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Input/Output: Paper Prototyping for the Future

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The I/O: Paper Prototyping for the Future half-day studio will be a hands-on experience that combines art, design, and technology. Participants will learn through a series of escalating exercises how to introduce interactivity via computational crafting techniques to paper in order to heighten the paper prototyping experienc

Published in: Design, Technology
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Input/Output: Paper Prototyping for the Future

  1. I/O Paper Prototyping for the Future Joselyn McDonald & Nicole Messier
  2. Welcome
  3. Introductions
  4. Overview §  Design Challenge 1 §  Prototype as Practice §  Paper as Art/Design §  Break §  Paper Folding Techniques §  Design Challenge 2 §  Break §  Intro to Paper Circuits §  Design Challenge 3 §  Break §  Design Challenge 4 §  Wrap-Up
  5. Design Challenge 1 Consider what you imagined ‘the future’ would look like when you were a child. (2 min) Now, using paper, design an interactive item that belongs to that future scenario. (5 min)
  6. Prototyping as a Practice
  7. Stanford D-School Iterative Design Process Stanford d.School
  8. What is a prototype?
  9. What is a prototype? Prototypes are a core means of exploring, testing, and evaluating aspects of an interactive artifact. Term can be ambiguous, as many disciplines consider prototypes to be different things.
  10. Prototypes and Realms Paper renderings Paper structures Storyboards Video Simulations 3D Renderings Physical Simulations “What Do Prototypes Prototype?”, Houde and Hill,
  11. Why do we prototype?
  12. Why do we prototype? §  To provide clarity to our team and stakeholders about our ideas §  To better understand how users will interact with our final artifact §  To define and test assumptions §  To create avenues for feedback from users §  To incorporate user feedback earlier on
  13. Paper Prototyping
  14. Traditional Paper Prototyping In interaction design, paper prototyping is an often-used practice that allows designers to test interactive elements of software. Cheap and Fast
  15. Traditional Paper Prototyping
  16. Traditional Paper Prototyping
  17. Paper Prototyping 2.0
  18. Broader Adoption of Paper Prototyping Artists, designers (used broadly), and technologists are adopting paper as a reliable medium for quickly (and cheaply) testing installation elements, games, interactive artwork and more. Sometimes, they continue to use paper in their final design.
  19. What Lies Beneath Gabby O’Connor Final Piece
  20. What Lies Beneath Gabby O’Connor Paper Prototype
  21. Edgv and Wendy Plomp Papercave Papercave Edgv and Wendy Plomp
  22. Old Farmer Brown Hedler, Hägglund, Lundgren and Wellence Paper Game
  23. Decimuted Bea Szenfeld “I was bored of working in fabric and started experimenting with materials. I fell in love with paper and what you can create with such a simple material,” says Szenfeld
  24. Bea Szenfeld Decimuted Decimuted Bea Szenfeld
  25. Wad aus Wald Takashi Kuribayashi
  26. Wad aus Wald Takashi Kuribayashi
  27. Crystalline Highlands Messier, McDonald, Matchett Paper Installation
  28. Messier, McDonald, Matchett Crystalline Highlands Crystalline Highlands Messier, McDonald, Matchett
  29. Michelangelo Pistoletto Mirror of Judgement Mirror of Judgement Michelangelo Pistoletto
  30. Paper Objects Peter Gentenaar
  31. Paper Objects Peter Gentenaar Paper Prototype
  32. Kompost Backpack J Tollington
  33. Discussion
  34. Paper Engineering Techniques*this section pulls from Paul Jacksons’ book Folding Techniques for Designers: From Sheet to Form
  35. Paper Engineering Tools §  Paper §  Hands §  Pencil §  X-Acto Knife §  Ruler or straight edge --------------------------------- §  Tape §  Bone Folder
  36. Symbols
  37. Valley  Fold   Mountain  Fold   Unfolded  Valley  Fold   Unfolded  Mountain  Fold   Bring  the    le5   edge  to  the  right   Bring  the    right  edge  to   the  center   Symbols
  38. Equally Dividing Paper
  39. Equally Dividing Paper Step 1: Fold paper in half
  40. Equally Dividing Paper Step 2: Fold the left and right edges of your paper to the center edge.
  41. Equally Dividing Paper Step 3: Fold the left edge of your paper to the two new edges.
  42. Rule for Equal Divisions For every new edge that is created, fold the left and right edges of your paper to the new edge.
  43. Equally Dividing Paper Step 4: Fold the right edge of your paper to the two new edges.
  44. Equally Dividing Paper Step 5: Flip the paper over, and make the following folds with the left edge.
  45. Equally Dividing Paper Step 6: Fold the right edge to the marked mountain edges.
  46. How would you make grid divisions?
  47. Rotational Divisions
  48. Rotational Divisions Step 1: Fold paper in half.
  49. Rotational Divisions Step 2: Fold the top left and right edges to the center edge.
  50. Remember the Rule? For every new edge that is created, fold the left and right edges of your paper to the new edge.
  51. Rotational Divisions Step 3: Fold the left edge to the new edges.
  52. Rotational Divisions Step 4: Fold the right edge to the same edges.
  53. Rotational Divisions Step 5: Flip the paper over, and make the following folds with the left-top edge.
  54. Rotational Divisions Step 6: Fold the right-top edge to the marked edges.
  55. Rotational Variations
  56. Rotational Divisions
  57. Rotational Divisions Cut two half circles with similar arcs.
  58. Patterns
  59. Symmetry
  60. Translation
  61. Translation
  62. Let the paper make the folds.
  63. Reflection
  64. Reflection
  65. Reflection
  66. Reflection
  67. Reflection
  68. Reflection
  69. Pop-ups
  70. Pop-ups
  71. Paper Engineering Tips
  72. Paper Engineering Tips §  Use the edges of the paper to divide it into equal parts. §  Use the dull side of an X-Acto knife to form creases. §  Let the paper make the difficult folds. §  Make repetitive folds in the same direction (valley fold or mountain fold) to create simple closed and/or deployable structures. §  Do not worry about having exact proportions for folding patterns. §  Use the same techniques with different edge combinations and origins.
  73. Design Challenge Architecture You are living in an urban city on a Totokaelo, a recently inhabited planet, that has unpredictable weather patterns. To help protect the city’s harvest, architects are designing smart buildings that organically change shape depending on the weather conditions. Design Challenge: Use the paper folding techniques to prototype a building that will protect the harvest during harsh weather conditions and nurture the harvest during optimal weather. Tip: Think about different shapes, deployable forms, and letting the paper make the folds!
  74. Design Challenge Clothing As an inhabitant of Totokaelo, you need dynamic clothing garments that help make you visible during unpredictable snow storms and protect you against the wind and cold. Design Challenge: Using paper engineering techniques, prototype a garment that will increase visibility and provide protection from harsh weather. Tip: Think about deployable forms
  75. Break
  76. Paper Circuits
  77. What you’ll need!
  78. Coin Cell Batteries – 3v Know the positive side of the coin cell from the negative. NegativePositive
  79. Light Emitting Diode (LED) The longer leg is the positive (anode) side of the LED. The shorter leg is the negative (cathode), or ground, side of the LED.
  80. Copper Tape Like regular tape, but made with metal, so it conducts electricity. Helpful to cut tape in half. Challenge: Bends and circles
  81. Simple Circuit
  82. Parallel Circuit
  83. Copper Tape Switch
  84. Explore
  85. Design Challenge Architecture You are living in an urban city on a Totokaelo, a recently inhabited planet, that has unpredictable weather patterns. To help protect the city’s harvest, architects are designing smart buildings that organically change shape depending on the weather conditions. Design Challenge: Use the paper folding techniques to prototype a building that will protect the harvest during harsh weather conditions and nurture the harvest during optimal weather. Tip: Think about switches, on/off, deployable forms, and letting the paper make the folds!
  86. Design Challenge Clothing As an inhabitant of Totokaelo, you need dynamic clothing garments that help make you visible during unpredictable snow storms and protect you against the wind and cold. Design Challenge: Combine paper engineering and soft-circuit techniques to prototype a garment that will make you visible and protect against harsh weather if necessary. Tip: Think about deployable forms, on/ off switches, and functional aesthetics.
  87. Design Challenge 4 Find your ‘item from the future’ from the Design Challenge 1. Redesign your ‘item from the future’ to incorporate paper prototyping techniques from today (5 min)
  88. Wrap Up Joselyn McDonald | josmcdos@gmail.com Nicole Messier | nicoleyimessier@gmail.com

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