Illustrators

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  • This interest led him inevitably to Europe. He lived in Venice and Paris.
  • He scored an immediate success, rapidly acquiring the kind of prestigious editorial commissions too often allocated to photographers, from Lei ,Per Lui in Italy, Vogue in the USA, the Face in Britain, as well as Jill Magazine , Marie Claire Le Monde and City Magazine in France.
  • Tony Viramontes belonged to a new generation of artists who knew how to capitalize on their talent.
  • "It is extremes and contrasts that inspire me - an enormous lady in the street leading a tiny dog on a leash, for example. It is essential to capture the image, not a detail, not a garment or an expression, but an impression. Of the hundreds of sketches I might make for one drawing, it is almost always the first drawing which states the essential."
  • For the next 20 years Barbier led a group from the Ecole des Beaux Arts who were nicknamed by Vogue “The Knights of the Bracelet”—a tribute to their fashionable and flamboyant mannerisms and style of dress.
  • During his career Barbier also turned his hand to jewellery, glass and wallpaper design, wrote essays and many articles for the prestigious Gazette du bon ton.
  • He also illustrates the highly elegant, limited editions of novels and poetry
  • In addition to his tireless and continuously innovative work as an illustrator,
  • By reconstructing the diverse contexts of his production and comparing them to the artistic movements and avant-garde of that period, the exhibition focuses on the manifold aspects of the artist’s creativity, the author of renowned images - including the black panther that is Cartier’s symbol. After the First World War, he works for Gazette du Bon Ton and Vie Parisienne as both editor and journalist, writing articles, society news and stories that he signs either with his real name or various pen-names
  • Illustrators

    1. 1. Tony Viramontes "It Is Essential To Capture The Image, Not ADetail, Not A Garment Or An Expression, But An Impression." Tony Viramontes, 1959-1988
    2. 2. Early lifeTony Viramontes or Viramontez , was bornin 1960 in Los Angeles, USA, of Spanish and Mexican parents. He studied fine art and photography in New York, before switching to fashion and beauty illustration.
    3. 3. career Viramontes made his debut in the late 1970s. Viramontes also worked with some of the most renowned names in fashion including Yves St.Laurent, Valentino, Versace, Chanel, Perry Ellis, Claude Montana and Rochas cosmetics.
    4. 4. Some of his illustrations
    5. 5. His work style His striking images are of strong, dominant, aggressive yet feminine women, sensuousmen, smoldering and smokey-eyed, who vibrate with New Wave energy. He explored and mastered several techniques and styles, from drawing -direct and hard, supple and coloured - to video and painting with felt tip market pens over photographs.
    6. 6. Inspiration Viramontes elegant art is fused with humour and fantasy, he found his inspiration everywhere, in the street, in music and dance.He had been experimenting with photo-illustration, drawing over photographs and he planned to direct films.
    7. 7. Works
    8. 8. conclusionIn 1984, an exhibition of his work was held in Paris.Tony Viramontes had great artisticpotential, but he died in 1988 at the age of only 28.
    9. 9. George Barbier
    10. 10. About George Barbier• George Barbier (1882 – 1932) was one of the great French illustrators of the early 20th century.• Born in Nantes, France on October 10, 1882, Barbier was 29 years old when he mounted his first exhibition in 1911 and was subsequently swept to the forefront of his profession with commissions to design theatre .
    11. 11. Career & colleagues• Included in this elite circle were Bernard Boutet de Monvel and Pierre Brissaud (both of whom were Barbier’s first cousins), Paul Iribe, Georges Lepape, and Charles Martin.• During his career Barbier also turned his hand to jewellery, glass and wallpaper .• In the mid 1920s he worked with Erte to design sets and costumes for the Folies Bergere and in 1929 he wrote the introduction for Erte’s acclaimed exhibition and achieved mainstream popularity through his regular appearances in L’Illustration magazine.
    12. 12. As an illustrator• A versatile artist, he produces all kinds of different work over the years: book illustrations, costume designs for the cinema and theatre, fans, jewellery, glass, fabrics, wallpaper and above all, fashion illustrations, the most successful and refined expression of his creation.• From 1917 on he starts working on personal publishing projects, illustrating articles for the most important writers and journalists, and signing them himself .
    13. 13. WorksHis countless designs for theatre costumes:• costumes for les Folies Bergère in 1923,• the stage design and costumes for Casanova• La dernière nuit de Don Juan by Maurice Rostand, and• the woodcuts Vingt-cinq costumes pour le théâtre (1927).
    14. 14. Works• His early work with the press is with comic journals such as le Rire or la Baionette His meeting with Lucien Vogel leads to many more partnerships for women’s magazines in particular; he not only does illustrations for Gazette du Bon Ton, but also for Le Jardin des dames et des modes,
    15. 15. Conclusion• Barbier died in 1932 at the very pinnacle of his success.• After the First World War, he works for Gazette du Bon Ton and Vie Parisienne as both editor and journalist, writing articles, society news and stories that he signs either with his real name or various pen-names

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