World Missionary
Conferences
Joshva
Places and Years
►Edinburgh (1910), Jerusalem (1928),
Madras (1938), Whitby (1947), Willingen
(1952), Ghana (1958), Mexico...
Five Major Themes Discussed
►Church and Mission,
►Mission and Unity,
►World, Mission and Church,
►The Kingdom of God and M...
Issues step by Step in missions
►Separation of Church and Mission
►Ecumenical Results of the Mission
Edinburgh 1910
► "the evangelization of the world in this
generation",
► Of the 1400 participants, 17 came from the "third...
► Edinburgh gave birth to the International Review
of Missions (whose first issue was published in
1912) and to a Continua...
Evangelising the non-Christian
►In discussing the Christian message to non-
Christian religions, the Edinburgh
conference ...
Edinburgh was a conference of mission
societies not of the church. However, as
Andrew Walls suggests “during its course th...
► Vedanayagam S. Azariah4 (1874-1945):
“Through all the ages to come the
► Indian church will rise up in gratitude to atte...
4.9.2. K. Ibuka: Note the development of an
indigenous confession which addresses
the context of Japan, rather than the si...
Andrew Walls Why Edinburgh is
important
►It differed in composition from the previous
conferences: it proportionally repre...
IMC constituted
► Function:
► 6.4.1. To stimulate thinking and investigation on
missionary questions
► 6.4.2. To make the ...
Jerusalem 1928
►At the Jerusalem conference, two major
questions on mission emerged to which no
real consensus was found: ...
►The first world war provoked by "Christian"
countries had profoundly challenged the
ideal of the Western civilization as ...
Church to church relationship
► The discussion at Jerusalem centred around the
relationship of such councils or missions t...
► The discussion of the Christian message in
Jerusalem centered on two major issues. First was
the antithesis between thos...
Three Selfs
►According to Henry Venn, Secretary of the
Church Missionary Society in the nineteenth
century, the missionary...
Barth and theologians
► In 1918 Karl Barth published his Commentary on
the Epistle to the Romans. He pointed out mission
a...
Tambaram 1938
►The third mission conference (the second
so-called "enlarged meeting" of the IMC)
took place in 1938 in Tam...
► Representatives from the so-called "younger"
churches were in the majority in Tambaram.
Tambaram also defended the ultim...
► It is the Church and the Church alone which can
carry the responsibility of transmitting the Gospel
from one generation ...
► For Henry Kramer, God‟s revelation in Jesus Christ
as recorded in the Bible is the fundamental
starting point and criter...
► Findings -We do not think that God has left
Himself without witness in the world at any time.
Men have been seeking Him ...
Whitby 1947
►The 1947 IMC conference in Whitby,
Canada, was a small one. It reflected on the
fundamental changes in what w...
►The task of world evangelism starts today
from the vantage ground of a Church which,
as never before, is really world wid...
►Whitby became famous for its slogan,
"partnership in obedience". The term
"partnership" had been used earlier, but it
rec...
Willingen 1952
► Mission is the purpose and action of the triune
God. Willingen is rightly considered to have had
the most...
Hoekendijk
► To say that „the Church is the starting-point and
the goal of Mission‟ is after all only making a
phenomenolo...
► The Missionary movement of which we are a part
has its source in the Triune God Himself. Out of
the depths of His love f...
► The next enlarged meeting of the IMC was in
Willingen, Germany, in 1952. Under the threat
of events in China to the trad...
Achimota 1958
► In 1958, the IMC met in Achimota near Accra,
Ghana, and debated a proposal to unite with the
World Council...
New Delhi 1961
► In 1961, the "integration" of church and
mission - in practice of the IMC with the WCC -
became effective...
► From then on, the world mission conferences
could really be called "ecumenical" because of
the much larger denominationa...
Mexico-city 1963
► In 1963, the first CWME met in Mexico-City
under the theme of "mission in six continents".
The perspect...
Catholic documents -1965
► AD GENTES - Decree on the Mission Activity
of the Church - Second Vatican Council
► Ad Gentes i...
Ad Gentes
► Ad Gentes focused on the factors involved in
mission work. It called for the continued
development of missiona...
Lumen Gentium 1964
► Lumen Gentium, the Dogmatic Constitution
on the Church, is one of the principal documents
of the Vati...
Nostra Aetate 1965
►Nostra Aetate is the Declaration on the
Relation of the Church with Non-
Christian Religions of the Se...
WCC‟s The church for others 1967
► The Church exists for the world. It is called to the
service of mankind. this is not an...
WCC‟s statement
► The Church is part of the world where God‟s
concern is recognized and celebrated. The Church
must be und...
Geneva 1966
► As Christians we are committed to working for the
transformation of society. In the past, we have
usually do...
WCC 1969 UPPSALA
► Since Christ lived, died and rose again for all
mankind, catholicity is the opposite of all kinds of
eg...
►The report also speaks of dialogue with
people of other faiths. In dialogue we share
our common humanity, its dignity and...
Dialogue
► The meeting with men of other faiths or of no
faith must lead to dialogues. A Christian‟s dialogue
with another...
On Dialogue
►Dialogue and proclamation are not the
same. The one compliments the other in a
total witness. But sometimes C...
WCC Bangkok 1972
► To the world he comes as the Lord of the
universe, with deep compassion for the poor and
the hungry, to...
Bangkok 1972/73
►The world mission conference of Bangkok,
at the turn of 1972/1973, became famous
for its holistic approac...
► The delegates struggled with situations of
exploitation and injustice expressed also in relations
between churches. In o...
►World Congress on Evangelism (Berlin
1966)
►Asia-South Pacific Congress on
Evangelism (Singapore 1968)
► North American C...
Wheaton Berlin 1966 Evangelical
groups
► And we remain convinced that, whatever the
social implications of the Gospel, our...
Evangelicals on 1966 On Ecumenism
►Today many voices call for organizational
Church union at the expense of doctrine
and p...
McGrvran
► If salvation today means political liberation, land
distribution, better pay for factory workers, the
downfall ...
Lausanne Covenant 1974
Evangelical groups
►The Lausanne Covenant is a declaration
agreed upon by more than 2,300
evangelic...
Nairobi Assembly WCC 1975
► The question was asked whether we can posit that
Jesus Christ is at work among people of other...
► We affirm that God is both the creator and the
judge of all men. We therefore should share his
concern for justice and r...
Gaudium et Spes 1975
► Gaudium et Spes, the Pastoral Constitution
on the Church in the Modern World, was one
of the chief ...
Evangelii Nuntiandi 1975
► The Apostoli letter Evangelii Nuntiandi of Pope
Paul VI. treats the Evangelisierung of the worl...
Evangelii…
► In the locking sieved chapter it concerns the spirit
of the Evangelisierung. It is to happen in Kraft of
the ...
Melbourne 1980
► The next CWME took place in Melbourne,
Australia, in 1980. Reflecting on the theme "Your
kingdom come", t...
► Other aspects of Melbourne however also deserve
recognition. There was ground-breaking work
done on evangelism and on th...
„Your Kingdom Come‟
►1. "Good News to the Poor",
►2. "The Kingdom of God and Human
Struggles",
►3. "The Church Witnesses t...
Kasemann in Melbourne
► Kasemann: Jesus will abolish every kind of
domination, authority and power and He is
destined to r...
CWME statements
Evangelical groups
► International Congress for World Evangelization
(Lausanne 1974)
► Kenya Congress on Unreached Peoples...
►Consultation on Gospel and Culture
(Willowbank 1978) Asia Lausanne Conference
on Evangelism - ALCOE I (Singapore
1978) Co...
The Consultation on World Evangelization (COWE)
Pattaya, Thailand (June 16-27, 1980)
Evangelical groups
►Held June 16-27 i...
► "to seek fresh vision and power for the task
Christ has given to his church until he comes;
► to assess the state of wor...
Sollicitudo 1987
►Sollicitudo Rei Socialis is an encyclical
written by Pope John Paul II on 30
December 1987. Sollicitudo ...
Manila Manifesto 1989
Evangelical groups
►Fifteen years later in July 1989, the more
than 3,000 participants in the Second...
Manila Manifesto
►Evangelism is primary because our chief
concern is with the gospel, that all people
may have the opportu...
San Antonio 1989
►The 1989 world mission conference of San
Antonio, Texas, USA can be considered the
last in the period do...
► San Antonio became famous for a consensus
statement on the relation between Christianity and
other religions. This quest...
Your Will be Done: Mission in Christ‟s
Way
►1. Turning to the Living God;
►2. Participating in Suffering and Struggle;
►3....
Redemptoris Missio
►Redemptoris Missio (Latin for Mission of
the Redeemer), subtitled On the
permanent validity of the Chu...
Canberra Assembly 1991
► As the Assembly discussed the process of listening
to the spirit at work in every culture, we cau...
Salvador de Bahia 1996
►The last, 1996, WCC conference on mission
of the century took place in Salvador de
Bahía, Brazil, ...
Mission statement
►We affirm that the spirit poured out on the
day of Pentecost makes all cultures worthy
vehicles of the ...
► Reaffirming Bangkok‟s position on inculturation,
Salvador insisted on the richness of cultural variety
as God‟s gift, bu...
4 world missionary conferences
4 world missionary conferences
4 world missionary conferences
4 world missionary conferences
4 world missionary conferences
4 world missionary conferences
4 world missionary conferences
4 world missionary conferences
4 world missionary conferences
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4 world missionary conferences

  1. 1. World Missionary Conferences Joshva
  2. 2. Places and Years ►Edinburgh (1910), Jerusalem (1928), Madras (1938), Whitby (1947), Willingen (1952), Ghana (1958), Mexico (1963), Bangkok (1972), Melbourne (1980), San Antonio (1989), and Salvador (1996). The World Council of Churches assemblies were: Amsterdam (1948), Evanston (1954), New Delhi (1961), Uppsala (1968), Nairobi (1975), Vancouver (1983), Canberra (1991) and Harare (1998).
  3. 3. Five Major Themes Discussed ►Church and Mission, ►Mission and Unity, ►World, Mission and Church, ►The Kingdom of God and Mission, ►Mission and The World of Religions and Cultures.
  4. 4. Issues step by Step in missions ►Separation of Church and Mission ►Ecumenical Results of the Mission
  5. 5. Edinburgh 1910 ► "the evangelization of the world in this generation", ► Of the 1400 participants, 17 came from the "third world". Edinburgh was very carefully prepared in thematic commissions and, despite quite "progressive" debates in some of these, the conference generally reflected a traditional conservative approach to mission, linking the proclamation of the "gospel to the heathens" with the spread of Western civilization.
  6. 6. ► Edinburgh gave birth to the International Review of Missions (whose first issue was published in 1912) and to a Continuation Committee which laid the foundations for the creation of the International Missionary Council (IMC) in 1921. ► There had been earlier major mission conferences, but at Edinburgh, steps were taken towards a certain institutionalization of cooperation between Protestant mission councils. Edinburgh can not be considered "ecumenical" in the present sense of the word however, since there were no Catholic or Orthodox delegates present. Of the 1400 participants, 17 came from the "third world".
  7. 7. Evangelising the non-Christian ►In discussing the Christian message to non- Christian religions, the Edinburgh conference was not concerned with working out a relationship between Christianity and other religions and cultures, but rather how to win the non-Christians to Christ.
  8. 8. Edinburgh was a conference of mission societies not of the church. However, as Andrew Walls suggests “during its course the missions became almost a surrogate church. Delegates were experiencing a sense of common purpose that they recognized as belonging to the nature of the church, or as a foretaste of what the church could be.” Walls, Andrew F. The Cross-Cultural Process in Christian History: Studies in the Transmission and Appropriation of Faith. Maryknoll, N.Y.: Orbis Books, 2002: 58.
  9. 9. ► Vedanayagam S. Azariah4 (1874-1945): “Through all the ages to come the ► Indian church will rise up in gratitude to attest the heroism and self-denying ► labours of the missionary body. You have given your goods to feed the poor. You ► have given your bodies to be burned. We also ask for love. Give us FRIENDS!” ► "The Problem of Co-Operation Between Foreign and Native Workers,” World ► Missionary Conference, 1910; The History and Records of the Conference Together ► with Addresses Delivered at the Evening Meetings, (vol. 9), (Edinburgh & London: ► Oliphant, Anderson, & Ferrier, 1910): 315.
  10. 10. 4.9.2. K. Ibuka: Note the development of an indigenous confession which addresses the context of Japan, rather than the simple transplantation of the Apostles Creed. “The Problem of Co-Operation Between Foreign and Native Workers,” World Missionary Conference, 1910: 294-305. 4.9.3. John R. Mott: “The end of the Conference is the beginning of the conquest. The end of the planning is the beginning of the doing.” “Closing Address,” World Missionary Conference, 1910: 347. 4.9.4. Mott: Edinburgh was “the first attempt at a systematic and careful study of the missionary problems of the world.”
  11. 11. Andrew Walls Why Edinburgh is important ►It differed in composition from the previous conferences: it proportionally represented the sending countries. Small non-western representation ►ii. It was a consultation not intended to advertise missionary activity or educate non-missionaries
  12. 12. IMC constituted ► Function: ► 6.4.1. To stimulate thinking and investigation on missionary questions ► 6.4.2. To make the results available for all missionary societies and missions ► 6.4.3. To help co-ordinate the activities of the national missionary organizations of the different countries and of the societies they represent ► 6.4.4. To bring about Christian public opinion in support of freedom of conscience and religion and of missionary liberty ► 6.4.5. To help unite the Christian forces of the world in seeking justice in international and inter-racial relations ► 6.4.6. To be responsible for the publication of the International Review of Missions and such other publications as in the judgment of the Council may contribute to the study of Missionary questions ► 6.4.7. To call a world missionary conference if and when this should be deemed desirable.5
  13. 13. Jerusalem 1928 ►At the Jerusalem conference, two major questions on mission emerged to which no real consensus was found: the relation between the Christian message and other religions, and the theological interpretation of Christian social and political involvement. ► The communist revolution of 1918 had made the dream of evangelizing the whole world within one generation unrealistic.
  14. 14. ►The first world war provoked by "Christian" countries had profoundly challenged the ideal of the Western civilization as an embodiment of the gospel.
  15. 15. Church to church relationship ► The discussion at Jerusalem centred around the relationship of such councils or missions to the „home‟ church on the one hand and to the indigenous (younger) churches on the other. The dealings of the missionary societies with the indigenous churches were through these missions or councils. At Jerusalem, the younger churches desired a direct link between them and the societies and the churches they represented. They desired a church to church relationship.
  16. 16. ► The discussion of the Christian message in Jerusalem centered on two major issues. First was the antithesis between those on the one hand (mainly Continentals) who wanted to stress the absolute uniqueness of the Gospel revealed in Jesus Christ, and those on the other hand (some of the Anglo-American) who had been influenced by the comparative study of religions and did not want to overlook the religious values in the non- Christian religions. ► The other issue had to do with the difference of opinion over the social responsibility and concern of the church in the world. These differences reflected the outlook of the delegates on the motives, purpose, and goals of mission. In such a situation the drafting of the message of the Assembly was not easy.
  17. 17. Three Selfs ►According to Henry Venn, Secretary of the Church Missionary Society in the nineteenth century, the missionary aim should be to help the Christian communities in the mission field to grow into self-supporting, self-propagating and self-governing churches. At the end of the process, the mission passes into a settled Christian community.
  18. 18. Barth and theologians ► In 1918 Karl Barth published his Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans. He pointed out mission as an activity of God (1932[1957]). As liberalism had reflected the optimism and humanism of the 19th century, so neo-orthodoxy23, to no small degree, arose from the pessimism and the despair begotten of the terrors of World War I. It emphasised human sinfulness and the inability, unaided, to discover God or to extricate oneself from the horrors brought by one‟s depravity.
  19. 19. Tambaram 1938 ►The third mission conference (the second so-called "enlarged meeting" of the IMC) took place in 1938 in Tambaram, near Madras, India. In a world context where peace was increasingly threatened by fascist-type regimes (Germany, Italy, Portugal, Spain, Japan), the discussions focused on the importance and centrality of the church (in particular the local church) in mission.
  20. 20. ► Representatives from the so-called "younger" churches were in the majority in Tambaram. Tambaram also defended the ultimate truth of the Christian message vis-à-vis other religions, while advising missionaries to a listening and dialoguing approach in practice.
  21. 21. ► It is the Church and the Church alone which can carry the responsibility of transmitting the Gospel from one generation to another, of preserving its purity and of proclaiming it to all creatures. ► It is the Church and Church alone which can witness to the reality that man belongs to God in Christ with a higher right than that of any earthly institution which may claim his supreme allegiance. It is within the Church and the Church alone that the fellowship of God‟s people receive together the gifts He offers to His children in Word and Sacrament.
  22. 22. ► For Henry Kramer, God‟s revelation in Jesus Christ as recorded in the Bible is the fundamental starting point and criterion of all Christian and theological thinking. It is from this stand point Kramer speaks about the Christian attitude towards the non-Christian religions. ► For a Christian "the only standard of reference can be the new and unmeasurable world which has been revealed and made real by God in Jesus Christ and His life and work, and which is accessible to faith alone ... Christ, as the ultimate standard of reference, is the crisis of all religions, of the non-Christian religions and of empirical Christianity. This implies that the most fruitful and legitimate way to analyze and evaluate all religions is to investigate them in the light of the revelation of Christ".
  23. 23. ► Findings -We do not think that God has left Himself without witness in the world at any time. Men have been seeking Him all through the ages. Often this seeking and longing has been misunderstood. But we see glimpses of God‟s light in the world of religions, showing that His yearning after His erring children has not been without response. ► Yet we believe that all religious insights and religious experiences have to be fully tested before God in Christ; and we see that this is true as well within as outside the Christian Church. Christ is revolutionary; He brings conversion and regeneration when we meet Him, from whatever point we may have started.87
  24. 24. Whitby 1947 ►The 1947 IMC conference in Whitby, Canada, was a small one. It reflected on the fundamental changes in what was considered a "revolutionary" world after the shock of the second world war. There was a need to rebuild not only countries, but also relations between people who had been in conflict.
  25. 25. ►The task of world evangelism starts today from the vantage ground of a Church which, as never before, is really world wide.... It is working itself out today in a real partnership between the older and younger churches. The sense both of a common faith in Christ, and of a common responsibility for an immense and unfinished task, have brought us out of the mists of tension and re- adjustment to a higher level, from which we have been able to see our world task in a new perspective.
  26. 26. ►Whitby became famous for its slogan, "partnership in obedience". The term "partnership" had been used earlier, but it received particular emphasis at Whitby. Delegates abandoned the use of the language of "Christian" and "non Christian" countries, opening the way to new paths in mission theology. They also insisted on the importance of good relationships with the new World Council of Churches, which was to hold its first assembly in 1948.
  27. 27. Willingen 1952 ► Mission is the purpose and action of the triune God. Willingen is rightly considered to have had the most lasting influence on ecumenical mission theology. Indeed, the idea of missio Dei,that was taken up in the follow-up of Willingen, proved to be most creative. The strong emphasis on the centrality of the church in mission (important since Tambaram) was replaced by an enlarged perspective that allowed an interpretation of world events as determining factors for mission.
  28. 28. Hoekendijk ► To say that „the Church is the starting-point and the goal of Mission‟ is after all only making a phenomenological statement. It may well be that we are so wrapped up in our church-centrism that we hardly realise any longer how much our ideas are open to controversy. Would it not be a good thing to start all over again in trying to understand what it really means when we repeat, again and again, our favourite missionary text, „the Gospel of the Kingdom will be proclaimed throughout the Oikoumene - and attempts to re-think our ecclesiology within this frame work of the kingdom -gospel-Apostolate-world?
  29. 29. ► The Missionary movement of which we are a part has its source in the Triune God Himself. Out of the depths of His love for us, the Father has sent forth His own beloved Son to reconcile all things to Himself. that we and all men might, through the Spirit, be made one in Him with the Father in that perfect love which is the very nature of God.... We who have been chosen in Christ, reconciled to God through Him, made members of His Body, sharers in His Spirit, and heirs through hope of His Kingdom, are by these very facts committed to full participation in His redeeming mission.
  30. 30. ► The next enlarged meeting of the IMC was in Willingen, Germany, in 1952. Under the threat of events in China to the traditional mission enterprise, delegates rediscovered that mission depends first and foremost on God‟s own activity.
  31. 31. Achimota 1958 ► In 1958, the IMC met in Achimota near Accra, Ghana, and debated a proposal to unite with the World Council of Churches, with which it shared several programmes and enertained intensive relations. The proposal was accepted by a great majority, while certain theologically more conservative mission councils refused to integrate mission and church. They wanted to preserve missionary freedom, and not become dependant on ecclesiastical authorities and agendas.
  32. 32. New Delhi 1961 ► In 1961, the "integration" of church and mission - in practice of the IMC with the WCC - became effective at the assemblies of New Delhi. ► The mission councils affiliated to the IMC became affiliated to the Commission on World Mission and Evangelism of the WCC (CWME, later called Conference). The Division on World Mission and Evangelism (DWME, later, Commission) took over the programmatic work and responsibility of the IMC, which ceased to exist.
  33. 33. ► From then on, the world mission conferences could really be called "ecumenical" because of the much larger denominational participation, including Orthodox churches and, soon after Vatican II, also Roman Catholic observers.
  34. 34. Mexico-city 1963 ► In 1963, the first CWME met in Mexico-City under the theme of "mission in six continents". The perspective of mission was enlarged to encompass all continents, and not only those of the "south". Meeting during the first development decade, the conference dealt intensively with witness in a world where God was active, inviting the churches to join in missio Dei. It was the time of a psoitive appreciation of secularization and of non-religious formulations of Christian faith and action, in particular in the West.
  35. 35. Catholic documents -1965 ► AD GENTES - Decree on the Mission Activity of the Church - Second Vatican Council ► Ad Gentes is the Second Vatican Council's Decree on the Missionary Activity of the Church. Passed by the assembled bishops by a vote of 2,394 to 5, it was promulgated by Pope Paul VI on November 18, 1965. The title is Latin for "To the Nations," and is from the first line of the decree, as is customary with Roman Catholic documents.
  36. 36. Ad Gentes ► Ad Gentes focused on the factors involved in mission work. It called for the continued development of missionary acculturation. It encourages missionaries to live with the people they are attempting to convert, to absorb their ways and culture. It encourages the coordination of mission work through agencies and the cooperation with other groups and organizations within the Catholic Church and other denominations.
  37. 37. Lumen Gentium 1964 ► Lumen Gentium, the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, is one of the principal documents of the Vatican II. The Constitution was promulgated by Pope Paul VI on November 21, 1964, following approval by the assembled bishops by a vote of 2,151 to 5. (The full text in English is available through the Holy See's website.) ► As is customary with significant Roman Catholic Church documents, it is known by its first words, "Lumen Gentium", Latin for "Light of the Nations".
  38. 38. Nostra Aetate 1965 ►Nostra Aetate is the Declaration on the Relation of the Church with Non- Christian Religions of the Second Vatican Council. Passed by a vote of 2,221 to 88 of the assembled bishops, this declaration was promulgated on October 28, 1965, by Pope Paul VI. The title means "In our Time" in Latin and is from the first line of the declaration as is customary with Roman Catholic documents.
  39. 39. WCC‟s The church for others 1967 ► The Church exists for the world. It is called to the service of mankind. this is not an election to privilege but to serving engagement. The Church lives in order that the world may know its true being. It is pars pro toto, it is the first fruits of the new creation. But its center lies outside itself; it must live ex-centrally. It must seek out those institutions in the world that call for living responsibly and there it must announce and point to shalom, this ex-centric position of the Church implies that we must stop thinking front the inside towards the outside.
  40. 40. WCC‟s statement ► The Church is part of the world where God‟s concern is recognized and celebrated. The Church must be understood in its world-relation as an expression of God‟s will that all men be saved (1 Tim. 2:3). This affirms its existence for all men (pro-existence). In terms of God‟s concern for the world, the Church is a segment of the World, a postscript, that is, added to the world for the purpose of pointing to and celebrating both Christ‟s presence and God‟s ultimate redemption of the whole world.
  41. 41. Geneva 1966 ► As Christians we are committed to working for the transformation of society. In the past, we have usually done this through quiet efforts at social renewal, working in and through established institutions according to their rules. Today, a significant number of those who are dedicated to the service of Christ and their neighbor assume a more radical or revolutionary position. They do not deny the value of tradition or social order, but they are searching for a new strategy by which to bring about basic changes in society without too much delay.
  42. 42. WCC 1969 UPPSALA ► Since Christ lived, died and rose again for all mankind, catholicity is the opposite of all kinds of egoism and particularism. It is the quality by which the Church expresses the fullness, the integrity and the totality of life in Christ. The Church is Catholic, and should be catholic in all her elements and in all aspects of her life, especially in her worship. Members of the Church should reflect the integrity and wholeness which is the essential character of the Church.
  43. 43. ►The report also speaks of dialogue with people of other faiths. In dialogue we share our common humanity, its dignity and fallen-ness, and express our common concern for that humanity. It opens the possibility of sharing in new forms of community and common service. Each meets and challenges the other; witnessing from the depth of his existence to the ultimate concerns that come to expressions in word and deed.
  44. 44. Dialogue ► The meeting with men of other faiths or of no faith must lead to dialogues. A Christian‟s dialogue with another implies neither a denial of the uniqueness of Christ, nor any loss of his own commitment to Christ, but rather that a genuinely Christian approach to others must be human, personal, relevant and humble. In dialogue we share our common humanity, its dignity and fallenness, and express our common concern for that humanity. It opens the possibility of sharing in new forms of community and common service.
  45. 45. On Dialogue ►Dialogue and proclamation are not the same. The one compliments the other in a total witness. But sometimes Christians are not able to engage either in open dialogue or proclamation. Witness is then a silent one of living the Christian life and suffering for Christ.
  46. 46. WCC Bangkok 1972 ► To the world he comes as the Lord of the universe, with deep compassion for the poor and the hungry, to liberate the powerless and the, oppressed. To the powerful and the oppressors he comes in judgement and mercy. ► Without the liberation of Churches and Christians from their complicity with structural injustice and violence, there can be no liberating Church for mankind. We seek the Church which initiates actions for liberation and support the work of other liberating groups without calculating self- interest.
  47. 47. Bangkok 1972/73 ►The world mission conference of Bangkok, at the turn of 1972/1973, became famous for its holistic approach to the theme "Salvation Today", encompassing its spiritual as well as socio-political aspects, without favouring one over the other. Bangkok acknowledged the need for contextual theologies and recognition of cultural identity as shaping the voice of those answering and following Christ.
  48. 48. ► The delegates struggled with situations of exploitation and injustice expressed also in relations between churches. In order to enable local churches in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific to set their own priorities in witness, a temporary "moratorium" on sending money and missionaries from the North was proposed. An alternative proposal for more justice in mission relations was seen in the transformation of the Paris mission society into a community of churches in mission (called CEVAA).
  49. 49. ►World Congress on Evangelism (Berlin 1966) ►Asia-South Pacific Congress on Evangelism (Singapore 1968) ► North American Congress on Evangelism (Minneapolis 1969) ►Latin America Congress on Evangelism (Bogota 1969) ► European Congress on Evangelism (Amsterdam 1971) Evangelical Groups Consultations
  50. 50. Wheaton Berlin 1966 Evangelical groups ► And we remain convinced that, whatever the social implications of the Gospel, our primary task is to take this redeeming message of personal salvation to every creature, and to use every legitimate means for the evangelization of the world in our generation. ► We may occasionally err in making our charges of neo-universalism and syncretism against individuals and organizations. We ourselves may sometimes fail to present the Gospel in its biblical fullness.
  51. 51. Evangelicals on 1966 On Ecumenism ►Today many voices call for organizational Church union at the expense of doctrine and practice (faith and order). Denominational divisions are seen as the great scandal of our day. Union becomes a major objective. However, organizational Church union of itself has seldom released a fresh missionary dynamism, or upsurge of missionary recruitment.
  52. 52. McGrvran ► If salvation today means political liberation, land distribution, better pay for factory workers, the downfall of the oppressive systems of government, and the like, then the whole apparatus of missions is rightly used to achieve these ends. Evangelism will be downgraded. Churching the unchurched will be neglected and ridiculed. The airplane of missions will be directed away from the propagation of the Gospel to the establishment of utopias.
  53. 53. Lausanne Covenant 1974 Evangelical groups ►The Lausanne Covenant is a declaration agreed upon by more than 2,300 evangelicals during the 1974 International Congress to be more intentional about world evangelization. Since then, the Covenant has challenged churches and Christian organizations to work together to make Jesus Christ known throughout the world.
  54. 54. Nairobi Assembly WCC 1975 ► The question was asked whether we can posit that Jesus Christ is at work among people of other faiths. Here opinions differed. Some stated as their conviction that Jesus Christ as Savior is not present in the other religions, although they accepted the idea of a natural knowledge of God. Others acknowledged the presence of the logoi spermatikoi (scattered seeds of truth) in other religions but stressed that only in Jesus Christ do we receive fullness of truth and life. Others gave first hand testimony that their own faith in Jesus Christ had been greatly deepened and strengthened through encountering him in dialogue with those of other faiths. The point was also made that the spirit works among people outside Israel and outside the Church, and that this spirit is one with the Father and the Son.
  55. 55. ► We affirm that God is both the creator and the judge of all men. We therefore should share his concern for justice and reconciliation throughout human society and for the liberation of men from every kind of oppression. Because mankind is made in the image of God, every person, regardless of race, religion, color, culture, class, sex or age has an intrinsic dignity because of which he should be respected and served, not exploited. Here too we express penitence both for our neglect and for having sometimes regarded evangelism and social concern as mutually exclusive.
  56. 56. Gaudium et Spes 1975 ► Gaudium et Spes, the Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World, was one of the chief accomplishments of the Second Vatican Council. Approved by a vote of 2,307 to 75 of the bishops assembled at the council, and was promulgated by Pope Paul VI on December 8, 1965, the day the council ended. As is customary with Catholic documents, the title is from the first sentence and means "Joy and Hope" in Latin.
  57. 57. Evangelii Nuntiandi 1975 ► The Apostoli letter Evangelii Nuntiandi of Pope Paul VI. treats the Evangelisierung of the world today and comes from 8 December 1975. ► In the first six chapters it describes Christ as author of the Evangelisierung, the church and their representative as carrier of the Evangelisierung, beyond that their contents, ways, methods and addressee, the listeners of the glad message.
  58. 58. Evangelii… ► In the locking sieved chapter it concerns the spirit of the Evangelisierung. It is to happen in Kraft of the holy spirit, happen authentically and aim at the unit in the faith. The truth obligated and by the love inspired it is to have respect „before the religious and religious situation of humans, who one evangelisiert. Respect for their own life rhythm, which one may not load over fee. Respect for their conscience and their convictions, one not to snub is “(EN 79).
  59. 59. Melbourne 1980 ► The next CWME took place in Melbourne, Australia, in 1980. Reflecting on the theme "Your kingdom come", the conference insisted on the particular role of the poor and churches of the poor in God‟s mission. Influenced by the Latin American liberation theologies, the delegates highlighted the radical aspects of the kingdom message, and the serious challenge it threw to traditional missiology and mission programmes.
  60. 60. ► Other aspects of Melbourne however also deserve recognition. There was ground-breaking work done on evangelism and on the church as healing community in the section dealing with the church‟s witness. The conference also highlighted how Christ‟s choice of vulnerability and way to the cross challenges the use of power, in political, church and mission life. ► Many of Melbourne‟s insights are to be found in the document Mission and Evangelism - An Ecumenical Affirmationadopted in 1982, which remains the fundamental text on mission for the WCC.
  61. 61. „Your Kingdom Come‟ ►1. "Good News to the Poor", ►2. "The Kingdom of God and Human Struggles", ►3. "The Church Witnesses to the Kingdom", and ►4. "Christ - Crucified and Risen - Challenges Human Power".
  62. 62. Kasemann in Melbourne ► Kasemann: Jesus will abolish every kind of domination, authority and power and He is destined to reign until God has put all enemies under His feet. ► For us the Kingdom of God is not primarily theory but praxis. Nor is it a praxis concerned mainly with changed conditions, new possibilities and goals. From the New Testament, the Christian standpoint, the kingdom of God denotes that praxis in which Jesus of Nazareth is our Lord and Saviour of the world"
  63. 63. CWME statements
  64. 64. Evangelical groups ► International Congress for World Evangelization (Lausanne 1974) ► Kenya Congress on Unreached Peoples (Lenana 1975) ► Nigerian Congress on World Evangelization (Nigeria 1975) ► Chinese Congress on World Evangelization (Hong Kong 1976) ► Consultation on the Homogeneous Unit Principle (Pasadena 1977) ► All India Congress on Mission and Evangelization (Devali 1977) ► Ghana Congress on Evangelization (Accra 1977) ► Second Nigerian Congress on World Evangelization (Nigeria 1978)
  65. 65. ►Consultation on Gospel and Culture (Willowbank 1978) Asia Lausanne Conference on Evangelism - ALCOE I (Singapore 1978) Congress on Evangelization for Malaysia and Singapore (1978) Norwegian Congress on World Evangelization (Norway 1978) North American Conference on Muslim Evangelization (Glen Eyrie 1978) Venezuelan National Congress on Evangelization (Caracas 1979) International Consultation on Simple Lifestyle (Hoddesdon 1980) Stuttgart Congress on Evangelization (Stuttgart 1980) Indian Congress on Evangelization (Guatemala 1980)
  66. 66. The Consultation on World Evangelization (COWE) Pattaya, Thailand (June 16-27, 1980) Evangelical groups ►Held June 16-27 in Pattaya, Thailand, this Lausanne Committee on World Evangelization sponsored consultation gathered almost nine hundred people from around the world to consider strategic issues of reaching the unreached. ►Thailand statement
  67. 67. ► "to seek fresh vision and power for the task Christ has given to his church until he comes; ► to assess the state of world evangelization, its progress and hindrances; ► to complete an extended study program on theological and strategic issues related to world evangelization and to share the results; ► to develop specific evangelistic strategies related to different unreached people groups; and ► to review the mandate of the LCWE" (Scott, 1981, 60-61).
  68. 68. Sollicitudo 1987 ►Sollicitudo Rei Socialis is an encyclical written by Pope John Paul II on 30 December 1987. Sollicitudo Rei Socialis was written in regard to 'Social Concern' for the 20th anniversary of 'Populorum Progressio'.
  69. 69. Manila Manifesto 1989 Evangelical groups ►Fifteen years later in July 1989, the more than 3,000 participants in the Second International Congress on World Evangelization (Lausanne II) in Manila, Philippines produced another important document: The Manila Manifesto.
  70. 70. Manila Manifesto ►Evangelism is primary because our chief concern is with the gospel, that all people may have the opportunity to accept Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.
  71. 71. San Antonio 1989 ►The 1989 world mission conference of San Antonio, Texas, USA can be considered the last in the period dominated by the conflict between two ideological and economic systems (1918-1989). It followed on Melbourne with another of the Lord‟s prayer requests, "Your will be done", to which was added "mission in Christ‟s way", an expression taken from the 1982 Affirmation.
  72. 72. ► San Antonio became famous for a consensus statement on the relation between Christianity and other religions. This question has always been a disputed point at WCC mission conferences. The consensus found was, basically: "We cannot point to any other way of salvation than Jesus Christ; at the same time we cannot put any limit to God‟s saving power. ► There is a tension between these affirmations which we acknowledge and cannot resolve." As all other CWME conference had done, San Antonio also dealt with Christian involvement in struggles for life and against oppression, as well as with the increasing importance of our relations with creation.
  73. 73. Your Will be Done: Mission in Christ‟s Way ►1. Turning to the Living God; ►2. Participating in Suffering and Struggle; ►3. The Earth is the Lord‟s; and ►4. Towards Renewed Communities in Mission.
  74. 74. Redemptoris Missio ►Redemptoris Missio (Latin for Mission of the Redeemer), subtitled On the permanent validity of the Church's missionary mandate, is a Papal encyclical by Pope John Paul II published on December 7, 1990 devoted to the subject of "the urgency of missionary activity"[1] and in which he wished "to invite the Church to renew her missionary commitment."[2]
  75. 75. Canberra Assembly 1991 ► As the Assembly discussed the process of listening to the spirit at work in every culture, we caution with others, that discernment is required to identify the spirit as the spirit of Jesus Christ and thus develop criteria for and limits to theological diversity. We argued for a high Christology to serve as the only authentic Christian base for dialogue with persons of other living faiths... ► At present, there is insufficient clarity regarding the relationship between the confession of the Lord Jesus Christ as God and Savior according to the Scripture, the person and the work of the Holy Spirit, and legitimate concern which are part of the WCC agenda... This theological deficit not only conspires against the work of the WCC as a Christian witness but also increases the tensions among its member churches
  76. 76. Salvador de Bahia 1996 ►The last, 1996, WCC conference on mission of the century took place in Salvador de Bahía, Brazil, and was fully dedicated to the relation between gospel and cultures. After the change in world politics of 1989 and the increased influence of cultural and ethnic identities on violent conflicts, a renewed missiological reflection on culture was needed.
  77. 77. Mission statement ►We affirm that the spirit poured out on the day of Pentecost makes all cultures worthy vehicles of the love of God and that no culture is the exclusive norm for God‟s relationship with the humans. We also affirm dialogue as a vital mode of developing relationships, cultivating understanding and growing towards the unity to which all creation is called in Christ.
  78. 78. ► Reaffirming Bangkok‟s position on inculturation, Salvador insisted on the richness of cultural variety as God‟s gift, but also on the gospel imperative to link the affirmation of one‟s cultural identity with an openness to other identities. Salvador recognized the fundamental equality of all cultures, but also their ambiguity. In its relation with cultures, the gospel may be illuminated, but also obscured. ► Churches in mission may have to confirm elements of their culture, but also to challenge others. In the face of the situation in the Eastern part of Europe in particular, Salvador reaffirmed the WCC‟s opposition to proselytism, and the need for cooperation in mission and common witness

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