Lesson Objectives: To understand key media concepts, and be able to apply media theory to the analysis of a media text.Rep...
Introduction to media theory
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Introduction to media theory

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Introduction to media theory

  1. 1. Lesson Objectives: To understand key media concepts, and be able to apply media theory to the analysis of a media text.Representation – SignsThe linguist Ferdinand de Saussure suggested that the way in which we communicate with each other is through signs. A sign can be anything, a word, and object, a sound, a colour, a penguin, etc. The sign is made up of two parts, the signifier and the signified.SIGNIFIER + SIGNIFIED = SIGN (the thing itself) (the meaning it creates)Remember that a signifier can be polysemic – create more than one meaning.Whilst you watch the video note down important signifiers, and the meaning that is signified.<br />Lesson Objectives: To understand key media concepts, and be able to apply media theory to the analysis of a media text.Audience – Encoding/DecodingCultural theorist Stuart Hall suggested that media producers encode their meaning into media texts through technical codes and conventions. The preferred reading (the meaning the producers want to create) is encoded through technical elements such as camerawork, editing, sound, and mise-en-scene. This meaning is then decoded by the audience. Hall argues that the audience can respond in one of three ways: Dominant – they accept/agree with the preferred reading. Negotiated – they understand the preferred reading, and accept some elements. Oppositional – they reject/disagree with the preferred reading.Whilst you watch the video note down what you think the preferred reading is. What response do the producers want from the audience? How have they encoded this message? What different audience responses can you think of?<br />Lesson Objectives: To understand key media concepts, and be able to apply media theory to the analysis of a media text.Narrative – Binary OppositionsThe anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss suggested that narratives are structured by conflicts between pairs of opposing forces which need to be resolved in order for the narrative to move forward. These are called binary oppositions. Examples of oppositions include male/female, young/old, free/imprisoned, good/evil, etc. Levi-Strauss argues that by identifying these oppositions you will be able to identify the key themes of the narrative.Whilst you watch the video note down examples of binary oppositions used in the video. What do you think the key themes of the video are?<br />Lesson Objectives: To understand key media concepts, and be able to apply media theory to the analysis of a media text.Genre – IconographyLawrence Alloway suggested that the most effective way to analyse genre in moving image products is through the use of iconography. Iconography is the way in which specific objects can create meaning in certain circumstances. This refers to the way in which elements of mise-en-scene become visual conventions, which create meaning for the audience.Whilst you watch the video identify elements which are part of the iconography. What meaning do you they create? You will need to think carefully about the genre of the video. Remember texts can use a range of genres (hybridity). You could relate the video to the music video genre, the genre of music, the teen film/TV genre.<br />

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