Module 14 ~ Constructivism

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Module 14 ~ Constructivism

  1. 1. MODULE 14 ~ CONSTRUCTIVISM Knowledge Construction/ Concept Learning Dianara . Rhoda . Guia . Dianara . Rhoda . Guia . Dianara . Rhoda . Guia .
  2. 2. CONSTRUCTIVISM VIEWS OF CONSTRUCTIVISM CHARACTERISTICS OF CONSTRUCTIVISM ORGANIZING KNOWLEDGE INDIVIDUAL CONSTRUCTIVISM SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIVISM
  3. 3. CONSTRUCTIVISM • can be described as a theory that deals with the way people create meaning of the world through a series of individual constructs.(Wikepedia) • It signifies that teaching involves giving opportunities for learners to explore and discover. Learners construct their own meaning and generate insights.(textbook)
  4. 4. TWO VIEWS ON CONSTRUCTIVISM • * also called cognitive constructivism • * indirect instruction • * largely based on Piaget’s Theory • * child-centered and discovery learning • *based on Vygotsky’s theory • *conditions of knowledge is shared by two or more people • *social and interaction context 1. INDIVIDUAL CONSTRUCTIVISM 2. SOCIAL CONSTRUCTIVISM
  5. 5. CHARACTERISTICS OF CONSTRUCTIVISM • Learners construct Understanding. They see learners who interpret new information based on what they already know. • New learning depends on current understanding. Background Information is very important. According to Eggen and Kauchak, there are four characteristics of Constructivism.
  6. 6. • Learning is facilitated by social interaction. Learning communities help learners take responsibility for their own leaning. Teachers play as a facilitator rather than an expert one. • Meaningful learning occurs within authentic learning tasks. Involves learning activity that involves constructing knowledge and understanding needed when applied in the real world.
  7. 7. ORGANIZING KNOWLEDGE CONCEPTS • A way of grouping or categorizing objects or events in our mind. Includes: model, discuss, illustrate, explain, assist
  8. 8. Concepts as Feature List Involves learning specific features that characterize positive instance of the concept. A. Defining Feature – characteristic present in ALL instances. • For example: Because ALL triangles should have three sides. If doesn’t, then it is not a triangle. B. Correlation Feature – present in many positive instances but not essential for concept relationship. • For example: a mother is loving, being loving is a feature commonly present in the concept of mother. But a mother may not be loving.
  9. 9. Concepts as Prototypes • Prototype is an idea or a visual image of a typical example. It is usually formed based on the positive instances that learners encounter most often. • Example: close your eyes now and for a moment think of a cat. • Exemplars represent a variety of examples. It allows learners to know that an example under a concept may have variability. • Example: A learner’s concept of vegetable may include a wide variety of different examples like cauliflower, kangkong, cabbage, squash and so on. Concepts as Exemplars
  10. 10. Make Concept-learning Effective • Provide a clear definition of the concept • Make the defining features very concrete and prominent • Give a variety of positive instances • Give negative instances • Give a “best example” or prototype • Provide opportunity for learners to identify positive and negative instances • Ask learners to think of their own example of the concept • Point out how concepts can be related to each other
  11. 11. Schema is an organized body of knowledge about something. It is like a file of information you hold in your mind about something. Like a schema of what a teacher is. Script is a schema that includes a series of predictable events of a specific activity. • Examples: knowing the series of steps done when we visit a doctor
  12. 12. Applying Constructivism in Facilitating Learning • Aim to make learners understand a few key ideas in an in-depth manner, rather than taking up so many topics superficially. • Give varied examples. • Provide opportunities for experimentation. • Provide lots of opportunities for quality interaction. • Have lots on hands-on activities. • Relate your topic to real life situations • Do not depend on the explanation method all the time.
  13. 13. Group yourselves according to your major. Think of a topic related to your field of specialization. Indicate how you can apply Constructivism for your students to construct their own understanding of the topic.

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