Information literacy

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I gave this presentation as part of the interview process for my position as Research & Instruction Librarian at Wake Forest University.

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  • This is a question that has consumed me for the past two weeks. I must admit that it is also a question I had not thought of prior to two weeks ago.
  • When I started researching this topic, I was amazed at the sheer volume of literacies discussed.
  • Most of the literacies have something to do with technology and the Web.Health Literacy - Health literacy is defined in Health People 2010 as: "The degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions". Visual Literacy – ACRL/IRIG Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education Draft 4/20/2011. Individuals must be able to critically view, use, and produce visual content. Follows the Information Literacy Standards for Higher Education very closely.New terminology “Transliteracy,” “Metaliteracy,” and “Uniliteracy” = All the new technology, particularly the Social Web needs new terminology to describe the competencies needed to thrive in this challenging information environment. One morning last week when I was coming to work, I was listening to a story on NPR about how the USDA is replacing the Food Guide Pyramid with the new plate graphic (myplate.gov). The person being interviewed by the USDA made the statement that “nutrition literacy in the United States is low.” Once you get tuned in to listening for the use of the word “literacy,” you will find that it is a term often added to another word to make it an academic subject.
  • I would say that the ZSR staff is Starbucks literate.
  • In 1994, David Barton wrote a book titled Literacy: An Introduction to the Ecology of Written Language where he talks about the changing uses of the word “literacy” itself. He describes the concept of “emotional literacy” as metaphorical because it is not about the joy of reading, but rather it describes a desirable competence (Merchant 119). According to the Oxford English dictionary, in 1943 American Magazine used the term “economic literacy” and in 1962, the B.B.C. Handbook states “Our skills in the understanding of the medium [sc. television] and our own literacy in it are growing all the time.” But it was not until early 1990s that the use of the term began to proliferate and it seems that in the past couple of years the use of the word has begun to grow exponentially.
  • in an information society all people should have the right to information which can enhance their lives. Out of the super-abundance of available information, people need to be able to obtain specific information to meet a wide range of personal and business needs.Presidential Committee on Information Literacy: Final ReportThis report was released on January 10, 1989, in Washington, D.C.How our country deals with the realities of the Information Age will have enormous impact on our democratic way of life and on our nation's ability to compete internationally. Within America's information society, there also exists the potential of addressing many long-standing social and economic inequities. To reap such benefits, people---as individuals and as a nation---must be information literate.
  • Endorsed by the American Association for Higher Education in October 1999 and the Council of Independent Colleges (February 2004).Approved by the Board of directors of the Association of College and Research Libraries on January 18, 2000. Extends the work of the American Association of School Librarians Task Force on Information Literacy Standards which developed the K-12 standards (approved in 1998). Defines Information Literacy in more detail. An information literate person is able to:-Determine the extent of information neededAccess the needed information effectively and efficiently
  • When is was at ACRL’s Institution for Information Literacy (Immersion) in 2002, we spent a lot of time looking at these standards and developing ways to assess the outcomes. This document is often referred to in the current wave of literature about literacy. The common question is, “How does Web 2.0 and all of the emerging technologies fit into all of this?”
  • This is a term promoted by Bobbi Newman. In 2010 she co-founded Transliteracy Interest Group, LITA, ALA and currently serves as chair. Bobbi co-founded and writes for the Libraries and Transliteracy Project. She has the popular, “librarian by Day” blog.Bobbi Newman has introduced library staff around the world to the concept of "transliteracy," the ability to understand and create content on a broad range of communication media. Through her award-winning Libraries and Transliteracy blog and well-attended presentations at various national and international library conferences, she is raising awareness on the importance of connecting with users across multiple platforms. (library journal, http://www.libraryjournal.com/csp/cms/sites/LJ/LJInPrint/MoversAndShakers/profiles2011/moversandshakersNewman.csp)Starting April 4, Newman will be joining the Richland County Public Library in Columbia, SC, responsible for staff training and development. Since 2005, when Professor Sue Thomas introduced this concept in the Institute of Creative Technologies at De Montfort University, transliteracy has been taken up and explored by a broad range of academics and practitioners, from information scientists to literary theorists, artists and writers. Established in 2005, the Transliteracies Project includes scholars in the humanities, social sciences, and engineering in the University of California system (and in the future other research programs). It will establish working groups to study online reading from different perspectives; bring those groups into conjunction behind a shared technology development initiative; publish research and demonstration software; and train graduate students working at the intersections of the humanistic, social, and technological disciplines. Tranlisteracies is a UC Multi-Campus Research Group with funding from the University of California Office of the President as well as from its host campus with the UC system, UC Santa Barbara.
  • Ipri, Tom. “Introducing Transliteracy: What Does it Mean to Academic Libraries?” C&RL News (Nov. 2010): 532-33, 567. College and Research Libraries News. ACRL. 7 June 2011. <http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.full>
  • Transliteracy according to Lane WilkinsonLane is a librarian at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, made the move to full time librarianship in 2009. This was presented at Loex 2011, “Transliteracy as Pedigogy.”The best way to divide up literacy is into figurative and literal senses. Literal is how we communicate and is skillbased; figurative is how we evaluate and understand information.
  • Mackey, Thomas P., and Trudi E. Jacobson. “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy.” College & Research Libraries Jan. 2011: 62-78. College and Research Libraries, ACRL. Web. 8 June 2011. http://librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com/2011/05/09/transliteracy-loex-2011/“In summary, metal literacy provides a conceptual framework for information literacy that diminishes theoretical differences, builds practical connections, and reinforces central lifelong learning goals among different literacy types.
  • Hobbs, Renee. Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action. Washington: Aspen Institute Communications and Society Program, 2010. The Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy. Web. 8 June 2011. “Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action, a new policy paper by Renee Hobbs, Professor at the School of Communications and the College of Education at Temple University and founder of its Media Education Lab, proposes a detailed plan that positions digital and media literacy as an essential life skill and outlines steps that policymakers, educators, and community advocates can take to help Americans thrive in the digital age.”Digital literacy means learning how to work the information and communication technologies in a networked environment, as well as understanding the social, cultural and ethical issues that go along with the use of these technologies. Media literacy is the ability to access, analyze, evaluate, create, reflect upon, and act with the information products that media disseminate. (http://www.knightcomm.org/digital-and-media-literacy-a-plan-of-action/)Renee Hobbs is a Professor of Communication at Temple University’s School of Communications and Theater.In October 2009, the Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy released its reports, Informing Communities: Sustaining Democracy in the Digital Age, with 15 recommendations to better meet community information needs.
  • This site was launched in May of this year and it is for people who teach digital literacy classes.
  • Personally, I see information literacy as the mother ship where all of the other literacies come to land. All literacies are welcome and needed on this quest to level the playing field so that everyone can know how knowledge is organized, how to find information, and how to use information in such a way that others can learn from them.
  • Information literacy

    1. 1. Joy GambillJune 9, 2011
    2. 2. UniliteracyHealth Literacy Computer Literacy Technology Literacy Digital Literacy
    3. 3. 1. Grande2. Tall3. Venti4. Short
    4. 4.  Literacy: “The quality or state of being literate; knowledge of letters; conditions in respect to education.” "literacy, n.". OED Online. March 2011. Oxford University Press. 7 June 2011 <http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/109054?redirectedFrom=literacy>. Literate: “Acquainted with letters or literature; educated, instructed, learned.” "literate, adj. and n.". OED Online. March 2011. Oxford University Press. 7 June 2011 <http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/109070?redirectedFrom=literate>.
    5. 5.  American Library Association’s Presidential Committee on Information Literacy: Final Report  Released on January 10, 1989 in Washington, D.C.  “In an information society all people should have the right to information which can enhance their lives.”  “To be information literate, a person must be able to recognize when information is needed and have the ability to locate, evaluate, and use effectively the needed information.”
    6. 6.  “Ultimately, information literate people are those who have learned how to learn. They know how to learn because they know how knowledge is organized, how to find information, and how to use information in such a way that others can learn from them. They are people prepared for lifelong learning, because they can always find the information needed for any task or decision at hand.”
    7. 7.  An information literate individual is able to:  Determine the extent of information needed  Access the needed information effectively and efficiently  Evaluate information and its sources critically  Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base  Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose  Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and access and use information ethically and legally.
    8. 8.  Information Literacy and Information Technology  A 1999 report from the National Research Council promotes “fluency” with information technology.  Information literacy focuses on content, communication, analysis, information searching, and evaluation.  Information technology fluency focuses on a deep understanding of technology and graduated, increasingly skilled use of it.  Information literate individuals necessarily develop some technology skills.
    9. 9.  Uses five standards, twenty-two performance indicators , and eighty-six outcomes What do we do with this?
    10. 10.  Transliteracy is the ability to read, write and interact across a range of platforms, tools and media from signing and orality through handwriting, print, TV, radio and film, to digital social networks. http://nlabnetworks.typepad.com/transliteracy/ Promoted in the US by Bobbi Newman, 2011 Library Journal Mover and Shaker Originated with the cross-disciplinary Transliteracies Project group headed by Alan Liu from the Department of English at the University of California-Santa Barbara. Professor Sue Thomas of the Institute of Creative Technologies at De Montfort University in the UK attended the conference and developed many of the key concepts.
    11. 11.  It is about the interaction between text literacy, visual literacy, and digital literacy. Thomas states, “transliteracy is a move toward a unifying ecology of not just media, but of all literacies relevant to reading, writing, interaction, and culture.” Emphasizes the benefits of knowledge sharing via social networks and creating an information narrative that evolves and adds value.Ipri, Tom. “Introducing Transliteracy: What Does it Mean to Academic Libraries?” C&RL News (Nov. 2010): 532-33, 567. College and Research Libraries News. ACRL. Web. 7 June 2011. <http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.full>
    12. 12. Figurative Literacy Literal Literacyhttp://librariesandtransliteracy.wordpress.com/2011/05/09/transliteracy-loex-2011/
    13. 13.  “Metaliteracy provides a conceptual framework for information literacy that diminishes theoretical differences, builds practical connections, and reinforces central lifelong learning goals among different literacy types.” (Mackey 76) ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards do not “fully address the broader knowledge required for producing dynamic online content as an individual and in collaboration with others.” (Mackey 74) Mackey, Thomas P., and Trudi E. Jacobson. “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy.” College & Research Libraries Jan. 2011: 62-78. College and Research Libraries, ACRL. Web. 8 June 2011.
    14. 14.  It is an online portal that makes it easy to find resources and tools that teach computer and online skills launched in May 2011.
    15. 15.  Psychology Information Literacy Standards (June 2010) Information Literacy Standards for Anthropology and Sociology (January 2008) Information Literacy Standards for Science and Technology (June 2006) Information Literacy Standards for Teacher Education (May 2011) Political Science Research Competency Guidelines (July 2008) Research Competency Guidelines for Literatures in English (June 2007)
    16. 16. Badke, William. “Media, ICT, and Information Literacy.” Bnet, September/October, 2009. Web. 8 June 2011.Coiro, Julie, Michele Knobel, Colin Lankshear, and Donald J. Leu. Handbook of Research on New Literacies. New York: Lawrence Erlbaum, 2008.Eshet-Alkalai, Yoram. “Digital Literacy: A Conceptual Framework for Survival Skill in the Digital Era.” Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia 13.1 (2004): 93-106. Proquest. Web. 7 June 2011.Eshet-Alkali, Yoram, and Yair Amichai-Hamburger. “Experiments in Digital Literacy.” CyberPsychology & Behavior 7.4 (2004): 421-29. Mary Ann Liebert Publishers. Web. 7 June 2011.Ferreiro, Emilia. “Librarians and Basic Education Teachers in the Context of ‘Digital Literacy.’”IFLA Journal 31.1 (2005): 35-44. Sage. Web. 6 June 2011.Hobbs, Renee. Digital and Media Literacy: A Plan of Action. Washington: Aspen Institute Communications and Society Program, 2010. The Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities in a Democracy. Web. 8 June 2011.Holman, Lucy. “Millennial Students’ Mental Models of Search: Implications for Academic Librarians and Database Developers.” The Journal of Academic Librarianship 37.1 (2011): 19-27. Library Literature and Information Technology Full Text. Web. 8 June 2011.
    17. 17. Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. ACRL. Association of College and Research Libraries, 2011. Web. 8 June 2011.Ipri, Tom. “Introducing Transliteracy: What Does it Mean to Academic Libraries?” C&RL News , Nov. 2010: 532-33, 567. College and Research Libraries News. ACRL. Web. 7 June 2011. http://crln.acrl.org/content/71/10/532.fullKoltay, Tibor. “The Media and the Literacies: Media Literacy, Information Literacy, Digital Literacy. “ Media, Culture & Society 33.2 (2011): 211-21. Sage. Web. 7 June 2011.Mackey, Thomas P., and Trudi E. Jacobson. “Reframing Information Literacy as a Metaliteracy.” College & Research Libraries Jan. 2011: 62-78. College and Research Libraries, ACRL. Web. 7 June 2011.

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