CLASS 7EWRT 1B
AGENDA Presentation: Terms List 2    QHQ Discussion: Whos Passing for Who? and    "Recitatif"   Lecture: Thesis stateme...
TERMS LIST 2 Ableism: A pervasive system of discrimination and exclusion that   oppresses people who have mental, emotion...
 Classism: Bias based on social or economic class. Critical Consciousness: a process of continuous self-reflection and a...
QHQ Discussion: "Recitatif" Between Roberta and Twyla, who is white and who is black? Does the article/narrative show ho...
“Who’s Passing for Who?”By Langston Hughes •   Who’s really passing in the story here? •   Were the light-skinned couple ...
“Who’s Passing for Who?”By Langston Hughes •   Why was Caleb so nice to the “overearnest uplifters?” •   Why did the writ...
Comparing Works We Have Read  What does “Who’s Passing for Who?” have in common    with Morrison’s “Recitatif”?  What do...
Writing The Essay#2
The Prompt:If passing for white will get a fellow better accommodations on the train, better seatsin the theatre, immunity...
Your ThesisIn this case, your thesis will be your positionon William Pickens’s Statement: Do you agreewith him or not? Why...
What are your “reasons” for agreeing or disagreeing with the act of passing? Your reasonsshould connect to your thesis. Ea...
IntroductionsYou never get a second chance to make a first impression. Theopening paragraph of your paper will provide you...
Start by thinking about the        question you are trying to answer:Write an essay of 500 to 750 words arguing for or aga...
Open with an attention grabber. Consider                          these options:• A provocative quotation: Consider a line...
       Avoid statements like "In this paper, I will argue    that racial passing destabilizes the social construction    ...
Introductions to Avoid1. The restated question introduction: Twists the question to take up space in the   introduction.2....
Let’s Try to Write an Introduction or Two Now. An intriguing example of         A vivid and perhaps   passing: Provide a...
Possible OutlineIntroduction:Thesis: This will likely be near the end of your introductionMultiple Body Paragraphs support...
WritingSketch out a rough outline.Intro: What kind?Thesis: Write out a working thesisBody 1: One of your strongest argumen...
HOMEWORK Reading: Begin Stone Butch Blues (1-50)   Writing: Post Draft: Introduction, Thesis, Minimum   three body paragr...
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Class 7 1 b

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Class 7 1 b

  1. 1. CLASS 7EWRT 1B
  2. 2. AGENDA Presentation: Terms List 2 QHQ Discussion: Whos Passing for Who? and "Recitatif" Lecture: Thesis statements, outlining, using evidence, introductions. In-Class Writing: Essay #2 Author Lecture: Leslie Feinberg Return Essay #1
  3. 3. TERMS LIST 2 Ableism: A pervasive system of discrimination and exclusion that oppresses people who have mental, emotional, and physical disabilities. Ally: A person who supports marginalized, silenced, or less privilege groups without actually being a member of those groups. This person will often directly confront and challenge biphobia, homophobia, heterosexism, racism, transphobia and other systems of oppression. Binary Gender: A system that defines and makes room for two and only two distinct, natural and opposite genders (i.e. male and female). These two genders are defined in opposition to each other, such that masculinity and femininity are seen as mutually exclusive. In this system, there is no room for any ambiguity or intermingling of gender traits.
  4. 4.  Classism: Bias based on social or economic class. Critical Consciousness: a process of continuous self-reflection and action to discover and uncover how we continue to be shaped by societal assumptions and power dynamics: an essential tool to help us to recognize, understand and work to change the social forces that shape our societies an ourselves. Cultural Appropriation: The adoption of cultural elements not in one’s own culture, without full knowledge of or respect for its value within the original culture. Cultural Oppression: Social norms, roles, rituals, language, music, and art that reflect and reinforce the belief that one social group is superior to anther. Dominance: The systematic attitudes and actions of prejudice, superiority, and self- righteousness of one group (a non-target group) in relation to another (a target group). Internalized dominance includes the inability of a group or individual to see privilege as a member of the non-target group.
  5. 5. QHQ Discussion: "Recitatif" Between Roberta and Twyla, who is white and who is black? Does the article/narrative show how stereotypes can emerge unconsciously? Does it matter what races the characters belong to? Should we try to understand their personal and cultural background as opposed to color?
  6. 6. “Who’s Passing for Who?”By Langston Hughes • Who’s really passing in the story here? • Were the light-skinned couple white or African American? • Can the writers be mad that the Iowans pretended to pass? • What did the narrator mean when he said “they had too much fun at our expense- even If they did pay for all the drinks.” • Why do the Iowans pretend to be African American? • Was the red-headed man from Iowa passing? • How are the couple able to pass so easily as black, so much so that a group of black people are completely convinced that they are? • Who was narrow minded?
  7. 7. “Who’s Passing for Who?”By Langston Hughes • Why was Caleb so nice to the “overearnest uplifters?” • Why did the writers hate on Caleb so much? • Why were the white friends of Caleb’s so surprised about black writers? • How does Caleb seem contradictory after he and his group was kicked out of the restaurant for “disturbing the peace”? • Why are the black men so rude to the couple and the red-haired man in the beginning? • Why does the red-haired Iowan care about the unknown woman? • Are Hughes and his friends being hypocritical when they tell the Iowan that he shouldn’t stop protecting a woman just because of her race? • Is Hughes’ bias any worse/better than the man from Iowa? • Why did the red haired man leave the group after the group was told to leave the bar? • Why would the woman who appeared white be so okay with being pushed down by her husband? •
  8. 8. Comparing Works We Have Read  What does “Who’s Passing for Who?” have in common with Morrison’s “Recitatif”?  What do they share with other works? How are they different?  “Passing” the poem  “Passing” the short story  “The Passing of Grandison”  Do you have any other insights into “passing” that you have realized through our readings or discussions.
  9. 9. Writing The Essay#2
  10. 10. The Prompt:If passing for white will get a fellow better accommodations on the train, better seatsin the theatre, immunity from insults in public places, and may even save his life froma mob,” only idiots would fail to seize the advantages of passing, at least occasionally ifnot permanently.”Write an essay of 750 to 1000 words arguing for or against William Pickens’sstatement. Use support from the texts you have read so far, our discussions, and yourown insights. Do you agree with Pickenss statement? If yes, why? If no, why not?
  11. 11. Your ThesisIn this case, your thesis will be your positionon William Pickens’s Statement: Do you agreewith him or not? Why or why not? You mayrefer to Pickens or not in your thesis.
  12. 12. What are your “reasons” for agreeing or disagreeing with the act of passing? Your reasonsshould connect to your thesis. Each one should be a topic for at least one body paragraph  Consider your best support for your assertion. This will likely be from your brainstorming using FREECASH.  Find textual evidence to support your position.  Explain how your examples support your thesis.  You can also use secondary sources if you would like to, but they are not necessary for this paper.
  13. 13. IntroductionsYou never get a second chance to make a first impression. Theopening paragraph of your paper will provide your readers withtheir initial impressions of your argument, your writing style, andthe overall quality of your work. A vague, disorganized, error-filled, off-the-wall, or boring introduction will probably create anegative impression. On the other hand, a concise, engaging, andwell-written introduction will start your readers off thinking highlyof you, your analytical skills, your writing, and your paper.
  14. 14. Start by thinking about the question you are trying to answer:Write an essay of 500 to 750 words arguing for or against William Pickens’s statement:"If passing for white will get a fellow better accommodations on the train, better seats in thetheatre, immunity from insults in public places, and may even save his life from a mob," wroteWilliam Pickens, "only idiots would fail to seize the advantages of passing, at least occasionally ifnot permanently"Your entire essay will be a response to this question, and your introduction is the first step towardthat end. Your direct answer to the assigned question will be your thesis, and your thesis will beincluded in your introduction, so it is a good idea to use the question as a jumping off point.
  15. 15. Open with an attention grabber. Consider these options:• A provocative quotation: Consider a line or two from one of the texts we read.• An intriguing example of passing: Provide a situation or two in which a person might be inclined to pass.• A puzzling scenario: Imagine a scene that makes a reader consider the consequences or benefits of passing.• A vivid and perhaps unexpected anecdote: Open with a short story about a successful or failed passing attempt.• Find common ground with your reader: Offer a contemporary example of passing (maybe a humorous one, even) and then explain the more reasons for passing in this earlier time period.
  16. 16.  Avoid statements like "In this paper, I will argue that racial passing destabilizes the social construction of race and is therefore beneficial to society." While this sentence points toward your main argument, it isnt especially interesting. It might be more effective to say what you mean in a declarative sentence: “Racial passing destabilizes the social construction of race and is therefore beneficial to society." It is much more convincing to tell your readers that than to tell them that you are going to say that it does. Assert your main argument confidently. After all, you cant expect your reader to believe it if it doesnt sound like you believe it!
  17. 17. Introductions to Avoid1. The restated question introduction: Twists the question to take up space in the introduction.2. The place holder introduction: Offers several vague sentences that don’t really say much.3. The Websters Dictionary introduction. This introduction begins by giving the dictionary definition of one or more of the words in the assigned question.4. The "dawn of man" introduction. This kind of introduction generally makes broad, sweeping statements about the relevance of this topic since the beginning of time.5. The book report introduction. This introduction gives the name and author of the book you are writing about, tells what the book is about, and offers other basic facts about the book.
  18. 18. Let’s Try to Write an Introduction or Two Now. An intriguing example of  A vivid and perhaps passing: Provide a situation unexpected anecdote: Open or two in which a person with a short story about a might be inclined to pass. successful or failed passing attempt. A provocative quotation: Consider a line or two from  Find common ground with one of the texts we read. your reader: Offer a contemporary example of A puzzling scenario: Imagine passing (maybe a humorous a scene that makes a reader one, even) and then explain consider the consequences the more reasons for passing or benefits of passing. in this earlier time period.
  19. 19. Possible OutlineIntroduction:Thesis: This will likely be near the end of your introductionMultiple Body Paragraphs supporting your thesis: The topic sentences of your body paragraphs(probably situated fairly early in the paragraph) should connect directly to your thesis. You should use thefollowing rhetorical strategies to support your topic sentence: define (describe and/or characterize unfamiliar terms, situations, or events) classify (briefly distinguish between types) exemplify (provide examples from primary or secondary texts) analyze (explore and/or evaluate, particularly in terms of the connections of the examples to your reasons or thesis) explain (give details about) the connection between your example and your assertions. conclude (provide a logical conclusion for your readers) Transition (prepare your reader for the next paragraph.Counter Argument: Anticipate your readers questions or doubts. Will will discuss this in class onWednesday.Conclusion: We will discuss this in class Wednesday
  20. 20. WritingSketch out a rough outline.Intro: What kind?Thesis: Write out a working thesisBody 1: One of your strongest arguments supporting your thesis. support/exampleBody 2: Another reason support/exampleBody 3: Another reason support/exampleBody 4:One of your strongest arguments supporting your thesis. support/exampleCounterargument:Conclusion:
  21. 21. HOMEWORK Reading: Begin Stone Butch Blues (1-50) Writing: Post Draft: Introduction, Thesis, Minimum three body paragraphs (with topic sentences, evidence, and explanation) Studying: Vocab/Terms

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