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Curriculum Development

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THE NATURE AND
SCOPE OF
CURRICULUM
DEVELOPMENT
(PHILIPPINE CONTEXT)
Definitions of Curriculum
• The sum of all learning content,
experience and resources that are
purposely selected, organized and
implemented by the school in pursuit of
its peculiar mandate as a distinct
institution of learning and human
development
From the Latin root currere, which means
to run; the course of the race
Definition(s) of Curriculum
• Curriculum – is a structured set of
learning outcomes or task that
educators usually call goals and
objectives. ( Howell and Evans 1995)
• Curriculum – is the “what” of teaching.
• Curriculum – listings of subjects to be
taught in school.
Definitions of Curriculum
• Some authors define curriculum as the
total effort of the school to bring about
desired outcomes in school and out-of-
school situations.
• It is also defined as a sequence of
potential experiences set up in school for
the purpose of disciplining children and
youth in group ways of thinking and
acting.
• A document which describes a
structured series of learning objectives
and outcomes for a given subject matter
area
• Includes a specification of what should
be learned, how it should be taught, and
the plan for implementing/assessing the
learning
Definition(s) of Curriculum
Curriculum Approaches
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Curriculumdevelopment

  • 1. THE NATURE AND SCOPE OF CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT (PHILIPPINE CONTEXT)
  • 2. Definitions of Curriculum • The sum of all learning content, experience and resources that are purposely selected, organized and implemented by the school in pursuit of its peculiar mandate as a distinct institution of learning and human development From the Latin root currere, which means to run; the course of the race
  • 3. Definition(s) of Curriculum • Curriculum – is a structured set of learning outcomes or task that educators usually call goals and objectives. ( Howell and Evans 1995) • Curriculum – is the “what” of teaching. • Curriculum – listings of subjects to be taught in school.
  • 4. Definitions of Curriculum • Some authors define curriculum as the total effort of the school to bring about desired outcomes in school and out-of- school situations. • It is also defined as a sequence of potential experiences set up in school for the purpose of disciplining children and youth in group ways of thinking and acting.
  • 5. • A document which describes a structured series of learning objectives and outcomes for a given subject matter area • Includes a specification of what should be learned, how it should be taught, and the plan for implementing/assessing the learning Definition(s) of Curriculum
  • 7. Curriculum Approaches 1. Technical – Scientific Approaches 2. Behavioral-Rational Approach 3. System-Managerial Approach 4. Intellectual –Academic Approach 5. Non-Technician / Non-Scientific 6. Humanistic – Aesthetic Approach 7. Re-conceptualist Approach 8. Reconstructionism 9. Eclectic Models
  • 8. Technical – Scientific Approach • The curriculum developers which may include specialists, superintendents, principals and coordinators are likened to engineers and architects who use instruments and empirical methods in preparing a blueprint with well defined elements orderly-sequenced procedures, and quality control measures to increase the probability of success in its implementation
  • 9. Bases of Technical Scientific Approach 1. The curriculum will improve as the professional competence of teachers improves. 2. The competence of teachers will improve when they participate in curriculum development 3. When teachers share in shaping the goals and selecting the content and method of instruction as well as evaluating results, their involvement is assured. 4. When people interact during face-to-face sessions, they will better understand one another.
  • 10. Behavioral-Rational Approach • It is a means-end approach. Curricula developed through this approach become the actual blueprints which prescribe the roles of key figures in the educative process. • Viewing the curriculum as the means and instruction as the end is a behavioral orientation.
  • 11. Systems-Managerial Approach 1. Motivate interest of all stakeholders 2. Encourage participation and involvement of all stakeholders 3. Synthesize divergent viewpoints 4. Monitor curriculum implementation 5. Create a climate of innovation and change
  • 12. Intellectual- Academic Approach • Emphasizes the importance of theories and principles in curriculum planning. • This model is influenced by the philosophy of John Dewey
  • 13. Non-Technical / Non-Scientific Approaches • Flexible and less structured without predetermined objectives to guide the learning-teaching process • Contends that not all ends of education can be known nor indeed to be known in all cases.
  • 14. Humanistic-Aesthetic Approach • Argues that those who favor the rational approach miss the artistic and personal aspects of curriculum and instruction. • It is rooted in progressive philosophy which promotes the liberation of learners from authoritarian teachers.
  • 15. Reconceptualist Approach • Criticizes the technocratic – scientific models as not sensitive to the inner feelings and experience of individuals. • Reflects on existentialist orientation. • The aim of education is not to control instruction in order to preserve existing order.
  • 16. Reconstructionism • The school is an institution of social reform. • Criticizes the progressivists for putting too much emphasis on the individual learner to the neglect of the needs of society.
  • 17. Eclectic Models • Oftentimes, Filipino educators, in particular, prefer eclectic models (halo-halo) which are a combination of several approaches, rather than commit themselves to one particular approach only. • Eclectic models are not mere patchwork (pagtagpi-tagpi) but a synthesis. (pagbuo o paghahabi) where desired features from several models are selected and integrated into a new whole.
  • 18. What is Curriculum Development? • It is defined as the process of selecting, organizing, executing, and evaluating learning experiences on the basis of the needs, abilities and interests of the learners and the nature of the society or community.
  • 19. Factors to consider • The nature of society; cultural heritage, the needs and the demands as well as the economic, social, political, cultural, moral and other problems of the people. • The interest , the needs, previous experiences and problems of the learners • The educational and psychological principles based on the findings of scientific studies and experimentation.
  • 20. What is Curriculum Planning? • A Curriculum Planning is the process whereby the arrangement of curriculum plans or learning opportunities are created. • A Curriculum guide is a written curriculum.
  • 21. Curriculum Planning • It is the process of preparing for the duties of teaching, deciding upon goals and emphases, determining curriculum content, selecting learning resources and classroom procedures, evaluating progress, and looking toward next steps.
  • 22. Criteria of a Good Curriculum 1. Continuously evolving 2. Based on the needs of the people 3. Democratically conceived 4. Result of long-term effort 5. Complex details 6. Logical sequence of subject matter 7. Complements and cooperates with community 8. Has educational quality 9. Has administrative flexibility
  • 23. Criteria for Selecting Curriculum Content 1. Self-sufficiency 2. Significance 3. Validity 4. Feasibility 5. Learnability 6. Interest 7. Utility
  • 24. Curriculum Innovation Innovation is often used to describe solutions to problems which represent a change or departure from current practice as opposed to progressive improvements within and existing framework (Klaus, 1969)
  • 25. Curriculum Innovation • Innovation is the introduction of something new and as a new idea, method, or device. (Merriam Websters Dictionary, 2010)
  • 26. Approaches to Curriculum Design The curriculum design models are implemented through the different approaches that are accepted by the teachers and curriculum practitioners. How the design is utilized becomes the approach to the curriculum.
  • 27.   this approach to curriculum design is based on the underlying philosophy that the child is the center of the educational process  curriculum is constructed based on the needs, interests, purposes and abilities of the learners  curriculum is also built upon the learner’s knowledge, skills, learning and potentials Child or Learner-Centered Approach
  • 28. This approach considers the following:  A new respect for the child is fundamental  A new freedom of action is provided  The whole activity is divided into units of work  The recognition of the need for using and exploring many media for self-discovery and self-direction is embraced
  • 29. Anchored on the curriculum design which prescribes different and separate subjects into one broad field, this approach considers the following: Subject-Centered Approach
  • 30.  The primary focus is the subject matter  The emphasis is on bits and pieces of information which are detached from life  The continuing pursuit of learning outside the school is not emphasized. Learning should only take place inside the classroom.  The subject matter serves as a means of identifying problems in living
  • 31. This approach is based on a curriculum design which assumes that in the process of living, children experience problems. Thus, problem solving enables the learners to become increasingly able to achieve complete or total development as individuals. Problem-Centered Approach
  • 32. This approach is characterized by the following views and beliefs:  The learners are capable of directing and guiding themselves in resolving problems, thus they become independent learners  The learners are prepared to assume their civic responsibilities through direct participation in different activities The curriculum leads the learners in the recognition of concerns and problems and in seeking solutions. The learners are considered problem solvers
  • 33. Human Relations-Centered Approach Learned early in life through deliberate planning by the teacher - MURIEL CROSBY • The social and interpersonal relations between human beings : a course, study, or program designed to develop better interpersonal and intergroup adjustments
  • 34. Important characteristics of human relations -centered curriculum: 1. It is founded upon a professional knowledge of human growth and development and the ways in which human beings learn. 2. It recognizes the practicalities of group life. 3. It provides opportunities to solve common problems of the group as they are manifested by the individuals in it. 4. It is concerned with the implications of the changes in the nature and complexity of modern life.
  • 36. There are three phases of such type: • Economy of teaching effort and educational resources • Economy of student effort • Economy of subject matters generated 1.Self sufficiency
  • 37. • Degree to which basic, ideas, concept, principles and generalizations of the over all aims of the curriculum. Example: If your students come from different cultural background and races. 2. Significance
  • 38. This refers to authority of content Example: Do not include typewriting as a skill to be learned by college students. It should be about the computer or information technology (IT). 3. Validity
  • 39. This criteria considers content in terms of allotment resources available and expertise of staff. Example: You have only one week to finish the unit but then the activities may take a month for the students to complete it. This is not feasible. 4. FEASIBILITY
  • 40. This refers to the placement and sequencing of subject content. 5. Learnability
  • 41. It covers the meaningfulness of the curriculum. 6. Interest
  • 42. • It suppose the usefulness of the curriculum content. • It uses the pragmatic criterion of truth. 7. UTILITY
  • 43. Types of Curriculum 1. Recommended Curriculum –refers to what scholars propose the as the most appropriate 2. Intended or Written Curriculum – prescribed by the government 3. Implemented Curriculum – actual implementation or what teachers teach in school; modified, and improved based on needs especially when there are new ideas in various disciplines 4. Achieved Curriculum – result or what had been learned in school 5. Tested Curriculum – set of learning that is assessed in teacher-made classroom tests, curriculum-referenced tests, and in standardized tests
  • 44. Types of Curriculum 6. Entitlement Curriculum – what the society believes learners should expect to learn in the educational system for them to become good members of the society 7. Supported Curriculum – reflected on and shaped by the resources allocated to support or deliver the official curriculum 8. Null or Censored Curriculum – those that must not be taught 9. Hidden Curriculum – skills, knowledge and attitudes that are learned as a result of interaction with others in school; not actually taught in formal classroom
  • 45. Curriculum Conception Curriculum workers have different ideas about curriculum matters and processes. They have different points of views about curriculum concerns, goals of what a curriculum should accomplish, and how a curriculum should be designed or constructed. This explains the presence of Curriculum Conceptions [ McNeil (2006); Eisner (1985); Print (1993)]
  • 46. Curriculum Conceptions 1. Academic Rationalist Conception – stresses the importance of different bodies of knowledge, known as discipline or subject areas 2. Cognitive Processes Conception – seeks to develop the cognition that are applicable to a wide range of intellectual problems 3. Humanistic Conception – helps individuals to discover their unique identities. Focus on the needs and interest of learners 4. Social Reconstructionist Conception – school as an agency of social change- hence, curriculum should respond to different needs, issues, problems and demands of the society
  • 47. Curriculum Conceptions 5. Technological Conception- preoccupied with the development of means to achieve curriculum or educational goals. It views schooling as a complex system that can be analyzed into its constituent components. 6. Eclectic Conception – curriculum workers find themselves with aligning their ideas with two or more curriculum conceptions
  • 48. Elements of Curriculum 1. Curriculum Intent – direction that curriculum developers wish to go; includes the aims, goals and objectives 2. Content – different topics covered in the curriculum 3. Learning Experiences - activities, strategies, methods, or approaches 4. Evaluation – tools used to check whether curriculum intent was realized
  • 49. Curriculum Influences External Factors -society, government, marketplace, alumni Organizational Influences Program Relations Resources Governance Internal Factors Faculty, students, Discipline, Program Mission Academic Plan
  • 50. Structure • Involves the ways in which classrooms and schools are organized Three Kinds of Innovation Content • Introduce subjects not previously included in the curriculum, or those that revise old subjects in new ways. Process • Apply human interactions and experiences
  • 51. Rationale for the term “Curriculum Innovation” • Rationale – (Merriam Webster’s Dictionary 2010) (1) An explanation of principles controlling belief or practice; (2) Underlying reason What is the Rationale for using the term “curriculum innovation?”
  • 52. Rationale for the term “Curriculum Innovation” • Curriculum may be viewed as ‘planned learning opportunities’ which are converted in ‘actual learning experiences’ through instruction. • Instruction maybe referred to as the implementation of the curriculum
  • 53. Rationale for the term “Curriculum Innovation” • We consider curriculum innovation both as a product in the form of a new idea, method, device, arrangement, or technology, and as a process, since it involves planning, organizing , implementing, and controlling of resources and activities, as well as evaluating outcomes, all of which are focused on a desired end- that of promoting the best interest of the school’s educational program.
  • 54. Crucial Factors that Exert Great Influence on Curriculum Change • Pupils and Students • Cultural Values • Missions, Goals and Objectives of the School • The need for Acquisition of the Cultural Heritage • The Multi-Dimensional Process of Learning • The School’s Internal Environment • The School’s External Environment • Availability of Skills and Resources Needed for the Tasks to be Undertaken • Motivation and Morale of School Personnel • Curriculum Controls Exercised by External Agencies
  • 55. Two Schools of Thought Predominated Throughout History of Curriculum Development: • The Essentialist School • The Progressive School
  • 56. The Essentialist School • It considers the curriculum as something rigid consisting of discipline subjects. • It considers all learners as much as the same and it aims to fit the learner into the existing social order and thereby maintain the status quo • Its major motivation is discipline and considers freedom as an outcome and not a means of education.
  • 57. The Essentialist School • Its approach is authoritative and the teacher’s role is to assign lessons and to recite recitations. • It is book-centered and the methods recommended are memory work , mastery of facts and skills, and development of abstract intelligence.
  • 58. The Essentialist School • It has no interest in social action and life activities. • Its measurement of outcomes are standard tests based on subject matter mastery.
  • 59. Traditional Points of View of Curriculum • Body of subjects or subject matter prepared by the teachers for the students to learn. • Synonymous to “course study”. • “Permanent studies” where the rule of grammar, reading, rhetoric, logic and mathematics for basic education emphasized.(Hutchins) • Most of the traditional ideas view curriculum as written documents or plan of action in accomplishing goals.
  • 60. The Progressive School • It conceives of the curriculum as something flexible based on areas of interest. • It is learner-centered, having in mind that no two persons are alike. • Its factor of motivation is individual achievement believing that persons are naturally good.
  • 61. The Progressive School • The Role of the teacher is to stimulate direct learning process. • It uses a life experience approach to fit the student for future social life.
  • 62. The Progressive School • Constant revision of aims and experimental techniques of teaching and learning are imperatives in curriculum development in order to create independent thinking, initiative, self-reliance, individuality, self- expression and activity in the elarner.
  • 63. The Progressive School • Its measurement of outcomes are now devices taking into consideration subject matter and personality values.
  • 64. Progressive Points of View of Curriculum • Listing of subjects, syllabi, course of study and list of courses or specific discipline can only be called curriculum if these written materials are actualized by the learner. • Total learning experiences of the individual. • All experiences children have under the guidance of teachers. – Caswell & Campbell • Experiences in the classroom which are planned and enacted by the teacher, and also learned by the students. – Marsh and Willis
  • 66. Theories of Education • Essentialism tries to instill the most essential or basic academic knowledge and skills and character development. • They believe that teachers should try to embed traditional moral and values and virtues such as respect for authority, perseverance, fidelity to duty, consideration for others, and practicality and intellectual knowledge that students need to become model citizens. • The foundation of essentialist curriculum is based on traditional disciplines such as math, natural science, history, foreign language, and literature.
  • 67. Theories of Education • In the Essentialist system, students are required to master a set body of information and basic techniques for their grade level they gradually move towards more complex skills and detailed knowledge. • Essentialists argue that classrooms should be teacher- oriented. The teacher should serve as an intellectual and moral role model for the students. The teachers or administrators decide what is most important for the students to learn with little regard to the student interests. • The teachers also focus on achievement test scores as a means of evaluating progress.
  • 68. Theories of Education • Perennialists believe that the focus of education should be the ideas that have lasted over centuries. • They believe the ideas are as relevant and meaningful today as when they were written. • They recommend that students learn from reading and analyzing the works by history's finest thinkers and writers. • Essentialists believe that when students study these works and ideas, they will appreciate learning.
  • 69. Theories of Education • Perennialist classrooms are also centered on teachers in order to accomplish these goals. • The teachers are not concerned about the students' interests or experiences. They use tried and true teaching methods and techniques that are believed to be most beneficial to disciplining students' minds. • They emphasize that students should not be taught information that may soon be outdated or found to be incorrect.
  • 70. Theories of Education • For Perennialists, the aim of education is to ensure that students acquire understandings about the great ideas of Western civilization. These ideas have the potential for solving problems in any era.
  • 71. Theories of Education • Progressivists believe that individuality, progress, and change are fundamental to one's education. • Progressivists center their curricula on the needs, experiences, interests, and abilities of students. • Progressivist teachers try making school interesting and useful by planning lessons that provoke curiosity. • In a progressivist school, students are actively learning. Students solve problems in the classroom similar to those they will encounter in their everyday lives.
  • 72. Theories of Education • Progressivists believe that education should focus on the whole child, rather than on the content or the teacher. • Active experimentation. • Learning is through experiencing the world. • It is active, not passive. • Curriculum content is derived from student interests and questions. • The scientific method is used by progressivist educators so that students can study matter and events systematically and first hand.
  • 73. Theories of Education • Social Reconstructionism is a philosophy that emphasizes the addressing of social questions and a quest to create a better society and worldwide democracy. • Reconstructionist educators focus on a curriculum that highlights social reform as the aim of education.
  • 74. Theories of Education • For social reconstructionists and critical theorists, curriculum focuses on student experience and taking social action on real problems, such as violence, hunger, international terrorism, inflation, and inequality. Strategies for dealing with controversial issues (particularly in social studies and literature), inquiry, dialogue, and multiple perspectives are the focus. • Community-based learning and bringing the world into the classroom are also strategies.
  • 75. Theories of Education • Behaviorism is a learning theory that only focuses on objectively observable behaviors and discounts any independent activities of the mind. Behavior theorists define learning as nothing more than the acquisition of new behavior based on environmental conditions.
  • 76. Theories of Education • Experiments by behaviorists identify conditioning as a universal learning process. • Classic conditioning occurs when a natural reflex responds to a stimulus. We are biologically “wired” so that a certain stimulus will produce a specific response. One of the more common examples of classical conditioning in the educational environment is in situations where students exhibit irrational fears and anxieties like fear of failure, fear of public speaking and general school phobia.
  • 77. Theories of Education • Behavioral or operant conditioning occurs when a response to a stimulus is reinforced. Basically, operant conditioning is a simple feedback system: If a reward or reinforcement follows the response to a stimulus, then the response becomes more probable in the future.
  • 78. Theories of Education • There have been many criticisms of behaviorism, including the following: • Behaviorism does not account for all kinds of learning, since it disregards the activities of the mind. • Behaviorism does not explain some learning–such as the recognition of new language patterns by young children– for which there is no reinforcement mechanism. • Research has shown that animals adapt their reinforced patterns to new information. For instance, a rat can shift its behavior to respond to changes in the layout of a maze it had previously mastered through reinforcements.
  • 79. Ralph Tyler Model: Four Basic Principle 1. Purposes of the school 2. Educational experiences related to the purpose 3. Organization of the experiences 4. Evaluation of the experiences
  • 80. Hilda Taba : Grassroots Approach 1. Diagnosis of learners needs and expectations of the larger society. 2. Formulation of learning objectives. 3. Selection of the learning content. 4. Organization of learning content. 5. Selection of the learning experiences. 6. Organization of learning activities. 7. Determination of what to evaluate and the means of doing it.
  • 81. Steps in Curriculum Development •Tyler’s Questions of Curriculum Development will provide 4 steps: •What educational purposes should the school seek to attain? •What educational experiences can be provided that are likely to attain these purposes? •How can these educational experiences be effectively organised? •How can we determine whether these purposes are being attained?
  • 82. Curriculum Development • Some curriculum experts like Tyler say that the steps are followed in a sequence or a straight line. • This model that assumes that curriculum decision making follows a straight line is called linear model 1 • Selection of Aims 2 • Selection of Content & Learning Experiences 3 • Organizsation of content & Learning Experiences 4 • Evaluation of Learning outcomes
  • 83. Curriculum Development • Other scholars argue that curriculum decision making is not a simple linear process that necessarily starts with aims. • One of them is Wheeler (1978) who believes that curriculum decision making can start from any point and can come back to any of the points e.g. like a cycle Aims, Goals & Objectives Selection of Learning Experiences Selection of Content Organisation & Integration of Learning Experiences & Content Evaluation
  • 84. Curriculum Development • Kerr (1968) also believes that curriculum process is a very comlex set of activities and decisions and they interact a lot. • Changes made in content may necessitate changes in experiences, which may again bring about changes in evaluation etc. Objective Content Learning Experience Evaluation
  • 85. Selection of Aims and Objectives • Every curriculum is aimed at developing in the learners certain competencies or abilities. The curriculum process must therefore clearly identify the aims that the curriculum is intended to achieve.
  • 86. Selection of Aims and Objectives • Curriculum aims range from the very broad to the more specific. In fact, that is why we use the terms aims, goals and objectives to refer to them. Aims are broad statements which cover all of the experiences provided in the curriculum; goals are tied to specific subjects or group of contents within the curriculum; while objectives describe the more specific outcomes that can be attained as a result of lessons or instruction delivered at the classroom.
  • 87. Factors in Selecting Aims • Analysis of our culture: we should take into account our cultural values, norms and expectations when selecting aims, • The present status of the learner: what has the learner already known? What are his/her characteristics? What is he/she ready for? • The state of our knowledge of the subject matter or content: We should examine new developments in knowledge to see if they contain things that are of real value to the learner and society.
  • 88. Factors in Selecting Aims • Relevance to school’s philosophy of education: each nation has its own philosophy of education which its schools try to implement. Nigeria’s philosophy of education is contained in its National Policy on Education. We should ask whether the objectives we select are relevant to this philosophy;
  • 89. Factors in Selecting Aims • Consistency with our theory of learning: at any time in any society, there is a dominant conception of learning i.e. our understanding what learning is and how it takes place. For instance, the National Policy on Education anticipates that the Nigerian child is active, exploratory and imaginative.
  • 90. Selection of Content & Learning Experiences • Content is what we teach; learning experience is an activity which the learner engages in which results in changes in his behaviour; • We should select those contents and learning experiences that will in attaining the goals of the curriculum; • There are some factors to consider in selecting both learning experiences and content. • We shall first examine those criteria for selecting learning experiences
  • 91. Factors in Selecting Learning Experiences • Validity: this refers to the relevance of the stated learning experience to the stated goals of the curriculum; • Relevance to life: learning experience must be related to the learner’s real life situations in and out of school; • Variety: learning experiences must cater to the needs of different types of learners by providing different types of experiences; • Suitability: learning experiences must be suitable to the learners present state of learning and characteristics:
  • 92. Selection of learning experiences… • Cumulation: even though experiences provided may be different, they should all lead to the attainment of the same goal; subsequent experiences should build on earlier ones; • Multiple Learning: a single learning experience may bring about multiple outcomes. Such learning experiences are important because of their multiple benefits.
  • 93. Factors in Selecting Content • Validity: means two things, is the content related to the objectives, and is the content true or authentic; • Significance: is the content significant or will lead it to the more mastery or more understanding of the course or subject; • Utility: here the question is whether the content selected is useful i.e. will lead to the acquisition of skills and knowledge that are considered useful by society? • Interest: is the content interesting to the learner? Or can the content be made interesting to learners? • Learnability: is the content selected such that learners can learn and understand given their present level/
  • 95. Curriculum Development in the Philippines • Touched on the religion, economic, political, and social influences and events that took place in the country. • Colonial rules in the Philippines tailored the curriculum to serve colonial goals and objectives.
  • 96. The Need for Curriculum Framework • What learning objectives should be included? • What will be the bases for the choice of objectives? • Will the choice be based on the learners’ needs and interests, or rather on the needs of the society? • Will the selection depend on tradition, the nature of knowledge, or the learners’ characteristics? • What philosophical and psychological theories regarding the nature of learners as well as the learning process will underpin the organization of the content? • Will the choice of methodology be in line with accepted teaching-learning principles? • Will the evaluation procedure be able to measure the learning that is taking place?
  • 97. The result of lack of Framework • Sari-sari (hodgepodge) • Pira-piraso (piemal) • Tagpi-tagpi (patchwork) • Sabog (lack of focus) • Malabo (vague) • Lakas ng kutob (gutfeel) • Hula-hula (hunches) • Gaya-gaya (patterned from an existing model) • Bahala na (by chance) • Patama-tama (non-deliberate)
  • 98. The Areas of Concern • Cultural Values • Knowledge of Learner • Knowledge Of Teaching-Learning Theories and Principles • Body of Knowledge
  • 99. Cultural Values Visible • Rules • Food • Dress • Language • Music • Dance • Means of Livelihood • Political Behavior • Family • Community Norms Non-Visible • Philosophy • Beliefs • Value System
  • 100. Knowledge of the Learner • Program for Decentralized Educational Development (PRODED) - Content Based (not on the learner and learning process) • The Basic Education Curriculum (BEC) and Secondary Education Development Program (SEDP) – addresses the learner and learning process
  • 101. Determinants of Learning in Philippines • Educational Development Project Implementing Task Force(EDPITAF) – revealed that community and home variables have greater impact on learning than school factors. Factors: • Use of electricity • Parental education • Parents’ perception of academic abilities and interests of the children • Parents’ attitude • Geography (Region) • School Type • Socio economic status of the Family
  • 102. Knowledge of Teaching-Learning Principles • Behaviorism • Cognitive Development Psychology • Cognitive Field Psychology The New Elementary School Curriculum (NESC) and New Secondary Education Curriculum (NSEC) - demonstrate ample evidence of the inclusion of behaviorist psychological principles through the use of behavioral objectives, drills, practices, and homeworks reinforces learning.
  • 103. HISTORICAL CONTEXT • Before 1521 – Education before the coming of the Spaniards • 1521-1896 –Education during the Spanish Regime • 1896 -1898 – Education during Philippine Revolution • 1899 – 1935 – Education during the American Occupation • 1935 – 1941 – Education during the Philippine Commonwealth • 1941 – 1944 – Education during the Japanese Occupation • 1945 – 1946 – Education after WWII • 1946 – present – Education under the Philippine Republic
  • 104. The Pre-Spanish Curriculum • The Filipino possessed a culture of their own. • They had contacts with other foreign peoples from Arabia, India, China, Indo-China, and Borneo. • The inhabitants were civilized people, possessing their systems of writing, laws and moral standards in a well organized government.
  • 105. The Pre-Spanish Curriculum • As shown in the rule of Barangays, their code of laws –the code of Kalantiao and Maragtas, their belief in Bathala, and the solidarity of the family were obedience and respect had been practiced.
  • 106. Pre-Spanish Devised-Cur • The Spanish Missionaries aim to control of the Filipinos, both body and soul. • The curriculum then consisted of 3 R’s (reading, writing and religion) to attain goals were the acceptance of Catholicism and the acceptance of Spanish rule.
  • 107. The Spanish Devised Cur. • The schools were parochial or convent schools. • The main readings were the catecismo. • The method of instruction was mainly individual memorization.
  • 108. AMERICAN Devised Cur. • The motive of the Americans was to conquer the Filipinos not only physically but also mentally. • The curriculum was based on the ideals and traditions of America and her hierarchy of values. • English was the medium of instruction.
  • 109. American Devised Cur. • The primary curriculum prescribed for the Filipinos consisted of three grades which provides training in two aspects: 1. Body Training – physical education 2. Mental Training – English, Nature Study, and Arithmetic.
  • 110. Commonwealth Curriculum • (1935-1946) considered as the period of expansion and reform in the Philippine curriculum. • The educational leaders expanded the curriculum by introducing course in farming, domestic science, etc.
  • 111. Commonwealth Curriculum • Commonwealth Act 586, also known as educational Act of 1940, recognized the elementary school system.
  • 112. Japanese Devised Curriculum • They devised a curriculum for the Filipinos to suit their vested interest. • They introduced many changes in the curriculum by including Nippongo, and abolishing English as the medium of instruction and as a subject.
  • 113. Japanese Devised Curriculum • All textbooks were censored and revised. • It caused a “black out” in Philippine education and impeded the educational progress of the Filipinos.
  • 114. Liberation Period Curriculum • (1945) Steps were taken to improve the curriculum existing before the war, some steps taken were to restore grade VII, to abolish the double-single session, and most especially to adopt the modern trends in education taken from the U.S.
  • 115. Liberation Period Curriculum • The curriculum remained basically the same as before and was still subject-centered.
  • 116. Philippine Republic Cur. • Great experiments in the community school and the use of vernacular in the first two grades of the primary schools as the medium of instruction were some of them.
  • 117. Philippine Republic Cur. • An experiment worth mentioning that led to a change in the Philippine Educational Philosophy was that of school and community collaboration pioneered by Jose V. Aguilar. • Schools are increasingly using instructional materials that are Philippine-oriented.
  • 118. Philippine Republic Cur. • Memorandum No. 30, 1966 sets the order of priority in the purchase of books for use in the schools were as follows: • Books which are contributions to Phil. Literature • Books on character education and other library materials • Library equipment and permanent features
  • 119. Curriculum Design • The Subject-Area Design • The Integrated Design • The Core-Curriculum Design • The Child-Centered Design • The Social Reconstruction Design • The De-schooling Design
  • 120. Subject – Centered Design • FOCUS - A group of subjects or subject matter that represent the essential knowledge and values of society that have survived the test of time. • PHILOSOPHICAL ORIENTATION – Essentialism • PROPOENT / S – Adler, Hutchins
  • 121. Integrated Design • FOCUS - the integration of two or more subjects, both within and across disciplines, into an integrated course. • PHILOSOPHICAL ORIENTATION – Experimentalism • PROPONENT / S – Broudy, Silberman
  • 122. Core Curriculum Design • FOCUS – a common body of curriculum content and learning experience that should be encountered by all students – The great books • PHILOSOPHICAL ORIENTATION – Perennialism • PROPONENT /S – Goodlad / Boyer
  • 123. Child-Centered Design • FOCUS – Learning activities centered around the interests and needs of the child, designed to motivate and interest the child in the learning process. • PHILOSOPHICAL ORIENTATION – Progressivism • PROPONENT / S – Dewey , Eisner
  • 124. Social Reconstructionist • FOCUS – critical analysis of the political, social, and economic problems facing society; future trends; social action projects designed to bring about social change. • PHILOSOPHICAL ORIENTATION – Social Reconstruction • PROPONENT / S – Shane , Bramald
  • 125. Deschooling • FOCUS – in-school experiences, primarily in the social sciences, designed to develop the child’s sense of freedom from the domination of the political, social, and economic systems; out of school experiences of equal value. • PHILOSOPHICAL ORIENTATION – Social Reconstructionism • PROPONENT /S - Freire , Goodman
  • 127. IMPLEMENTATION MODELS 1. Overcoming Resistance to Change (ORC) 2. Leadership Obstacle Course (LOC) 3. Linkage Model 4. Organizational Development (OD) 5. Rand Change Agent Model
  • 128. ORC * Focuses on overcoming staff resistance to change that is present immediately before, or at the time of the introduction of the innovation.
  • 129. LOC • Extends the ORC model and puts emphasis on the gathering of data to determine the extent and nature of the resistance in order to deal with it appropriately.
  • 130. The Linkage Model • The linkage process involves a cycle of diagnosis, search, retrieval, formulation of solution, dissemination and evaluation.
  • 131. OD • This model is an information-processing change strategy that enables the system to improve its operations and the quality of interactions among its members to facilitate the introduction of change.
  • 132. Rand Model • The Rand Model is based on the assumption that the success of the implementation of new program depends on: • A. The characteristics of the proposed change • B. Competencies of the teaching and administrative staff • C. The support of the local community • D. The School organizational structure
  • 133. Factors Affecting the Choice of Implementation Model 1. Level of Resistance 2. Type of desired change 3. Available expertise 4. Available resources 5. Urgency of the situation
  • 135. DEFINITION OF EVALUATION Curriculum evaluation is a systematic process of determining whether the curriculum as designed and implemented has produced or is producing the intended and desired results. It is the means of determining whether the program is meeting its goals, that is whether the measures / outcomes for a given set of instructional inputs match the intended or pre-specified outcomes. (Tuckman, 1979)
  • 136. Types of Evaluation 1.Humanistic approach – goal free 2.Scientific approach – purpose driven
  • 137. Objectives of Evaluation 1. Scope – (teaching –program-cost effectiveness) 2. Timing – (formative, summative, impact) 3. Method – ( quantitative, qualitative) 4. Level – (classroom, school, national) 5. Personnel involved – (individual teachers, committees, consultants)
  • 138. Role of Evaluation in Cur. Dev
  • 139. Evaluation Studies in the Philippines 1. 1925 Monroe Survey 2. 1959 Swanson Survey 3. 1969 Presidential Commission to Survey Philippine Education (PCSPE) 4. 1976 Survey of Outcomes of Elementary Education (SOUTELE) 5. 1982 Household and School Matching Survey 6. 1991 Congressional Commission on Education (EDCOM) 7. 1991 National Evaluation and Impact Study of PRODED
  • 140. MONROE SURVEY 1. Administrative organization and supervision 2. Elementary education 3. Secondary Education 4. Higher Education 5. Teacher education and training 6. Language of instruction 7. Private education 8. Finance 9. Education of the non-Christians
  • 141. SWANSON SURVEY 1. Elementary education 2. Secondary education 3. Vocational education 4. Teacher training 5. Organization and administration 6. Financing the public schools 7. The report included a deterioration of performance in reading, language and arithmetic due to poor instructional methods, large class sizes, and inadequate supervision
  • 142. Presidential Commission to Survey Philippine Education (PCSPE) 1. Analyze performance of the educational system and its relevance to national developmental goals 2. Ascertain the efficiency of the system 3. Identify areas which need more detailed investigation. 4. The report included findings on : a. Mismatch between educational services and manpower requirements b. Mismatch between education priorities and the national development priorities c. Inequitable distribution of educational facilities and resources across the regions d. Lack of systematic planning and evaluation
  • 143. SURVEY OF OUTCOMES OF ELEM EDUCATION (SOUTELE) 1. Battery of achievement tests designed to measure the outcomes of elementary education 2. General mental ability test of non-verbal type designed to measure association 3. Student’s attitude inventory aimed to measure affective objectives 4. Questionnaires in order to establish the profiles of pupils, teachers, school heads, etc. 5. The study revealed deficiencies of elementary education in terms of inputs (resources), processes (curriculum and instruction), and outputs (students’ achievement). These are affected by socio economic, school types, quality of teaching.
  • 144. The Household and School Matching Survey (HSMS) 1. The survey hypothesized that learning is predicated on the antecedent academic, social, physiological variables. 2. The findings of the investigation showed that home- related and community related variables have greater influences on learning than school related factors such as cost per pupil and numbers of textbooks per students.
  • 145. The Congressional Commission on Education Study (EDCOM) 1. Enhancing the internal capability of the system to satisfactorily implement the constitutional provisions on education 2. Providing the system with necessary financial and other infrastructure support 3. Strengthening the system’s linkages with all sectors concerned in human resource development 4. Assisting the system to achieve its sectoral goals and targets through strategies that are consistent with the nation’s development goals.
  • 146. The National Evaluation and Impact Study of PRODED 1. Teacher factor is crucial in the success of the teaching-learning process 2. There is a need to improve the pre-service and in- service training of teachers that should include the development of skills in classroom management, teacher-pupil interaction, and the use of instructional aids, etc.
  • 147. Monitoring and Evaluation of RBEC 1. Defines what levels of learning students of schools and divisions meet at various stages of the basic education cycle based on the national curriculum. 2. Setting of minimum national standards for capabilities, structures, processes and output based on a template for school improvement processes from planning to implementation to monitoring and evaluation 3. Nationally standardized student assessment, outcomes measurement and reporting of basic school statistics
  • 148. Presidential Commission on Educational Reform (PCER) 1. Created through E.O. in 1988 to define a budget feasible program of reform, and identify executive priority policy recommendations and items for a legislative agenda on education. 2. Comprised of multi sectoral group 3. Proposed the establishment of National Education Evaluation and Testing System (NEETS) that assumes responsibility for educational assessment of all levels, including technical and skills development
  • 150. BILINGUAL EDUCATION 1. Article 14, sect 7 of 1987 constitution – “for the purposes of communication and instruction, the official languages of the Philippines are Filipino and until otherwise provided by law, English.” 2. DECS Order 52, s. 1987 – the policy of bilingual education aims to make every Filipino competent in both Filipino and English at the national level 3. DECS defines bilingual as “separate use of Filipino and English as media of instruction in specific subjects.”
  • 151. Early Childhood Care and Development (ECCD) 1. Art 15, Sec 2, 1987 Phil. Cons. – recognizes the “right of children to assistance, including proper care and nutrition, and special protection from all forms of neglect, abuse, cruelty, exploitation and other conditions prejudicial to their development.” 2. UN Convention on the Rights of Child 3. Education for All (EFA) agenda of DECS, 1990 envisioned 90% in 2000 of early childhood care and development either home-based services or kindergarten / nursery classes
  • 152. Other issues 1. Access to pre-school education 2. Private Pre-school education 3. Global education 4. Environmental education