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A Corporate Approach To Social Media - by Jos Schuurmans / Cluetail

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Jos Schuurmans looks at "social" or "participatory" media, the "social web" and "New Internet" from a corporate organizational viewpoint.

He lays out a conceptual framework for understanding where we are at this point, as well as a general approach to social media through "change from the inside out".

Published in: Business, Technology
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A Corporate Approach To Social Media - by Jos Schuurmans / Cluetail

  1. 1. But what are we talking about, really ? CC: Clearly Ambiguous - http://www.flickr.com/photos/clearlyambiguous/40437932/
  2. 2. A Corporate Approach to Social Media
  3. 4. In order to become truly socially-networked, organizations need to look at both their internal social media practices as well as at the ways to engage with their markets on the New Internet. In this presentation, Jos Schuurmans looks at "social" or "participatory" media, the "social web" and "New Internet" from a corporate organizational viewpoint. He lays out a conceptual framework for understanding where we are at this point, as well as a general approach to social media through "change from the inside out". A Corporate Approach to Social Media
  4. 5. Jos Schuurmans Founder & CEO Cluetail Ltd. Mikkeli, Finland www.cluetail.com +358 50 59 33 006 [email_address] www.josschuurmans.com twitter.com/josschuurmans A Corporate Approach to Social Media #GranSM
  5. 7. So let me tell you a little bit about my biases...
  6. 8. “ The best Clues are in the Tail”
  7. 9. A typical popularity distribution of a product category in the physical world is a “power law” graph.
  8. 10. A typical popularity distribution of digital products is a “Long Tail” graph.
  9. 11. Scoping 'social media': What are the issues? 1. The rise of social media... 2. What do we mean by 'social media'? 3. WHY should we get involved? 4. HOW (much) should we get involved? CC: Bob Jagendorf - http://www.flickr.com/photos/bobjagendorf/361925178/
  10. 12. Number crunching * More than 3.5bn pieces of content (web links, news stories, blog posts, etc.) shared each week on Facebook. * There are now 11m LinkedIn users across Europe. * Towards the end of last year, the average number of tweets per hour was around 1.3m. * Purpose-built Facebook pages have created more than 5.3bn fans. * 15% of bloggers spend 10 or more hours each week blogging, according to Technorati. * At the current rate, Twitter will process almost 10bn tweets in a single year. * About 70% of Facebook users are outside the USA. * More than 250 Facebook applications have over a million combined users each month. * 70% of bloggers are organically talking about brands on their blog. * More than 80,000 websites have implemented Facebook Connect since December 2008 and more than 60m Facebook users engage with it across these external sites each month. http://econsultancy.com/blog/5324-20+-mind-blowing-social-media-statistics-revisited
  11. 13. Pew Internet & American Life Project http://www.pewinternet.org/PPF/r/527/press_coverageitem.asp
  12. 14. But what are we talking about, really ? CC: Clearly Ambiguous - http://www.flickr.com/photos/clearlyambiguous/40437932/
  13. 16. ” Social media” is a tautology because media have always been social. The same goes for ”social networking”: networking is by definition a social activity. What's the problem with ”social”? CC: clairity - http://www.flickr.com/photos/clairity/154640125/
  14. 17. The media and networking have always been social, but the Internet hasn't – or at least not as much as it is today. Hence, what we really are talking about is the Internet catching up with reality, through new capabilities which we have come to call Web 2.0, or the 'Social Web' The reason why we talk about ”social” is because of Web 1.0 CC: g-hat - http://www.flickr.com/photos/g-hat/1321573829/
  15. 19. When the Internet was still small, slow and difficult to use, it would only let us do a few things, like sending letters and reading brochures. We could do most of these things offline, too. The Net is mimicking us... and getting pretty good at it CC: antony_mayfield - http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonymayfield/2255188757/
  16. 20. Then businesses figured out how to sell stuff on the Internet, and media started to offer news and other content online. Even user-generated content! The brick-and-mortar world started to feel the heat of new competition. The Net is mimicking us... and getting pretty good at it CC: antony_mayfield - http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonymayfield/2255188757/
  17. 21. And now, the Net is developing things which we really cannot do in real life: Social software lets consumers help each other find the things they are looking for, and recommend things they didn't even know to look for. The Net is mimicking us... and getting pretty good at it CC: antony_mayfield - http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonymayfield/2255188757/
  18. 22. Right! Both in media and in (other) business, social media help consumers cut out the middle man: people no longer rely exclusively on ”messages” from journalists, corporate communicators or PR agencies. Instead, they engage directly in conversation online. The Net is mimicking us... and getting pretty good at it CC: antony_mayfield - http://www.flickr.com/photos/antonymayfield/2255188757/
  19. 23. ” Gone are the days when the consumers would come and dutifully arrange themselves in front of the TV or radio – at specific times even! – just waiting to hear from us. We could tell them the same stories over and over again, until the message sank in. Well, today, most of the chairs are empty. And the folks who do show up refuse to look or listen to us.” - Dan Wieden, founder of advertizing agency Wieden+Kennedy. CC: fazen - http://www.flickr.com/photos/fazen/24239145/
  20. 24. (Via Graeme Wood)‏
  21. 25. (Via Graeme Wood)‏
  22. 26. ” (...) Content isn't king. If I sent you to a desert island and gave you the choice of taking your friends or your movies, you'd choose your friends -- if you chose the movies, we'd call you a sociopath. Conversation is king. Content is just something to talk about. (...)” Cory Doctorow on BoingBoing: http://www.boingboing.net/2006/10/10/disney-exec-piracy-i.html CC: fazen - http://www.flickr.com/photos/fazen/24239145/
  23. 27. 1. Finding information 2. Communication 3. Building relationships 4. Conducting transactions The Internet is for: CC: Akuppa - http://www.flickr.com/photos/90664717@N00/416359819/
  24. 28. And if you don't “get” that... The Cluetrain Manifesto - http://cluetail.org
  25. 29. “ The best Clues are in the Tail”
  26. 30. Doc Searls   "Markets consist of conversations, relationships and transactions." Creative Commons Attribution: David Sifry http://www.flickr.com/photos/dsifry/2105160960/
  27. 31. Pertinent stuff on the move beyond search and how to maximize serendipity.
  28. 32. Next frontier: evolution of recommendation 1. Recommendation based on content; 2. Recommendation based on behavior, 3. Recommendation based on friends.
  29. 33. Cluetail connects people to the most relevant people and the most relevant content through the Long Tail of Conversations. Iceland Volcano Social Media in Business
  30. 34. To this end, Cluetail develops recommendation technology . Iceland Volcano Social Media in Business
  31. 35. What we offer: Cluetail Lunch Date ( http://lunchdate.cluetail.com ): Connecting people to “significant strangers” through social objects Cluetail Radar: ( http://radar.cluetail.com ) Media intelligence, identifying relevant information/conversations Cluetail Conversation Central: ( http://conversationcentral.cluetail.com ) Conversation life-cycle management, analysis and recommendation system Cluetail Services ( http://www.cluetail.com/services ): Social media / communications auditing; strategy development and implementation; operational support; knowledge transfer
  32. 36. Cultural impact: Secrecy, privacy, publicy Stowe Boyd - http://www.stoweboyd.com/message/2009/12/30/secrecy-privacy-publicy.html CC: loiclemeur - http://www.flickr.com/photos/loiclemeur/3401678945/
  33. 37. From a business point of view, we should consider the Internet and the public social media domain primarily as a market place of conversations. The external relevance CC: Solarshakti - http://www.flickr.com/photos/73109955@N00/86481971/
  34. 38. WHY to engage in public social media? The reactive approach: <ul><li>Social media seen as a threat to 'business as usual'. </li></ul><ul><li>A new element to the media mix. </li></ul><ul><li>To &quot;manage&quot; the online conversations around one's brand requires additional effort. </li></ul><ul><li>In order to manage their reputation, brands need to listen in to the public conversation, correct misconceptions or negative exposure, and be prepared for social media crisis communications. </li></ul>
  35. 39. WHY to engage in public social media? The interactive approach: Social media seen as an opportunity: <ul><li>to build reputation and brand value; </li></ul><ul><li>to build new business models and revenue streams.
  36. 40. (depending on the nature of your brand and business). </li></ul>
  37. 41. Example: Levi's implementation of Facebook's social recommendation
  38. 42. Example: Levi's implementation of Facebook's social recommendation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ed5vJeaEuzA
  39. 43. WHY to deploy social media internally? 1. Crisis management . 2. Agility. 3. Organizational Identification (OI)‏. 4. Alignment of the internal culture and ways of working with the external business environment, strategy, brand perception and value proposition.
  40. 44. WHY social media internally? -> 1. Crisis management
  41. 45. WHY social media internally? -> 2. Agility “ Blogs help spread ideas faster, make the organizational hierarchy flatter, and speed up decision making.” Bob Iannucci, former CTO at Nokia
  42. 46. WHY social media internally? -> 3. OI According to some literature, Organizational Identification (OI) should be the ultimate goal of internal communications. It's brought about through (1) internal marketing, and (2) inspirational leadership. Internal marketing means: selling the internal job market to employees. Inspirational leadership is what motivates employees to follow their leaders. (Journal of Marketing, Vol. 73 (March 2009), 123-145)
  43. 47. “ You have no choice!” - As reported by eWeek: http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Messaging-and-Collaboration/Digital-Natives-Will-Drive-Web-20-into-Your-Business/
  44. 48. Study: college students can't live without the Net Being forced off-line for 24 hours, college students become physically ill and depressed. http://withoutmedia.wordpress.com/
  45. 49. Niall Cook has a really good story about social sofware for internal purposes: http://www.slideshare.net/niallcook/enterprise-20-presentation-648032?nocache=3504 ” (...) ‘digital natives’ that are so immersed in digital culture that they are completely unconcerned about the effects of their technology choices on their organizations. (...)”
  46. 50. WHY social media internally? -> 4. internal/external alignment CC: mackarus - http://www.flickr.com/photos/mackarus/3880875284/
  47. 51. WHY social media internally? -> 4. internal/external alignment
  48. 52. 1. In Cluetrain parlance, we say “markets are conversations”. So the diagram above represents your market, or “The Conversation”. That is demarkated by the outer circle “y”. 2. There is a smaller, inner circle “x”. 3. So the entire market, the “conversation” is seperated into two distinct parts, the inner area “A” and the outer area “B”. 4. Area “A” represents your company, the people supplying the market. We call that “The Internal Conversation”. 5. Area “B” represents the people in the market who are not making, but buying. Otherwise know as the customers. We call that “The External Conversation”. Hugh MacLeod: the porous membrane
  49. 53. 5. Area “B” represents the people in the market who are not making, but buying. Otherwise know as the customers. We call that “The External Conversation”. 6. So each market from a corporate point of view has an internal and external conversation. What seperates the two is a membrane, otherwise known as “x”. 7. Every company’s membrane is different, and controlled by a host of different technical and cultural factors. 8. Ideally, you want A and B to be identical as possible, or at least, in sync. The things that A is passionate about, B should also be passionate about. This we call “alignment”. A good example would be Apple. The people at Apple think the iPod is cool, and so do their customers. They are aligned. 9. When A and B are no longer aligned is when the company starts getting into trouble. When A starts saying their gizmo is great and B is telling everybody it sucks, then you have serious misalignment. 10. So how do you keep misalignment from happening? Hugh MacLeod: the porous membrane
  50. 54. 11. The answer lies in “x”, the membrane that seperates A from B. The more porous the membrane, the easier it is for conversations between A and B, the internal and external, to happen. The easier for the conversations on both side of membrane “x” to adjust to the other, to become like the other. 12. And nothing, and I do mean nothing, pokes holes in the membrane better than blogs. You want porous? You got porous. Blogs punch holes in membranes like like it was Swiss cheese. 13. The more porous your membrane (“x”), the easier it is for the internal conversation to inform and align with the external conversation, and vice versa. 14. Not to mention it makes misalignment, if it happens, a lot easier to repair. 15. Of course this begs the question, why have a membrane “x” at all? Why bother with such a hierarchy? But that’s another story.xt Hugh MacLeod: the porous membrane
  51. 55. It's either that, or else... The Cluetrain Manifesto - http://cluetail.org
  52. 56. The Biggest Challenge = your corporate culture Lectures -> conversations Managed org. -> networked org. Control -> flow Need-to-know-> publicy Innovation at the center -> innovation at the edges
  53. 57. An integrated social media strategy • What is you desired state? • What is you current state? • Bridge from your current state to your desired state.
  54. 58. Current State Analysis: What is your desired state? 1. How do social media relate to your brand and core business? 2. Where do you need to be on the reactive – interactive scale? 3. How much do you need to engage externally? 4. How much should you engage internally?
  55. 59. Current State Analysis: What is your current state? What are you doing already? Map your external and internal social media landscape.
  56. 60. Current State Analysis: Bridge from your current state to your desired state Build a road map to get you from where you are to where you want to be. Test the waters, take baby steps and learn as you go along. Remember that change happens from the inside out.
  57. 61. While ”social media” are on the rise, media and networking have always been ”social”. Web 2.0 technologies and social software help consumers ” cut out the middle man” and engage directly online. Hence, the Internet is relevant to businesses as a market place of conversations. Your strategic need to get involved can be (externally and/or internally) reactive and/or interactive. Conduct a Current State Analysis to determine how (much) you need to get involved. Conclusions: CC: blmurch - http://www.flickr.com/photos/blmurch/2193301140/
  58. 62. HOW to get involved | Step 1: listen in -> Subscribe to Google Alerts on your brand name, your product and service names, your top executives' names, your competition. -> Identify the online media which cover your industry, your brand and your competition. Subscribe to their RSS feeds. Visit them regularly. Read user comments. -> Read and identify bloggers who write about you and your industry. Subscribe to the RSS feeds of relevant blogs. Visit them to read comments. -> Search micro-blogging services such as Twitter to identify micro-bloggers of your industry. Follow them. Use notify.me and similar services to stay informed.
  59. 63. HOW to get involved | Step 2: amplify -> When you discover interesting conversations about your industry and your brand, start tagging them, e.g. on services like del.icio.us, digg.com, StumbleUpon, etc. -> Amplify interesting content by (re)tweeting on Twitter and posting on various social web services e.g. through Ping.fm. -> When you are ready to participate in the discussions themselves, start by commenting on other people's articles and blog posts. Use your real name and be authentic. -> When you are comfortable with your own tone, you can initiate your own presence or publication, e.g. a blog.
  60. 64. HOW to get involved | Step 3: influence -> Once you have set up your own channel(s), again, start by amplifying: link with short comments to places elsewhere, where people are saying interesting things about your brand and industry. -> You can initiate your own posts, with more original viewpoints, when you feel ready. But remember to keep linking: as Dan Gillmor says: when you send people away to something interesting, they tend to come back for more. -> Use your social media channels to give your brand a human face: converse with people, show people, run videos and podcasts. -> Eventually, you can initiate new discussion topics and even break news relating to your own brand. But you have to be ready to answer curious as well as critical questions from your readers.
  61. 66. Seth Godin: Nobody cares about you! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N52OIcwynws
  62. 67. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T0ImibHwYqU Seth Godin: Nobody cares about you!
  63. 69. The hot potato: ROI How to measure Return on Investment of your Social Media efforts?
  64. 70. The hot potato: ROI
  65. 71. The hot potato: ROI
  66. 72. The hot potato: ROI
  67. 73. The hot potato: ROI
  68. 74. The hot potato: ROI
  69. 75. Example: Zappos (via Loic le Meur) http://www.loiclemeur.com/english/2010/04/zappos-streaming-all-hands-internal-meetings-whats-the-limit-of-opening-your-company.html
  70. 76. Jos Schuurmans Founder & CEO Cluetail Ltd. Mikkeli, Finland www.cluetail.com +358 50 59 33 006 [email_address] www.josschuurmans.com twitter.com/joschuurmans Q&A Let's have a conversation!
  71. 77. http://www.cluetail.com Long Tail recommendation technology Connecting people to content Connecting people to people

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