Nova Scotia's founding cultures
The ACADIANS
SOURCES: WWW.NOVASCOTIA.COM & WWW.CBC.CA
SETTLEMENT
The first Acadian Census took place in Port Royal in
1671. One of the first in Canada, the total count was 392
...
Louisbourg
In 1719 work began on Fortress Louisbourg to protect
France’s interests. It was to become one of the busiest
po...
expulsion
At the beginning of the French and Indian War of 1754,
the British government demanded that Acadians take an
oat...
CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE
Video was not exported from SlideRocket
expulsion
expulsion
Grand Dérangement
About 6,000 Acadians were forcibly removed from their
colonies on August 11th. The British military orde...
Grand Dérangement
resettlement
As a result of the deportation and the subsequent
migrations, the Acadians ended up in the New England
States...
resettlement
The expulsion did not end in 1755. Three years later the
Acadians who fled to Île St. Jean (Prince Edward Isl...
ACADIA TODAY
240,000 French speaking people in New Brunswick,
39,500 in Nova Scotia and 6,000 in Prince Edward Island.
Oth...
ACADIA TODAY
The Acadians
The Acadians
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The Acadians

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Grade 9 Social Studies

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The Acadians

  1. 1. Nova Scotia's founding cultures The ACADIANS SOURCES: WWW.NOVASCOTIA.COM & WWW.CBC.CA
  2. 2. SETTLEMENT The first Acadian Census took place in Port Royal in 1671. One of the first in Canada, the total count was 392 people, 482 cattle, and 524 sheep! In the 1680s and 1690s many people left Port Royal and settled other areas.
  3. 3. Louisbourg In 1719 work began on Fortress Louisbourg to protect France’s interests. It was to become one of the busiest ports on the Atlantic coast.
  4. 4. expulsion At the beginning of the French and Indian War of 1754, the British government demanded that Acadians take an oath of allegiance to the Crown that included fighting against the French. Most of them refused. Pressure from the English was strong. British Governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council decided on July 28, 1755 to deport the Acadians.
  5. 5. CAUGHT IN THE MIDDLE Video was not exported from SlideRocket
  6. 6. expulsion
  7. 7. expulsion
  8. 8. Grand Dérangement About 6,000 Acadians were forcibly removed from their colonies on August 11th. The British military ordered the Acadians' communities to be destroyed and homes and barns were burned down. The people were dispersed among the 13 American colonies, but many refused them and sent them on to Europe. Families were torn apart and many lost everything they owned. Acadians call this event the Grand Dérangement, or Great Upheaval. In English it is the Expulsion.
  9. 9. Grand Dérangement
  10. 10. resettlement As a result of the deportation and the subsequent migrations, the Acadians ended up in the New England States and all along the eastern seaboard, as far south as Georgia. Many were put in jail, and many died at sea. Others ran away to Québec, hid with the Mi’kmaqs in Nova Scotia, or went to present-day New Brunswick, or Prince Edward Island.
  11. 11. resettlement The expulsion did not end in 1755. Three years later the Acadians who fled to Île St. Jean (Prince Edward Island) and Île Royale (Cape Breton Island) were rounded up and sent to France. The British under General Wolfe and General Amherst recaptured Louisbourg, the last French stronghold, and deported 3,000 more Acadians to France. The Grand Dérangement displaced from 10,000 to 18,000 Acadians. Thousands more were killed.
  12. 12. ACADIA TODAY 240,000 French speaking people in New Brunswick, 39,500 in Nova Scotia and 6,000 in Prince Edward Island. Others lived in Saint-Pierre and Miquelon, Gaspe, Magdalen Islands, and Newfoundland. Acadia lives on in many small communities spread along throughout the Atlantic region. The nuances in the accents, developed through contacts with other cultures, are noticeable from one area to another, from the Acadian Peninsula in New Brunswick to St. Mary’s Bay in Nova Scotia.
  13. 13. ACADIA TODAY

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