to the present, and envision and create the future Learning and change are based upon either exploitation of core competencies or exploration for new opportunities (March, 1991). Exploitation without exploration can lead to specialization and excess, to confidence and contentment, to dogma and ritual, to death. The ability of a firm to avoid the seduction of success and change, while maintaining performance, is a function of both its capacity to change and its ability to learn (Black & Boal, 1996; Boal & Hooijberg, 2000).tion
  • Mindset “drives every aspect of our lives, from work to sports, from relationships to parenting.” (Dweck, 2006). It affects : What we pay attention to (and don’t) What we retrieve from memory The way you process relevant information Decision Making Self-efficacy Openness to learning Responses to authority/leader figures Leadership is always situated within an environmental context and leaders must be trained to understand and address strategic themes emanating from that context. It requires mental agility. We are asking more workers to shift to self authoring minds and more leaders to move to transforming minds. The self authoring mind would create a direction – align and have the courage to hold steadfast toward that view. The transforming mind would be able to do all of that but would be able to step outside – evaluate and re-author Mental complexity can make a complex world more or less manageable (Keagan & Kelley, p. 24 Cognitive development is progressive and sequential
  • The 5 Whys is a questions-asking method used to explore the cause/effect relationships underlying a particular problem, with the goal of determining a root cause of a defect or problem The following example demonstrates the basic process: The vehicle will not start. (the problem) Why? - The battery is dead. (first why) “ The one who would be in constant happiness must frequently change." --Confucius Why? - The alternator is not functioning. (second why) Why? - The alternator belt has broken. (third why) Why? - The alternator belt was well beyond its useful service life and not replaced. (fourth why) Why? - The vehicle was not maintained according to the recommended service schedule. (fifth why, a root cause) Why? - Replacement parts are not available because of the extreme age of the vehicle. (sixth why, optional footnote) Start maintaining the vehicle according to the recommended service schedule. (possible 5th Why solution) Purchase a different vehicle that is maintainable. (possible 6th Why solution) The questioning for this example could be taken further to a sixth, seventh, or higher level: the "five" in 5 Whys is not gospel, but five iterations of asking why is generally sufficient to get to a root cause. The key is to encourage the trouble-shooter to avoid assumptions and logic traps and instead trace the chain of causality in direct increments from the effect through any layers of abstraction to a root cause that still has some connection to the original problem. Note that in this example the fifth why suggests a broken process or an alterable behaviour, which is typical of reaching the root-cause level. It is interesting to note that the last answer points to a process. This is one of the most important aspects in the 5 Why approach - the real root cause should point toward a process that is not working well or does not exist. Untrained facilitators will often observe that answers seem to point towards classical answers such as not enough time, not enough investments, or not enough manpower. These answers may sometimes be true but in most cases they lead to answers out of our control. Therefore, instead of asking the question why? , ask why did the process fail? A key phrase to keep in mind in any 5 Why exercise is "people do not fail, processes do". The technique was originally developed by Sakichi Toyoda and was used within the Toyota Motor Corporation during the evolution of its manufacturing methodologies. It is a critical component of problem-solving training, delivered as part of the induction into the Toyota Production System . The architect of the Toyota Production System, Taiichi Ohno , described the 5 Whys method as "the basis of Toyota's scientific approach . . . by repeating why five times, the nature of the problem as well as its solution becomes clear." [1] The tool has seen widespread use beyond Toyota, and is now used within Kaizen , lean manufacturing , and Six Sigma . While the 5 Whys is a powerful tool for engineers or technically-savvy individuals to help get to the true causes of problems, it has been criticized by Teruyuki Minoura, former managing director of global purchasing for Toyota, as being too basic a tool to analyze root causes to the depth that is needed to ensure that they are fixed. [4] Reasons for this criticism include: Tendency for investigators to stop at symptoms rather than going on to lower-level root causes. Inability to go beyond the investigator's current knowledge - cannot find causes that they do not already know. Lack of support to help the investigator ask the right "why" questions. Results are not repeatable - different people using 5 Whys come up with different causes for the same problem. Tendency to isolate a single root cause, whereas each question could elicit many different root causes. These can be significant problems when the method is applied through deduction only. On-the-spot verification of the answer to the current "why" question before proceeding to the next is recommended to avoid these issues. the victory gained from each battle comes about because strategies and tactics are never repeated. Rather, they should vary according to the circumstances, with infinite possibilities. The principle underlying military deployment may be likened to water. It is the inherent characteristic of flowing water to flow from high places and hasten its movement low places. In the same way, the disposition and deployment of an army should be to avoid strengths and attack weaknesses. Just as water controls its flow according to the characteristics of the terrain, and army should try to create its victory according to the situations of the enemy. So, in conduct of war, there are no fixed situations and condition, just like water has no constant shape and configuration. The persons who gains victories by adapting to the changing conditions and situations of the enemy can be considered a legend in warfare.
  • Agility is the capability to switch from a strategic mindset -“Why and What” - to a tactical mindset -“How and When” - in a rapid and iterative processes. Agility enables leaders to understand the prevailing worldviews driving their context, and helps them identify and use design tactics that work under postmodern condition
  • Flexibility is an essential feature of leaders who think strategically. Flexibility is not about changing the goals, it is about abandoning fixed ideas, it is about thinking of array of possible solutions, never thought of before and all the while retaining constancy of purpose What makes something strategic? Think #strategic thinking, strategic conversations, strategic listening, working in a strategic way, or the statement of strategic intent!!! Here is what it means! # Learning is a characteristic feature of leaders who are strategic thinkers. They not only learn from their own experience, they also have the ability to draw analogy from others experience. Strategy defined Strategic thinking is a cognitive activity but is meaningful only in a context Reframers – scanners - Leaders are people who, singularly or with others, establish direction and then mobilize people, capture resources, and create an adaptive learning culture to move toward it. The basic elements of strategic leadership have not changed much – what is needed is - According to recent research, the essence of strategic leadership lies in the ability to learn (absorptive capacity), the ability to change (adaptive capacity), and managerial wisdom (Boal & Hooijberg, 2000) or the right combination of intelligence, creativity and wisdom (Sternberg, 2003). These elements are often highlighted in organizational transformations when the managers, trying to create meaning and purpose for the organizations, may need to revitalize or even significantly change the business model on which the whole organizational effort is based, to take advantage of emerging strategic opportunities and threats, and to monitor and balance the needs of different stakeholders (Storey, 2005). The absorptive capacity enables leaders to actively searched for information and new ideas outside the direct environments of the organizations through discussions with the managers of other firms and by meeting existing and potential customers. the adaptive capacity may closely relate to a person‘s ability to learn, since learning Thus, the basis for successful absorption and adaptation is largely in openness to new things. Managerial wisdom include the ability to understand social actors and their relationships (also known as social intelligence), the ability to perceive variation in the environment, and the ability to take the right action at the right time. Serlachius‘s ability to construct and maintain social and professional networks is one .
  • joan@jfwilliams.com - george@georgeneedham.com
  • To do so, leaders, singularly or with others, think and work in a strategic way to discover the future AND make it happen!!! If direction exists you work on strategic execution – if direction is not given you work on strategic thinking first then execution
  • SLers know that close scrutiny helps in the beginning, but constrains in the long term.
  • The most successful people are the ones you have to go through – find the key
  • Story??? David Barram or FBI? BUY THE BOOK!
  • seek and foster collective wisdom S trategic Leaders:   Sense change in the environment, Gather and interpret relevant information about the change, Suggest significant changes which the organization must address, Call on parts of the organization to act upon the suggestions, Introduce new processes and services which are more in line with the perceived changes in the environment, and   Monitor internal changes and the impact of those changes.
  • SLers know that in every organization there is a WE-THEY LINE - the line where people above it say WE DID IT and people below it say THEY DID IT . SLers create a shared reality and then a shared direction to get more people above the WE-THEY LINE where vision and aspirations are
  • How do we overcome this problem?
  • The aim of strategic leadership is to determine the ends, choose the best ways, and apply the most effective means. The strategy is the plan whose aim is to link ends, ways, and means. Strategic leadership is the thinking and decision making required to develop and effect the plan devising of plans that are feasible, desirable, and acceptable to one’s organization and partners. The new leadership maps are grounded in a holistic learning process described as the Leader’s Wheel .  The rim of the wheel is composed of four learning habits: anticipating the future; articulating direction; aligning human resources; assuring performance.  At the center of the wheel are leaders who possess the wisdom and ability to make consequential decisions about ends (Z) and the actions and tactics to move the organization and/or teams from A to Z.  These strategic leaders depend heavily on two core competencies - artistry of actions and agility of the mind - to run two protocols: strategic thinking and strategic execution. The leader joins agility with anticipating and articulating to form the strategic thinking protocol that results in a statement of strategic intent. Artistry is joined with aligning and assuring to form the strategic execution protocol that results in self managed teams and high performance. The takeaway is that strategic leaders use two protocols to drive learning and performance: strategic thinking and strategic execution.
  • The one I recommend you use with your team – organization – school etc The Navigating Team is the processing Unit Organizations are products of the ways their participants think, feel, value, and interact To evolve an organization, people must have opportunities to change their attributes Charismatic leaders, increased training, and top-down commands are all ineffective A cultural process of experimentation and reflection is the best method for continuous evolution -- individual and collective Navigating Team is the processing Unit Key Features Foster Collective Wisdom & Shared Context. Guided by a Team of Opinion Leaders. Essence is developing understanding by all members Transparency - All members get the same information. Strategic Listening Strategic Conversations Product is Statement of Strategic Intent Quality Team Design/Action Teams
  • organizational learning was enabled through a process of convergence, emergence and co-creation. Committee and community work plans
  • The strategic thinking protocol is developed through the follows five steps. A key understanding is that all members receive the same information as the committee. The purpose here is to be transparent so all members understand the problems faced and can participate in crafting the direction that will be taken. The information is processed in the following way. Step 1 – Quantitative and qualitative data are gathered from the internal and external environment. The quantitative data comes from the official University Database upon which decisions are being made. The qualitative data is gathered through interviews of individuals outside the College, summaries are written. [The following skill is needed - ability to use analytical techniques to evaluate and synthesize data from multiple sources]. Summaries of the interviews and quantitative data are developed and shared with all members. Step 2 – A series of 5 strategic conversations – following a listen – dialogue – learn sequence will be held with all members participating. Step 3 – At the end of each conversation, the committee makes strategic choices as to where the investment of time and money will return the best payoff on a college wide basis then presents draft statements for full member review – until consensus on each item – mission – aspiration – core values – priorities has been achieved. [Aspiration should be compelling – and able to be measured]   Step 4 – When the Statement of Strategic Intent is adopted by the College and becomes policy, it needs to be implemented so that it is a living document that guides the College toward its aspiration. At this time, the committee is disbanded and the protocol enters into the strategic planning phase – implementing teams are structured around each priority – it is this team’s responsibility to flesh out the priority and create a concrete response, and then execute it. The planning phase is guided by a quality committee [composed of different members than the strategic thinking committee]. The quality committee is charged with developing a report card to continuously review the implementation of the approved Statement of Intent. The quality committee uses this report card as a management tool to ensure that the Intent is implemented in a timely fashion.   Step 5 - The planning phase is guided by a quality committee [composed of different members than the strategic thinking committee]. The quality committee is charged with developing a report card to continuously review the implementation of the approved Statement of Intent. The quality committee uses this report card as a management tool to ensure that the Intent is implemented in a timely fashion.
  • 25 min interview with 15 minutes for Q/A Not speeches – ask them two questions What are the threats in our environment that we should be concerned with? What are the opportunities found in our environment that we can take advantage of? Create a summary of the conversation and send to your staff and ask for additions or subtractions Create the Summary table as seen on the slide
  • Strategic Leaders:   Sense change in the environment, Gather and interpret relevant information about the change, Suggest significant changes which the organization must address, Call on parts of the organization to act upon the suggestions, Introduce new processes and services which are more in line with the perceived changes in the environment, and   Monitor internal changes and the impact of those changes.
  • In the new economy conversations are the most important form of work. Alan Webber (1993) Harvard Business Review Strategic leaders replace bureaucratic controls by using a new set of tools they: Make the target concrete and clear. Track performance. Teach the organization’s point of view. Make learning a priority. Empower Recruit and select for performance and culture fit Tie rewards to results, individual growth, and contribution The essence of this type of activity is understanding . Leading to: acquiring shared experiences developing shared language surfacing background information The essence of this type of activity is understanding . Leading to: acquiring shared experiences developing shared language surfacing background information They do not have to agree with someone else’s perspective, but they do have to understand it. Create a shared context by: acquiring shared experiences developing shared language surfacing background information making efforts to put oneself in the other person’s shoes The purpose is to enable people to think from each other’s point of view. The essence of this type of activity is understanding .
  • Strategic Leaders: Sense change in the environment, Gather and interpret relevant information about the change, Suggest significant changes which the organization must address, Call on parts of the organization to act upon the suggestions, Introduce new processes and services which are more in line with the perceived changes in the environment, and   Monitor internal changes and the impact of those changes.
  • Focus on drawing a canvas not a document to unlock creativity of people through out org Build around the strategy canvas rather than numbers Develop strategy that breaks away form competition Can’t discuss changes before resolving differences of opinion
  • The Strategy Canvas is a critical diagnostic and action tool utilized in the Blue Ocean Strategy process. It allows an organization to visualize the competitive factors and the current state of play of those factors within an industry and then compares the organization’s offering with those of the industry in general. When combined with other tools, the strategy canvas helps you create your new blue ocean strategy. We have already discussed Value Innovation as being key to Blue Ocean Strategy (see April 1, 2009 blog post). The strategy canvas helps you to create value innovation. As you read this, refer to the strategy canvas example below of the electronic games industry. The strategy canvas has three components. First are the competitive factors. Competitive factors are the six to twelve features or benefits considered key or essential to the promotion of a product or service to its intended market. It is a value element used to attract buyers. These are listed across bottom horizontal axis of the canvas. The second component is the Offering level up the vertical axis. The level of a competitive factor that the buyer receives and a company invests. I.e. at what level do you provide education? A high score means a company offers buyers more, and therefore invests more in that factor. In the case of price, a higher score means a higher price. Understand that since you are going to be listing only your top 6 – 12 factors, the level of the offering is going to be high for each factor and each competitor in the industry. The third component is the Value Curve created when you plot the competitive factor against the offering level and connect the dots. This key component of the strategy canvas is created when the offering level of an industry’s or organization’s competitive factors are plotted on the strategy canvas and the dots connected. Forces your attention: out to the external environment to understand the impact of change, on connections and interdependencies, on aligning internal capacity with reality of a constantly changing external environment, on identifying strategy that will ensure viability of your organisations into the future, and on the big picture. How do we connect out there? What does it mean for our operations? Scan actively Scan in strange places Scan for diversity of perspectives (not right, not wrong, just is) Look for connections, collisions and intersections. RSS feeds Strategic vision is built on an outside-in perspective – driven byt the demand side – or an inside out perspective that is operationally driven The strategy canvas is both a diagnostic and an action framework – it helps companies see the future in the present Horizontal axis captures the range of factors that are key to the promotion of wine - the industry competes on and invests in. The vertical captures the offering level that buyers receive across all three key competing factors. A high score means that a company is offering buyers more, and hence invests more in that factor. Price = high score indicates a higher price/ Plot all companies this way to find value curve and strategic profile which depicts companies relative performance across the industry’s factors of competition. When value curve lacks focus Differentiation Strategy – price requires high differentiation across factors Does market share reflect high scores on factors To value innovate which factors to eliminate Cost leadership Strategy – low differentiation across factors Conventional strategic logic is to benchmark competitors and out perform by more for less To shift canvas – reorient focus from competitors to alternatives and from customers to non customers of indiustry to pursue value and cost
  • Whereas strategic planning is about putting things together, implementation, monitoring and reporting. It requires a different mindset.
  • Aspirations are differentiated from vision when they are compelling enough that people can feel them in their heart. A Mission statement tells you the fundamental purpose of the organization. It concentrates on the present. It defines the customer and the critical processes. It informs you of the desired level of performance. A Vision statement outlines what the organization wants to be. It concentrates on the future. It is a source of inspiration. It provides clear decision-making criteria Mission, Aspiration and Principles are fixed – Drive Stability Priorities/Initiatives are flexible. - Drive Growth A Mission statement tells you the fundamental purpose of the organization. It concentrates on the present. It defines the customer and the critical processes. It informs you of the desired level of performance. A Vision statement outlines what the organization wants to be. It concentrates on the future. It is a source of inspiration. It provides clear decision-making criteria. A Mission statement tells you the fundamental purpose of the organization. It concentrates on the present. It defines the customer and the critical processes. It informs you of the desired level of performance. A Vision statement outlines what the organization wants to be. It concentrates on the future. It is a source of inspiration. It provides clear decision-making criteria.
  • Strategic Leaders:   Sense change in the environment, Gather and interpret relevant information about the change, Suggest significant changes which the organization must address, Call on parts of the organization to act upon the suggestions, Introduce new processes and services which are more in line with the perceived changes in the environment, and   Monitor internal changes and the impact of those changes.
  • Hk shue yan univ

    1. 1. S t r a t e g ic T h in k in g Finding the Future and Transforming the Academy John Pisapia, ProfessorHong Kong Shue Yan University Florida Atlantic University jpisapia@fau.eduWorkshop – 2012
    2. 2. Overview Target #1: How to use of the Strategic ThinkingProtocol to encourage universities to transition frominward looking silos to outward looking departments and colleges. • Theme 1: The Nature of Change Power of the Curve • Theme 2: Self Cultivation: A Way of Thinking, A Way of Acting, and a PhilosophyTheme 3: Organizational Cultivation: The SL METHODA Way of Working to Find the Future and Make it Happen! 05/07/12 2
    3. 3. S trategic ThinkingNew World – New Tactics Why? What? How?
    4. 4. The Mind we need! Unfortunately, “We cant solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.” Creative ideas are both novel and valuable “Think Differently” The innovative mind takes the creative idea and successfully implements it 4
    5. 5. Awareness TestWhat is Stopping Us from Developing the Mindset we need? The Strategic Leader Network 5
    6. 6. Why?“The most successful leaders see a picture not yet actualized. They see things that belong in the present picture but are not there yet. They make co-workers see that it is not their purpose which is to be achieved but a common purpose born of the activities of the group.” Mary Parker Follett 6
    7. 7. WHY ?Every few hundred years in western historythere occurs a sharp transformation. Wecross... a divide. Within a few short decadessociety rearranges itself, its world view; itsbasic values; its social and political structure;its arts; its key institutions. Fifty years later,there appears a new world...we are currentlyliving through such a transformation.Drucker, 1993: p 1 You don’t have to change
    8. 8. Why do we need to think and Lead Differently?The Power of the Curve ion rat plo Ex ion tat loi p Ex 05/07/12 The Strategic Leader Network 8
    9. 9. WHAT KIND OF CHANGE ISTHIS? 1927 1917 1907 05/07/12 The Strategic Leader Network 9
    10. 10. Why do we need to Lead Differently?The Power of the Curve on ati plor Ex n tio ita plo Ex Disruptive Innovation 05/07/12 The Strategic Leader Network 10
    11. 11. Sounds Nice, but how does it help me Transform the University? You need to think, Act, and Work in a strategic Way!The Strategic Leader Network - www.thestrategicleader.org
    12. 12. The SL Way!First, cultivate yourself by developing aPhilosophy, a Way of Thinking and Acting,and then, cultivate your organization byemploying the SL Method, that leads tosustained not random success. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. 12 Charlotte: NC: IAP
    13. 13. hinking in a Strategic way Involves Resetting Your Thinking and See the Future Mindset •Mindset is the way you think about things. The schemas – , i.e. cognitive filters, mental models, and assumptions held by individuals or groups which creates an outlook that causes them to act in a certain way. Pisapia & Glick-Cuenot (2010) 13
    14. 14. Be Curious LearnBe Flexible ChangeBe Wise Sense The Strategic Leader Network - www.thestrategicleader.org
    15. 15. The Mindset we NeedRequires that you are able to think through:Synthesis as well as Analysis; Nonlinearly as well as Linearly; Abstractly as well as Concretely; Creatively as well as Critically. 15
    16. 16. The ability to:1. Make and execute: CONSEQUENTIAL DECISIONSabout :  ENDS,  STRATEGIES , and  TACTICS2. Think strategically and execute change effectively;with a profound appreciation for stability. 05/07/12 The Strategic Leader Network 16
    17. 17. And, just how do I do this in real life?
    18. 18. Strategic Leadership The What?Strategic leadership is the capability to singularly, or with others, anticipate change, and create direction, alignment, commitment, and results and write it down in an actionable plan.05/07/12 Pisapia, J. (2009) The Strategic Leader. 18
    19. 19. Just how do I do this in real life? You need a Philosophy05/07/12 The Strategic Leader Network (SLN) 19
    20. 20. The Philosophy Principle #1• SLers know that that their ability to create and execute is dependent on people embracing solutions and acting upon them; not technical tools.• Takeaway - The quality of my leadership is found not in my actions, but in those of my followers. 05/07/12 Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte, NC: IAP 20
    21. 21. Principle #2“We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it in themselves.” Galileo Galilee
    22. 22. “ One of the difficulties in bringing aboutchange in an organization is that you must do so through the persons who have been mostsuccessful in that organization, no matter how faulty the system or organization is. To such persons, you see, it is the best of all possibleorganizations, because look who was selected by it and look who succeeded most within it. Yet these are the very people through whom we must bring about improvements.” George Washington First President of the United States 22
    23. 23. The Philosophy Principle # 31 Transformation Will Require a Change In Thinking… “People are very open minded about new things. As long as they are exactly like the old ones.” - Charles Kettering© 2009 Guidon Performance Solutions, LLC. All rights reserved. Guidon Performance Solutions is a licensee of LeanSigma®, a 23service mark of TBM Consulting Group.
    24. 24. The Philosophy Principle #4People want to be part ofsomething larger thanthemselves. They want tobe part of somethingthey’re really proud of, thatthey’ll fight for, sacrifice for, trust.” — 05/07/12 Howard Schultz, Starbucks (IBD/09.05) Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte, NC: IAP 24
    25. 25. The Philosophy Principle #5aThe goal of the Strategic Protocol is to establish CREATEconversations, focused on differing viewpoints anddata, SHARED aREALITY that generate coherent statement of Howstrategic intent to lead the organization to the do I much AND DIRECTIONfuture. share?The outcome is a shared reality that is neither toorigid nor too chaotic; doesn’t over-control theorganization or allow it to fall apart. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader.05/07/12 25 Charlotte, NC: IAP
    26. 26. Philosophy - Principle #5bSLers create a shared reality, and then a shared direction to get morepeople above the WE-THEY LINE where vision and aspirations live. The WE-THEY Line Decide How Deep you want to go? (c)Pisapia08 26
    27. 27. Principle #6SLers Slers Act as Gardeners Senge (1999)“Treating organizations like machineskeeps them from changing, or makeschanging them more difficult.We keep bringing in mechanics –when what we need are gardeners.”“We Keep trying to drive changewhen what we need to do iscultivate it.”
    28. 28. Sounds Nice but what does this have to do with strategic thinking? You need a method!05/07/12 The Strategic Leader Network (SLN) 28
    29. 29. Why? Click Here to Begin Game #105/07/12 The Strategic Leader Network (SLN) 29
    30. 30. T h e S t r a t e g ic T h in k in g P r o t o c o lFinding the Future and John Pisapia, Professor Florida Atlantic University jpisapia@fau.edu The Strategic Leader Network - www.thestrategicleader.org
    31. 31. Th e S L M e th o d ( S L M )What is going What needs toon here? happen here?How do wekeep making How do weit happen? make it happen?
    32. 32. Th e S L M e th o d ( S L M )Strategic Thinking Strategic Execution
    33. 33. The Strategic Thinking ProtocolThe Learn: SynthesizeProtocolout the NoiseGoal #3 Strategic Thinking - FilterLearn: Filter out the Noise –Synthesize - Create Statement- Use the Tools The Transparency Navigating Look Outside – Strategic Listening Look Inside – Determine Readiness Team Create inputs Synthesizers Statement of Intent Use the Tools Strategic Conversations Strategy Canvas A shared statement of intent forms a SWOT Analysis psychological contract with members and Action Framework guides the organization’s actions. The Strategic Leader 33
    34. 34. The Structural and Process Components of Strategic Thinking Structural Components Process Components• Coordinating • Transparency Committee • Strategic Listening• Work plans • Strategic• Data Types Conversations• Statement of Intent • Data Analysis The Strategic Leader 34
    35. 35. What is going on here? Look (c)Pisapia08 35
    36. 36. Tool #1 Use Strategic Listening to find out What is Going on Here? Strategic LOOK Listening EXTERNAL INTERNAL LISTEN Challenges Opportunities The Strategic Leader 36
    37. 37. THE CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES OFFERED BY OUR ENVIRONMENTS UNIVERSITY STATE PROFESSIONALLimited, declining, and inequitable Increased need for ongoing, Help people to Learn how to learndistributions of resources, yet meaningful professional developmentexpectations continue to rise. for leaders and teachers. Prepare people for world that isWhat knowledge or capacity do we changing; digital, virtual communities,have that people will spend their Much focus is on translating policy into ambiguity, and a global workforce.money on outside of our courses? practice; business/ Management skills; Encourage transforming and personal teaching and learning. learning.Measurable outcomes Clear Accountability will get sharper It’s all Accountability/credibilitymeasurable outcomes are what count. about results. Standards & Prescriptive Accountability is growing presence inA Department is recognized on faculty Procedures higher education. Professor role isresearch and scholarship and alumni changingwho are recognized for performance intheir profession.Unclear mission and vision leads to Differentiation How are we different? Distinctive signature What identity andcompeting expectations and a broken, How do we wish to be different? expertise make EDL unique to thefragile infrastructure. University in College, University, the field, and thetransition. profession? Do people see value in your program? What is the impact of our alums and their contributions?Top down hierarchical structure Climate of Competition Role changes Leadership is an applied field.strengthens bureaucracy. Centralized is via community colleges and Programs must address this throughthought to be better than universities. Many providers Private for coursework research about practice.decentralized. profit colleges /universities -Online Focus on actual problems not just case degrees -Certification programs. studies of others.Reactive and not proactive Research Initiatives Need solid relevant research that is distributed in a timely fashion to practitioners. The Strategic Leader 37
    38. 38. Th e S L M e th o d ( S L M ) What needs to happen here?
    39. 39. T00l #2Use Strategic Conversations to find out What Has to HappenHere? LOOK Strategic INTERNAL Conversations LISTEN EXTERNAL Opportunitie Challenges LEARN s The Strategic Leader 39
    40. 40. Tool: Use Strategic Conversations to develop the shared reality The Strategic Leader 40
    41. 41. The Strategic Thinking ProtocolWhat Has to Happen Here? LOOK Analytic Tools INTERNAL LISTEN EXTERNAL Opportunitie Challenges LEARN s Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. 05/07/12 41 Charlotte, NC: IAP
    42. 42. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. 42 Charlotte: IAP
    43. 43. Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. 43 Charlotte: IAP
    44. 44. Learn: Analyze Information You Your Subject05/07/12 Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. Charlotte, NC: IAP 44
    45. 45. Tool # 3Use The Strategy Canvas to develop a strategy Finding Value Innovation Pisapia, J. (2009). The Strategic Leader. 45 Charlotte: IAP
    46. 46. Tool #4 Use the SWOT to develop prioritiesAsk, In relation to our Vision, What are the SWOT’s facing ourorganization? Agree on 5-6 priorities Weaknesses Strengths •What can be improved? •What is our strongest business asset? •In what areas do our competitors have the edge? •Do you consider that our team strong? Why? •What necessary expertise / manpower do we •What do we offer that makes us currently lack? stand out from the rest? •Do we have cash flow problems? •What unique resources do we have? •Are we relying primarily on just a few clients or •Do we have any specific marketing expertise? customers? •Do we have a broad customer base? •Additional weaknesses •Additional strengths Opportunities Threats •What trends do you see in our industry? •What trends do you foresee that might impact •What obstacles do we face? •What is the competition doing that we’re not? our industry? •What trends present interesting opportunities •What challenges can be turned into for us? opportunities? •What have you seen in the news recently that •Are external economic forces affecting our might present an opportunity? bottom line? •Additional threats •Additional opportunities 46 The Strategic Leader
    47. 47. PrioritiesPriorities are set to focus on what the organization needs to do to achieve its aspiration. They• Are not pre-identified goals.• Are best guesses of the areas the organization should explore to work toward its aspiration.• Provide a sense of discovery and are not established in priority order.• Are flexible enough so leaders can identify initiatives in each category and have the dexterity to pursue opportunities• Describe how the organization intends to allocate resources to accomplish the mission/aspiration over time The Strategic Leader 47
    48. 48. Tool # 5Use The Strategy Map to determine specific goals in each priority! Reduce EliminateWhich Factors should be reduced below the Which factors that we take for granted shouldindustry standard? be eliminated? Create RaiseWhich factors should be created that we have Which Factors should be raised well abovenever offered before what we currently offer? 4 Actions The Strategic Leader 48
    49. 49. Use what you Learn to Inform your Thinking about Future Options… Then write them down
    50. 50. The Statement of Intent UniversityCreate an Actionable Plan The Statement of Intent • Mission • Aspiration • Core Values • Actions Priorities One page front and back
    51. 51. Statement of Intent Components Mission The Mission describes what you do - why the organization is in business in one sentence with no more than 3 clear, crisp, compelling concepts. Aspiration Aspirations clearly & concretely defines a compelling desired future in one sentence. What do you want to become? Core Values/Guiding PrinciplesCore Values describe what makes you unique – what the organization stands for and how it will act in the daily flow of activity. Actions/Priorities/Initiatives Actions FIT the enterprise to its external environment andFOCUS the organization and its members on what needs to be done to reach its aspiration. How will you move in the direction of your aspiration? Mission, Aspiration and Principles are fixed – Priorities/Initiatives are flexible.
    52. 52. The Value of a Well-Conceived Statement of Intent • Crystallizes long-term direction • Reduces risk of rudderless decision-making • Conveys organizational purpose and identity • Keeps direction-related actions of lower- level managers on common path • Helps organization prepare for the future The Strategic Leader 52
    53. 53. The Strategic Thinking ProtocolWhat Has to Happen Here? LOOK It Lights the INTERNAL Way LISTEN EXTERNAL Opportunitie Challenges LEARN s Effective in new Articulate Builds on New Strategic Intent or stable Competencies environments Manage the Change The Strategic Leader 53
    54. 54. It Lights the Way The Strategic Leader 54
    55. 55. Want More? jpisapia@fau.edu • Pisapia, J. (2009). The strategic Leader: New tactics for a globalizing world. Charlotte: NC. Information Age Publishing (in CUHK book store) • Join one of SLNs Global Learning Communities!05/07/12 The Strategic Leader Network 55

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