Across2. a deception that allows a person to takeadvantage of certain roles or opportunities fromwhich he or she might be ...
So I don‘t give away the answers
Terms Exam Answers Across              Down   2 passing           1 oppression   3 racism            4 epistle   7 ...
―Passing‖               By Langston Hughes                           On sunny summer Sunday afternoons in Harlem   when...
How to Paraphrase A Paraphrase is a restatement of a passage giving the meaning in another  form. This usually involves e...
Expand what is condensed.  Spell out explicitly what the original implies or conveys by   hints. It follows that a paraph...
 I, Too, Sing America by                    Paraphrased Text  Langston Hughes   I, too, sing America.                 ...
―Passing‖               By Langston Hughes                           On sunny summer Sunday afternoons in Harlem   when...
By Langston Hughes
Discussion Questions             Why does Jack pass? What are the costs of Jack‘s passing?
To Escape Bondage               One extraordinary instance occurred in 1848 when Ellen  Craft—the daughter of a master a...
To Get Information                          of the NAACP, gathered Walter White, working on behalf  facts about lynching...
For Safety                            men raping white Goaded by false stories of Negro  women, a white mob terrorized b...
To advance occupational ambition                              Some passed as white during the workday, while  presenting...
To Pursue Education             Prevented by state law from freeing his  slaves, Michael Healy sent his children to the ...
To get access to services                           racially exclusive To shop, sleep, or eat meals at  establishments ...
To Establish Credibility             Rachel Kennedy passed as white not visually but aurally.When pressed to talk on the...
Curiosity and Fun                St. Clair Drake and Horace R. Cayton report that  some light-skinned Negroes in Chicago...
More Reasons to Pass             The non-fiction literature by and about passers is full of references  to passing as a ...
Distancing oneself from those who might, even           inadvertently, blow one‘s cover.                         Reba Le...
Unsurprisingly, writers of fiction have          been prompted to dramatize this grim                   reality of passing...
All passers suffer the fear of judgment from those from both outside and inside of their primary communities              ...
Being exposed not only ends their situations, it can            have violent consequences.                                ...
More Fears                           Part time passers not only worry about running into someone theyknow, but also makin...
Finally, how does passing change    the perception of African           Americans?              
Does Passing             Reinforce the social   Disrupt the social    construct?            construct?
Reinforcement of Social       Construct            Passing scholar, Leo Spitzer writes that passing was ―by  and large a...
Disruption of Social           Construct               Passing, however, does pose at least some challenge to  racist re...
Source for Facts                 RANDALL KENNEDY Racial Passing OHIO STATE LAW JOURNAL [Vol. 62: 1145 (2001)] This ar...
Tips for Writing the         Narrative Essay                 The first paragraph should be an introduction, clearly tell...
Homework                  Finish Essay One: It is due on Monday, January 23rd Study the new ―Terms List‖ posted on the ...
Ppt january 18th
Ppt january 18th
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Terms exam answers, paraphrasing poetry, "passing" essay and passing theme

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  • Paraphrase the poem: Discuss passing as a themeOther themes?
  • Paraphrase the poem: Discuss passing as a themeOther themes?
  • Ppt january 18th

    1. 1. Across2. a deception that allows a person to takeadvantage of certain roles or opportunities fromwhich he or she might be barred in the absence ofthis posed identity.Down15. Writings in which expression and form, inconnection with ideas and concerns of universaland apparently permanent interest, are essentialfeatures
    2. 2. So I don‘t give away the answers
    3. 3. Terms Exam Answers Across  Down 2 passing  1 oppression 3 racism  4 epistle 7 literal  5 ethnicity 9 antagonist  6 character 10 culture  8 discrimination 11 privilege  13 fluid 12 ambiguity  15 literature 14 situational  18 diversity 16 dialogue  20 bias 17 irony  24 equality 19 power  25 character 21 paraphrase 22 prejudice 23 difference
    4. 4. ―Passing‖ By Langston Hughes  On sunny summer Sunday afternoons in Harlem when the air is one interminable ball game and grandma cannot get her gospel hymns from the Saints of God in Christ on account of the Dodgers on the radio, on sunny Sunday afternoons when the kids look all new and far too clean to stay that way, and Harlem has its washed-and-ironed-and-cleaned-best out, the ones who‘ve crossed the line to live downtown miss you, Harlem of the bitter dream since their dream has come true.
    5. 5. How to Paraphrase A Paraphrase is a restatement of a passage giving the meaning in another form. This usually involves expanding the original text so as to make it clear. A paraphrase will have none of the beauty or effectiveness of the original. It merely aims, in its prosy way, to spell out the literal meaning. It will not substitute for the original, then, but will help us appreciate the compactness and complexity of many poems. Write in prose, not verse (in prose the lines go all the way to right margin). The line breaks of the original are irrelevant in paraphrasing. Write modern prose, rearranging word order and sentence structure as necessary. As far as possible, within the limits of commonsense, avoid using the words of the original. Finding new words to express the meaning is a test of what you are understanding. Write coherent syntax, imitating that of the original if you can do so with ease, otherwise breaking it down into easier sentence forms. Write in the same grammatical person and tense as the original. If the original is in the first person, as many poems are, so must the paraphrase be.
    6. 6. Expand what is condensed.  Spell out explicitly what the original implies or conveys by hints. It follows that a paraphrase will normally be longer than the original.  Spell out explicitly all the possible meanings if the original is ambiguous (saying two or more things at once), as many poems are.  Use square brackets to mark off any additional elements you find it necessary to insert for the coherence of the meaning. The brackets will show that these bits are editorial -- contributed by you for the sake of clarity but not strictly "said" in the original. An example might be some implied transitional phrase or even an implied thought that occurs to the speaker causing a change in tone or feeling.
    7. 7.  I, Too, Sing America by  Paraphrased Text Langston Hughes I, too, sing America.  I am an American. Although the I am the darker brother. color of my skin may be They send me to eat in the kitchen different from yours, I am like When company comes, the rest of my fellowmen. Now I But I laugh, And eat well, am separated from whites, but I And grow strong. [and my people] are gaining strength. Soon, I [we] will join Tomorrow, the rest of America, and my Ill be at the table When company comes. [our] rights will assure us that Nobodyll dare we are not excluded from the Say to me, fruits of the country. My darker "Eat in the kitchen," Then. complexion makes me no less beautiful than everybody Besides, else, which should make whites Theyll see how beautiful I am And be ashamed-- feel sorry for treating me like less than the average individual. I, too, am America. I am like the rest of you.
    8. 8. ―Passing‖ By Langston Hughes  On sunny summer Sunday afternoons in Harlem when the air is one interminable ball game and grandma cannot get her gospel hymns from the Saints of God in Christ on account of the Dodgers on the radio, on sunny Sunday afternoons when the kids look all new and far too clean to stay that way, Take a few minutes and Harlem has its washed-and-ironed-and-cleaned-best out, to paraphrase this the ones who‘ve crossed the line to live downtown poem miss you, Harlem of the bitter dream since their dream has come true.
    9. 9. By Langston Hughes
    10. 10. Discussion Questions  Why does Jack pass? What are the costs of Jack‘s passing?
    11. 11. To Escape Bondage  One extraordinary instance occurred in 1848 when Ellen Craft—the daughter of a master and his slave mistress— escaped from bondage by train, boat, and carriage on a four-day journey from Macon, Georgia, to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[12] Ellen Craft pretended to be white. Her slave husband was part of her disguise; he pretended to be her servant. And there was one more twist: Ellen Craft traveled not as a white woman but as a white man. To obtain freedom for herself and her husband, she temporarily traversed gender as well as racial lines.[13]
    12. 12. To Get Information  of the NAACP, gathered Walter White, working on behalf facts about lynchings and other atrocities and carefully publicized them in an effort to arouse American public opinion. However, the daring way in which he pursued this task brought him close to danger. In 1919, he traveled to Phillips County, Arkansas, to investigate the deaths of some 250 blacks killed in an effort to discourage collective organization by African American cotton farmers. When whites in Phillips County became aware of Whites purpose, he was forced to escape hurriedly. ―You‘re leaving mister, just when the fun is going to start,‖ White recalls being told by the conductor of the train on which he made his getaway. ―A damned yellow nigger is down here passing for white and the boys are going to get him.‖
    13. 13. For Safety  men raping white Goaded by false stories of Negro women, a white mob terrorized blacks in Georgia‘s capital. Caught in town amidst marauding whites, two African Americans escaped serious injury only because of their light skin. They witnessed, however, terrible crimes: ―We saw a lame Negro bootblack . . . pathetically try to outrun a mob of whites. Less than a hundred yards from us the chase ended. We saw clubs and fists descending to the accompaniment of savage shouting and cursing. Suddenly a voice cried, ―There goes another nigger!‖ Its work done, the mob went after new prey. The body with the withered foot lay dead in a pool of blood in the street.
    14. 14. To advance occupational ambition  Some passed as white during the workday, while presenting themselves as African American outside of the workplace. Chronicling this phenomenon in White By Day . . . Negro by Night, a 1952 article in Ebony magazine relates the following story: One girl who passed to get work as a clerk in a Chicago loop department store thought she had lost her job when an old-time, well-meaning friend of her mother came in and said in happy surprise, ―Well, Baby, it sure is good to see this store is finally hiring colored girls.‖ Fortunately she was overheard only by one other clerk who was a liberal and a good friend of the girl who was passing and the secret did not get out.
    15. 15. To Pursue Education  Prevented by state law from freeing his slaves, Michael Healy sent his children to the North where they could be educated and also be free of bondage in the event of their father‘s demise. James Augustine Healy (1830–1900) was a member of the first graduating class of the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. He pursued clerical studies in Canada and France, became a priest in Boston, and served for twenty-five years as the Catholic bishop of Portland, Maine.
    16. 16. To get access to services racially exclusive To shop, sleep, or eat meals at establishments Hospitals were divided into two sections. The white section was clean and renovated; the black section, dirty and dilapidated. The physician took a light-skinned man to the white section of the hospital. Before long, though, a visit by a son-in-law apprized the hospital staff of their ―error.‖ His son wrote that his father ―was snatched from the examination table lest he contaminate the ‗white‘ air, and taken hurriedly across the street in a driving downpour . . . to the ‗Negro‘ ward‖ where he died sixteen days later.
    17. 17. To Establish Credibility  Rachel Kennedy passed as white not visually but aurally.When pressed to talk on the telephone with some authorityon an important matter—a consumer complaint, dealingwith police, seeking employment or educationalopportunities—she would adopt an accent that mostlisteners would associate with the speech of a white person.She put on countless stellar performances before anappreciative household audience that viewed these affairs ascomical episodes in the American racial tragedy.
    18. 18. Curiosity and Fun  St. Clair Drake and Horace R. Cayton report that some light-skinned Negroes in Chicago they interviewed in the forties spoke of going to white establishments ―just to see what they are like and to get a thrill.‖
    19. 19. More Reasons to Pass  The non-fiction literature by and about passers is full of references to passing as a mode of resistance or subversion. Ray Stannard Baker noted that passing awakened glee among many Negroes because they viewed it as a way of ―getting even with the dominant white man.‖ Langston Hughes repeatedly defended passing as a joke on racism. Gregory Howard Williams relates that his father derived great psychic satisfaction by defying the rules of segregation when he lived in Virginia as the husband of a white woman and the President of a (supposedly) lily-white chapter of the American Legion. Williams also relates that his brother got a thrill from romancing white girls who would surely have spurned him had they perceived him to be a Negro.
    20. 20. Distancing oneself from those who might, even inadvertently, blow one‘s cover. Reba Lee told her white husband and in-laws that her parents were dead and said nothing to her parents about her marriage or pregnancy (until she decided to stop passing). In New England in the 1940s, a Negro physician would periodically meet with black colleagues but only at a distance safely removed from the town where he was assumed to be white. In the 1950s Buster Williams permitted his mother (Gregory Howard Williams‘s grandmother) to stay in his ―white‖ household in Virginia, but only on condition that she pretend to be an employee.
    21. 21. Unsurprisingly, writers of fiction have been prompted to dramatize this grim reality of passing. In Jessie Redmond Fauset‘s Plum Bun: A Novel Without a Moral, a sister deniesrecognition to her own sibling.[106] In Fauset‘s novel Comedy, American Style, amother pretends that her son is her butler.In Langston Hughes‘s short story Passing, a son denies his Mother. In Sutton Grigg‘s The Hindered Hand and Walter White‘s Flight,] parents exilechildren whose dark-skins will reveal the parents‘ racial masquerade. In Johnson‘s Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, the protagonist pretends that anold friend is a stranger.
    22. 22. All passers suffer the fear of judgment from those from both outside and inside of their primary communities In the novel, The Garies and their friends, Frank Web tells the storyof Clarence, who is revealed as a passer. Clarence‘s fiancee breaksoff their engagement, blighting ―his greatest hope in life.‖Furthermore, he finds himself to be almost completely isolated.―[H]e was avoided by his former friends and sneered at as a‗nigger.‘‖ At the same time, ―he felt ashamed to seek the society ofcoloured men now that the whites despised and rejected him.‖―[O]h! Em[ily,]‖ he writes to his sister, soon before he dies of abroken heart, ―if my lot had only been cast with yours—had wenever been separated—I might have been today as happy as youare.‖
    23. 23. Being exposed not only ends their situations, it can have violent consequences. Louise Burleigh wrote (but did not publish) a short story, DarkCloud, that vividly captures the sense of dread with which she and hercolleagues viewed the possibility of miscegenation betweenunsuspecting whites and villainous passing Negroes. In Burleigh‘stale, a white New England woman named Alicia Fairchild travels southwith her daughter where she attends her mother-in-law‘s funeral.During the ceremony she realizes that her husband‘s mother was blackand that, therefore, he is black. Feeling defiled, the victim of a deceptionshe perceives as akin to rape, Fairchild destroys her family. She kills herhusband. But more significantly, she also kills her daughter bypermitting the toddler to be consumed byfire inside of a locked church.[57]
    24. 24. More Fears Part time passers not only worry about running into someone theyknow, but also making the mistake of revealing details about their otherlives.Passers fear situations where they must participate in prejudice or bias inorder to keep up appearances.Passers fear producing offspring that will betray their race:In Fannie Hurst‘s Imitation of Life, a passing Negro woman sterilizes herself toguarantee that no dark baby will reveal her hidden ancestry to a white husbandwho believes that she is white.
    25. 25. Finally, how does passing change the perception of African Americans? 
    26. 26. Does Passing Reinforce the social Disrupt the social construct? construct?
    27. 27. Reinforcement of Social Construct  Passing scholar, Leo Spitzer writes that passing was ―by and large a personal solution to discrimination and exclusion. It was an action that, when accomplished successfully, generally divorced its individual practitioners from others in the subordinated group, and in no way challenged the ideology of racism or the system in which it was rooted. Indeed, because individuals responding to marginality through . . . passing could be viewed as either conscious or unwitting accomplices in their own victimization—as persons consenting to the continuing maintenance of existing inequalities and exclusionary ideologies—it is certainly understandable why they often elicited such scathing criticism from their contemporaries.‖
    28. 28. Disruption of Social Construct  Passing, however, does pose at least some challenge to racist regimes. That is why they typically try to prevent it. Fleeing bondage by passing may have been an individualistic response to the tyranny of slavery but it did free human beings and helped to belie the canard that slaves were actually content with their lot. The successful performance of ―white man‘s work‖ by a passing Negro upset racist claims that blacks are categorically incapable of doing such work. The extent of the disturbance is severely limited by the practical necessity of keeping the passing secret. But under some circumstances a limited disturbance is about all that can be accomplished.
    29. 29. Source for Facts  RANDALL KENNEDY Racial Passing OHIO STATE LAW JOURNAL [Vol. 62: 1145 (2001)] This article is posted on our website under ―Secondary Sources‖
    30. 30. Tips for Writing the Narrative Essay  The first paragraph should be an introduction, clearly telling the reader what kind of narrative it is – an event, an experience, or an observation. Provide plenty of description of people and places. While giving the details, anecdotes should be included-use dialogue to ―Show‖ the scene. The event, experience, or observation should be recreated in such a way that the reader feels involved. The verbs and modifiers used should be vivid and precise. It should include all the conventions of a story – plot, setting, characters, climax, and an ending. The essay should be well organized with the events described as they happened in time. The essay should include a reflection on the larger meaning or importance of the ―story.‖
    31. 31. Homework  Finish Essay One: It is due on Monday, January 23rd Study the new ―Terms List‖ posted on the website Read Langston Hughes‘s ―Who‘s Passing for Who‖ Respond to the Blog Prompt (about ―Who‘s Passing for Who‖) I will post tomorrow.

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