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Personal Branding                                                                                                 Ref: 009...
Personal Branding                                                                                                 Ref: 009...
Personal Branding                                                                                                 Ref: 009...
Personal Branding                                                                                                 Ref: 009...
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Redmond sets a classic tone at echo entertainment why it shows he loves his staff

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Redmond sets a classic tone at echo entertainment why it shows he loves his staff

  1. 1. Personal Branding Ref: 0092Redmond sets a classic tone at EchoEntertainment: Why it shows he “loveshis staff”By Myriam Robin | 13 December 2012Casino operator Echo Entertainment Group has a new CEO, and he says he’snothing like the last one.Larry Mullin, who left the CEO role in controversial circumstances last September,has been replaced by the corporate conservative, John Redmond, who previouslysat on Echo’s board.A veteran American casino operator who began his executive career in finance,Redmond has made it clear he won’t be repeating Mullin’s signature jeans-and-shirtlook (a look that would not have allowed him past the bouncers in most VIP rooms atEcho’s Star Casino).“I have always felt that the tone you set at the top of the organisation establishes theculture and what is acceptable in terms of performance,” Redmond told TheAustralian Financial Review.“When I walk the casino floor, for example, I have my jacket buttoned, so everyonelooks and thinks ‘I better button my jacket’. That is an example of setting that visualtone.” For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9824 0420 E: info@imagegroup.com.au www.imagegroup.com.au ©2012 Page 1 of 4
  2. 2. Personal Branding Ref: 0092Redmond, who the AFR says told chairman John O’Neill that Mullin wasn’t “CEOmaterial” in September, is happy to note the contrast between himself and hispredecessor.“Put us next to each other, [and] just visually, Larry Mullin is a very casual person,”Redmond says. Coming on top of his statements about top buttons and all that, it’sclear he doesn’t approve.June Dally-Watkins, Australia’s doyen of business etiquette who for the past 60years has run a corporate finishing school, applauds Redmond’s view.“I believe he’s absolutely correct,” she tells LeadingCompany. “He must set a toneand an image.”“There have to be rules and standards.“I think the fact that this new CEO is getting tough with his staff means he loves themand cares about them. Every human being needs to be encouraged to have a highstandard. Anyone can be low, uncaring, cheap and vulgar.”Career coach and human resources expert Kelly Magowan says leaders certainly setthe tone with regard to attire. “If they’re more casual, so is everyone else, and viceversa.”Magowan says she thinks it’s important to have a dress code and stick to it inprofessional environments. For client-facing roles, like those working at a casinofrequented by high rollers, the dress code should be more formal.“First impressions do count, and there’s lots of psychology around that,” she says“You can only create a first impression once,” she says.“If you’re in client-facing role, there is a perception around your services. If you’re aconsulting company and you’re charging a fortune, and your consultants are goingout representing your company while dressed casually, of course that would create ahorrible impression.”Image consultant and former fashion designer Jon Michail says technology firmshave inspired a casual-corporate look since the 1980s. But he stresses it’s not a lookthat works for most businesses.“Historically these companies didn’t deal with people, but with technology. So theycould let loose on those things. But if your business deals with human beings, if you For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9824 0420 E: info@imagegroup.com.au www.imagegroup.com.au ©2012 Page 2 of 4
  3. 3. Personal Branding Ref: 0092look down-and-out, that’s how you message. If you’re really talented you’ll overcomethat, but you create hurdles for yourself.”As the casualization of the workforce began in the 1980s, when staff began doingshorter stints in each job, many leaders have forgotten their role in setting the tone ofthe office,Michail says. “Leaders have lost sense of what true leadership’s all about, and havestarted presenting down-and-out.“You could do that when things were booming. But you’ve got an American[Redmond] coming from an American economy in serious trouble. They know wherestrategic, powerful, influential leadership is important, [and] looking down-and-out willnot do that. Presenting influence, power and success also means the visual aspect.”The ideal corporate attire, Magowan says, is neutral. It looks polished and tasteful,but should fade into the background, letting people focus on other things wheninteracting with you. “It should be just another uniform,” she says.Dally-Watkins says this is forgotten by too many people, especially young ones, andis hamstringing their careers.“Your clothes should match. You should dress correctly. It makes you look important.And it makes your staff look important and proud because they represent themselveswell.”“Somebody has to lift up the image of young people because I am appalled. I’ve justbeen around to my students – they’re wearing short skirts whether their legs are uglyor not. They’re wearing dresses that show their bosoms. The magazines arepromoting it. Shoes, stiletto heels with high soles, they’re ugly and damaging to thehealth of their legs, and they can’t walk in them and they’re too flashy.“Everyone should be looking at your lovely face, not your shoes.”In many business situations, traditional corporate attire (buttoned-up suits, clean-shaven faces for the men and high heels for the women) isn’t the done thing. Dally-Watkins says while clothes should be conservative and flattering, they should alsobe in keeping with the culture.“There are some businesses that are very casual, and in the suburbs. In thoseworkplaces you shouldn’t overdo it. You should dress accordingly because thatshows intelligence.” For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9824 0420 E: info@imagegroup.com.au www.imagegroup.com.au ©2012 Page 3 of 4
  4. 4. Personal Branding Ref: 0092Magowan says dressing different for work is useful for psychologically preparingpeople for the day. “There’s always been a separation between work and home,” shesays.“Even in information technology environments, for instance, where there’s a morecasual dress code, it’s still a dress code. There’s still that group mentality aspect,there’s still that tradition and sense of corporate identity and so on.”Though most businesses will develop an unspoken standard naturally, informed byhow senior leaders dress, sometimes things can go wrong when this standard isn’twritten down.“If you have no policy around code of behaviour or presentation, then people can goawry,” Magowan says. “Most people do the right thing. Obviously it’s common sense,but it’s worth having a formal statement in place because there’s a percentage of thepopulation who won’t do it unasked.” For further information on this handout and the consulting and coaching programs available please contact: Image Group International Asia Pacific Head Office T: (+61 3) 9824 0420 E: info@imagegroup.com.au www.imagegroup.com.au ©2012 Page 4 of 4

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