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Medical Doctor, Maker Designer?

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I was fortunate to give this talk because of the magic of Twitter. I gave versions of these talks for the Brown University Emergency Department, and a Durham Design Thinking Course! Special thanks to @JBaruchMD, @meganranney, @jonodoc, & @KLDonohue85!

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Medical Doctor, Maker Designer?

  1. 1. Joyce Lee, MD, MPH Doctor as Designer Twitter: @joyclee @healthbyus Medical Doctor, Maker Designer?
  2. 2. I have no ties to any pharmaceutical companies Social Media/Web Editor of JAMA Pediatrics
  3. 3. Associate Professor School of Medicine/ Public Health My academic Identity:
  4. 4. I have no formal training as a designer
  5. 5. Folk in black turtlenecks and designer glasses working on small things like the iWatch This is a medical designer
  6. 6. “A pediatric endocrinologist who spends her days seeing patients in clinic and writing grants & papers that no one will ever read?” This is a medical designer? No black turtleneck? No designer glasses?
  7. 7. Design = Change
  8. 8. Part 1: A Personal Design Experiment
  9. 9. “B”
  10. 10. #design #fail
  11. 11. #lazytigermother
  12. 12. 700+ students & 40 teachers
  13. 13. “ T w o v i d e o s r e c e n t l y impressed me with their use of illustration and narration to educate an audience about health…What interests me is how approachable and i n f o r m a t i v e t h e y a r e , regardless of the production value.” -@SusannahFox
  14. 14. #designsuccess #proudtigermother 1683 views!
  15. 15. http://ihavefoodallergies.tumblr.com
  16. 16. B’s Trilogy Part 2: Ingredients and Food Handling
  17. 17. B’s Trilogy Part 3: Asthma
  18. 18. DESIGN FAIL
  19. 19. Design Insights about the Production of Health and the Future of Medicine
  20. 20. We were experts
  21. 21. We were makers
  22. 22. We were collaborators
  23. 23. Patient as expert maker collaborator #futureofhealthcare
  24. 24. Part #2 of the journey: “Learning to design is learning to see” -Oliver Reichenstein
  25. 25. #design #suckiness
  26. 26. The needle is opposite to the cap, which is counter- intuitive Design Flaw #1
  27. 27. >15,000 Unintentional injections from Epi-Pens in the US between 1994-2007 There were
  28. 28. 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 < 6 yrs 6-12 yrs18-64 yrs Total 13-17 yrs >64 yrs Unintentional Injections with Epinephrine auto-injectors Simons, 2010
  29. 29. Greenberg, 2010 “Despite instructions rendered on the package insert, a large number of health care professionals including nurses, paramedics, and physicians inadvertently self-inject while attempting to administer the EpiPen to patients. One recent report chronicles a 6- year experience at a single US poison center that fielded 365 epinephrine injections to the hand.” Trained health care providers can’t even use the pen properly!
  30. 30. Life or death is stressful! Don’t make me think! Design Flaw #2
  31. 31. It’s an awkward size, & doesn’t fit in your pockets Design Flaw #3
  32. 32. Whoa the cap & needle are at the same end!
  33. 33. It tells you what to do!
  34. 34. “Bad Design Causes Injury” “Good Design Saves Lives!” Design Insight
  35. 35. It’s thinner and shorter & fits in your pocket!
  36. 36. The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted. Restart your computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, you may have to delete the image and then insert it again. The image cannot be displayed. Your computer may not have enough memory to open the image, or the image may have been corrupted. Restart your computer, and then open the file again. If the red x still appears, you may have to delete the image and then insert it again. And it reminds me when to refill
  37. 37. “Aesthetics Do Matter for Health” Design Insight
  38. 38. It was designed by patients!
  39. 39. “patients frequently do not understand how and when to use [the epi-pen].” Sicherer, 2011 In medicine, we often blame the patient
  40. 40. “patients frequently do not understand how and when to use [the epi-pen].” Sicherer, 2011 But is it a patient problem or is it a design problem? Design flaw: The needle is opposite to the cap
  41. 41. “Children had only used their EpiPen device in 29% of recurrent anaphylaxis reactions. This is perhaps unsurprising because a fear of needles/injections is common” Sicherer, 2011 In medicine, we often blame the patient
  42. 42. “Children had only used their EpiPen device in 29% of recurrent anaphylaxis reactions. This is perhaps unsurprising because a fear of needles/injections is common” Sicherer, 2011 But is it a patient problem or is it a design problem? Design Flaw: It’s confusing to use in a scary emergency
  43. 43. “patients often forget [the device], allow it to expire” Sicherer, 2011 In medicine, we often blame the patient
  44. 44. But is it a patient problem or is it a design problem? “patients often forget [the device], allow it to expire” Sicherer, 2011 Design Flaw:It’s too long & wide & where’s the app to go w/it?
  45. 45. Patient problems are really design problems Joyce Lee, MD Medical Designer
  46. 46. Fix the design, and it’s no longer the patient’s problem Joyce Lee, MD Medical Designer
  47. 47. Let patients and caregivers design, and they will fix the problem! The Nightscout Project
  48. 48. 75% of children fail to achieve recommended blood sugar goals in Type 1 Diabetes
  49. 49. 75% of healthcare providers/ systems fail to help children achieve recommended blood sugar goals in Type 1 Diabetes
  50. 50. Part #3 of the Journey #polarvortex
  51. 51. Applying Design Thinking to Healthcare
  52. 52. Curricular collaborations
  53. 53. Design Workshops
  54. 54. Human-Centered Design Thinking User-Centered Problem Solving
  55. 55. Patient-Centered Design Thinking Participatory Problem Solving
  56. 56. Empathy PrototypeDefine Ideate Test
  57. 57. Empathy Understand a problem before solving it
  58. 58. Define Patient-defined problem
  59. 59. Ideate Collaborative, creative brainstorming
  60. 60. Prototype Sketch, draw, glue, code
  61. 61. Test Iterative Feedback from User
  62. 62. Design My Diabetes Solution
  63. 63. #diabeticons
  64. 64. Diabetesevangelist.com
  65. 65. @jakiebones & @TheTrevorTorres
  66. 66. “A” & @robokittycat
  67. 67. Maker Movement Do It Yourself (DIY) Learning by Doing Peer-to-Peer
  68. 68. “The essential democratization of the technology has happened; once you put the tools in the hands of everybody, it liberates the ideas and creativity of so many people” -Chris Anderson
  69. 69. Maker Movement Participatory Design =
  70. 70. DIY = Expert Learning by doing = Maker Peer-to-Peer = Collaborator
  71. 71. We #makehealth
  72. 72. Design = A Distraction A critical tool for the creation of health
  73. 73. Expert “Doctors are experts, not patients     #cultureofhealthcare
  74. 74. “Only certified health professionals should be creating health”     Maker #cultureofhealthcare
  75. 75. “Health is created doctor TO patient”   Collaborator #cultureofhealthcare
  76. 76. The Secret Life of Medical Devices
  77. 77. Hacking Diabetes Workshop
  78. 78. Resident Signout Deserves Great Design
  79. 79. MD to Patient Passive Solitary
  80. 80. Patient to Patient Active Collaborative
  81. 81. “Don't cry” (said the boy to his mom)
  82. 82. #waitingwaitingwaiting
  83. 83. HealthDesignBy.Us Twitter: @healthbyus FB: healthdesignby.us Our patient experts, John Marshall, Matt Kenyon, Patricia Anderson, Nancy Benovich Gilby, Emily Puckett Rogers, Scott Olson, Amy Cohn, Patricia Abbott, Kelly Parent, John Costik, Jose Gomez- Marquez, Emily Hirschfeld, Ghada Mustapha, Jacob Hendricks, Margot Robert, Xiaoying He, Trevor Torres, Nick Reid, Sam Oliver, Charles Woodson Research Fund, UM Provost, & the healthdesignby.us virtual community
  84. 84. #designthinkinghellokitty

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