A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN:<br />THE INTEGRATION OF ICT’S INTO THE MULTILINGUA PROGRAM<br />JORGE EDUARDO PINEDA<br /...
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics
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Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics

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Academic Proposal Convocatoria 2009 Tics

  1. 1. A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN:<br />THE INTEGRATION OF ICT’S INTO THE MULTILINGUA PROGRAM<br />JORGE EDUARDO PINEDA<br />C.C. 98.643.145<br />Propuesta académica<br />Sección Servicios – Escuela de Idiomas<br />Escuela de Idiomas<br />Universidad de Antioquia<br />TABLE OF CONTENTS<br />Page <br />Introduction 3Context 3Concerns 5Professional Development5The need for professional Development6The reflective model applied to the integration of ICT’s into the language classroom7The definition of ICT’s7The characteristics of blogs9On materials10The cycle for the reflective model in a program of professional development on the integration of ICT’s into the classroom12Conclusions 13<br />INTRODUCTION<br />Information and Communication Technologies (ICT’s) have a great impact on everyday’s lives. ICT’s have impact on industry, commerce and education among others. In other words, ICT’s have make our lives easier. The impact of ICT’s on education will broaden the scope of learning and teaching. Teachers optimize their teaching processes and the implementation of ICT’s give learners the opportunity to learn in a more efficient way. Tinio (2003) and Haddad (2002) state that ICT’s help increase the quality of education in 3 issues. (1) By increasing learner motivation and engagement, (2) By facilitating the acquisition of basic language skills, and (3) by uncovering the need to enhance teacher training.<br />This paper aims at reflecting on the use of ICT’s in the language programs at Sección Servicios and specifically at Multilingua Program. From my experience as the head of the program, I have learned that teachers at Multilingua claim a big need for integrating ITC’s into their teaching practices. But for this integration to be effective there is a big need for professional development programs, and that need must be taken into consideration.<br />This paper is divided into 5 parts. First, we will explore the context where the proposal will take place. Second, the concerns which lead me to this proposal will be discussed. Third, a discussion on the concept of professional development will be carried out. Fourth, we will reflect on how to apply the reflective model of professional development to the integration of ICT’s into language programs. And finally, a discussion on the relationship between the reflective model to this proposal will take place.<br />CONTEXT<br />The Sección Servicios is part of the School of Languages. The Sección Servicios administers several language programs aiming at different actors in the community in general and the University community in particular, for example, the reading comprehension program, the program of Capacitación Docente and the proficiency exams program. One of the most important programs is the Multiltilingua Program. <br />The Multilingua Program was created in 1997 and today plays a very important role as it is becoming a key strategy in the plans the University has to become one of the most prestigious universities in Latin America and the world. (Universidad de Antioquia, Plan de Acción 2006-2016)<br />The Multilingua program offers language training in 8 different languages: English, French, Italian, Portuguese, German, Turkish, Japanese and Chinese. <br />The program has certain characteristics:<br />The teachers at this program are proficient speakers of the language, however, they lack training in language teaching.<br />The program lacks teaching and learning materials.<br />The program has several technological resources such as laptops, computer rooms or video beams.<br />The program has 3 aspects on which the efforts should be focused. (1) Professional development programs are paramount, (2) there is a need to have materials contextualized to the students’ lives and backgrounds, and (3) there is a need to integrate the technological resources available into the programs. The combination of these three aspects leads to an improvement in the teaching processes and therefore an optimization of the learning processes. As stated by Dudeney and Hockley (2007) technology presents us with new opportunities for learning, and promotes the need for teacher training. Tinio (2003) and Hadded (2002)<br />CONCERNS<br />There are many reasons to attempt to integrate technology into the language classrooms. Dudeney and Hockley (2007) list the following. Learners have access to the Internet from their homes, at school or at internet cafés, young learners are growing up with technology, technology offers opportunities for collaboration and communication between learners, technology offers new ways for practicing and assessing performance, and learners expect language programs to integrate technology into teaching. The Multilingua program meets all of the reasons listed above, but this attempt to integrate technology into the language classrooms must be accompanied by a professional development program in which teachers reflect on the advantages of using technology, they overcome the challenges that technology may present, they learn how to use software to make their lessons more enjoyable and effective, they learn how to create materials which are more contextualized and appropriate for their students.<br />A call for professional development in Multilingua is a need and this proposal will aim at satisfying this need.<br />PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT<br />There are many types of strategies when it comes to talk about professional development. They range from workshops, seminars, in-service days and courses. This proposal favors the concept in which professional development is viewed as an ongoing learning process in which teachers engage voluntarily to learn how best to adjust their teaching to the learning needs of their students. As stated by Diaz-Maggioli (2004) professional development programs embody professional self-disclosure, reflection, and growth and these actions present better results when sustained over time. In other words, professional development programs are not one-shot, one-size-fits-all events, but evolving processes. This proposal aims at this type of professional development because it is the one that best fits the characteristics of the Multilingua program and its teachers.<br />THE NEED FOR PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT<br />The program of professional development in this proposal is based on the idea of a renewal of professional skills and knowledge as teachers cannot be given everything they need to know as stated by Richards and Farrell (2005). Gonzalez (2003) points out that the preparation of teachers has to continue because the pre-service preparation of language teachers is insufficient or inexistent as it is the case of most of the teachers at Multilingua. She also states that professional development programs should be seen as a way to accomplish the teachers’ need to be up to date with their academic and professional lives. Sierra (2007) pinpoints that professional development programs empower teachers to make decisions about schools and students. <br />Teachers at Multilingua need to be given the necessary training to update their knowledge on how to integrate technology into their lessons by reflecting, discussing to get a deeper understanding of their practices as language teachers and the use of technology. <br />The model used in this proposal to develop the professional development plan for teachers at Multilingua is based on the reflective model. The reflective model for teacher learning recognizes that teachers have experiential knowledge developed in action as suggested by Wallace (1991). In other words, in this plan of professional development, teachers will learn from experience through a process of focused critical reflection. Schon (1983); Wallace (1991); Richards and Lockhart (1994); as cited by Richards and Farrell (2005). And teachers will be empowered to build their own knowledge; professional development will be viewed as a personal construction. Freeman and Richards (1996), as cited in Richards and Farrell (2005)<br />THE REFLECTIVE MODEL OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT APPLIED TO THE INTEGRATION OF ICT’S INTO MULTILINGUA PROGRAM.<br />For this discussion we will consider the following concepts:<br />THE DEFINITION OF ICT’S<br />Tinio (2003) and Burton (2002) define ICT’s as a diverse set of technological tools and resources used to communicate, to create, disseminate, store, and manage information. They also pinpoint that these technologies not only include computers and the internet, but also broadcasting technology as radio and television and telephony. <br />According to a study from the Directorate General of education and Culture from the International Certificate Conference in 2002, ICT’S are defined as ubiquitous in contemporary society and the report states ICT’S permeate all levels of human interaction. The report also suggests the need to provide education and training to meet the challenges and opportunities fuelled by the development and the necessary effect of ICT’S on teaching and learning.<br />The report also pinpoints the fact that thanks to ICT’S barriers are broken now faster and easier than in physical terms and there is a strong need to provide teachers with training on how to deal with this new paradigm of teacher and learner roles. The report suggests that teachers have to abandon traditional roles and they have to explore the new media themselves as learners to act later as role models for their students.<br />There are many reasons why teachers may want to integrate technology into their practices. Youngkyun et al (2008) state that the use of ICT’S can facilitate active learning, foster cooperative learning and behavior, serve as tool for curriculum differentiation, provide opportunities to adapt learning to the needs of students. However, they state that teachers should use technology truly believing in its effectiveness in the classroom.<br />The integration of ICT’s into the language classroom can give learners the opportunity to access knowledge from distant sources, teachers can keep the students informed about news and processes carried out in class, and they bring richness and diversity in materials that motivate students and promote learning. Tinio (2003) Fernández (2006) Cabrero (2002) <br />Dudeney and Hockly (2007) suggest how to implement ICT’s into the classroom. They state that teachers can use websites, they can design internet-based projects, they can email key pals, they can use class blogs, and they can download and print material, they can make more contextualized materials.<br />THE CHARACTERISTICS OF BLOGS<br />To begin with, I think it is necessary to define what a blog is. A blog is essentially a web page with regular diary or journal entries as stated by Dudeney and Hockly (2007). They also classify blogs into 3 categories when they are used in classrooms: tutor blogs, student blogs and class blogs. The use of those blogs can be summarized in the following chart.<br />Tutor blogsStudent blogsClass blogsSet homeworkProvide personal and family information (pictures included)Reactions to a film, an article, class topic or current affair can be postedProvide a summary of class workExtra writing practice on class topicsThings learners like/don’t like doing in classProvide links to extra reading/listening materialRegular comments on current affairsA class project on any topicProvide answers to possible students’ questionsResearch and present information on a topicProvides exam/study tipsA photo blog on a specific topic<br />Adapted from Dudeney and Hockly (2007)<br />For the purpose of this proposal, the selected type of blog will be a tutor blog in which the teacher will upload the materials designed for the students to have extra practice material.<br />Streight (2009) on his blog provides some characteristics of blogs. He suggests that blog content should be radiant, relevant, not commonly found, full of good content for the users to enjoy, explore in depth the information about a topic, firm in purpose, be a repository of information, be realistic, and be easily searchable.<br />ON MATERIALS<br />Crawford (2002) suggests that commercial teaching material deskill teachers and prevent them from their capacity to develop professionally and respond to their students’ real needs. Therefore, a professional development program on the development of materials using technology becomes a progressive proposal since it will allow teachers create their own materials thinking about their students’ needs and real linguistic level. Crawford (2002) also pinpoints the fact that commercial teaching materials contain language that has little to do with reality. She states that the discussion should not be led to whether teachers should use commercially prepared materials, but the discussion should be led to what form they should take so the outcomes are positive for teachers and learners rather than restrictive.<br />Crawford (2002) provides a list of characteristics that teachers should take into consideration when acting as material writers.<br />The language should be functional and should be contextualized. Language should emerge from the context where it occurs.<br />Language development requires learner engagement in purposeful use of language. Materials should contain information on form and usage of language for students so that they can be used as references beyond the classroom and independently of the teacher.<br />The language used should be realistic and authentic. The language in the material should not be constrained and should be amenable to exploitation for teaching language purposes’. Tommilson (2001) states that materials will contain more engaging content, which will be of developmental value to learners as well as offering good intake of language use.<br />Classroom materials will usually seek to include an audio visual component. Audio visual material can create an environment rich in linguistic and cultural information about the target language.<br />Effective teaching materials foster learner autonomy. The activities and the materials proposed should be flexible and designed to develop skills and strategies that can be transferred to other texts in other contexts.<br />Learning needs to engage learners both affectively and cognitively. The intake of new knowledge into the existing language system takes place only when the interaction takes place spontaneously in purposeful situation. <br />Finally Crawford (2002) and Tommilson (2001) suggest that teachers are the best producers of materials since they know their contexts, their students’ levels and needs. Teachers should become active producers of materials and not passive consumers of others’.<br />THE CYCLE FOR THE REFLECTIVE MODEL IN A PROGRAM OF PREFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ON THE INTEGRATION OF ICT’S INTO THE CLASSROOM.<br />Teachers at Multilingua need to develop professionally, the first stage on this development is the reflection on the teacher’s own practice to identify weak points, possible threats, identify the strengths and make the necessary changes. Barlett (1990) proposes 5 steps for the process of reflecting teaching which will be adapted for the purpose of this proposal.<br />Step 1. Mapping: On this stage an exploration on how the teachers use the ICT’s will take place. <br />Step 2. Informing: On this stage the information found on the first step will be addressed to the teachers.<br />Step 3. Contesting: on this step teachers will be confronted with the situation found in the previous steps and reflection on how the ICT’s are implemented takes place.<br />Step 4. Appraisal: on this step the reflections on the way teachers are using the ICT’s turn into possibilities of change.<br />Step 5. Acting: on this stage a program for the integration of ICT’s takes place after analyzing, discussing and confronting teachers with the way they are using the ICT’s in their classrooms.<br />For this process to be reflexive, the steps do not have to be linear. In reflecting on teaching one may go through the cycle several times and the elements in the cycle are not necessarily followed one after the other as suggested by Barlett (1990).<br />CONCLUSION<br />The use of technology in the classroom broadens the scope for both teachers and students. However, the integration of ICT’s into the classroom must be accompanied by a professional development program because teachers have negative attitudes towards the use of technology. This professional development program will allow the integration of ICT’s into the Multilingua program and the integration of ICT’s into the classrooms will facilitate learning and will give the chance to teachers to be updated with the world today. In other words, this professional development program will provide teachers with new ideas to be integrated in their teaching practices. Also, this professional development program gives the chance to teachers to produce contextualized material. The material that responds to the students’ needs and linguistic levels.<br />REFERENCES<br />Barlett, L. (1990). Teacher development through reflective teaching. In Richards, J.C., and Nunan, D., eds., 1990. Second Language Teacher Education. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.202-214 <br />Baek , Jaeyeob Jung, Bokyeong Kim (2008). What makes teachers use technology in the classroom? Exploring the factors affecting facilitation of technology with a Korean sample. Computers & Education 50 (2008) 224–234<br />Crawford, J. (2002). The role of materials in the language classrooms: finding the balance. In Richard, J & Renandya, W. Methodology in Language Teaching: An anthology of current practice. Cambridge University Press.<br /> <br />Diaz-Maggioli, G. (2004). A passion for learning: Teacher-centered professional development. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum. Retrieved from http://www.cal.org/resources/Digest/0303diaz <br />Dudeney, G. Hockley, N. (2007). How to teach English with technology. Longman. <br />Freeman, D., and Richards, J. (1996). Teacher Learning in Language Teaching. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.<br />González, A. (2003). Who is educating EFL teachers: a qualitative study of in-service in Colombia. IKALA, Vol 8, Nro. 14 153-172<br />González, A., Montoya, C. & Sierra, N. (2002). What do EFL teachers seek in professional development programs? Voices from teachers. IKALA, Vol 7, Nro. 13 29-50<br />Haddad, Wadi D. and Jurich, Sonia (2002),“ICT for Education: Potential and Potency”, in Haddad,W. & Drexler, A. (eds), echnologies for Education: Potentials, Parameters, and Prospects (Washington DC: Academy for Educational Development and Paris: UNESCO), pp. 34-37<br />http://blogcorevalues.blogspot.com/2005/04/18-characteristics-of-good-blog.html<br />Sierra, A. (2007). Developing knowledge, skills and attitudes through a study group: a study on teachers´professional development. IKALA, Vol 12, Nro. 18 279-305<br />Tinio, V. 2003. ICT in Education. e-primers for the Information, Economy, Society and Policy. Series editors: Emmannuel C. Lallana. UNDP-APDIP, 2003, 32 pages. Available at: http://www.apdip.net/publications/iespprimers/eprimer-edu.pdf <br />Tomlinson, B. (2001). Materials Development. In Carter, R & Nunan, D (Editors).The Cambridge guide to teaching English to speakers of other languages. Cambridge University Press. <br />The Impact of Information and Communications Technologies on the Teaching of Foreign Languages and on the Role of Teachers of Foreign Languages (2002). A report commissioned by the Directorate General of Education and Culture. Retrieved fromhttp://ec.europa.eu/education/languages/archive/key/studies_en.html<br />Universidad de Antioquia, plan de desarrollo, retrieved November 22, 2007 from http://www.udea.edu.co/pdi2016/ <br />Wallace, M. (1991). Training Foreign Language Teachers. A Reflective Approach. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. <br />

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