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New Copyright and Ethics 2013

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Slides from the ActivEd workshop. More about the International Project can be found at http://activedbootcamp.wordpress.com/

Slides from the ActivEd workshop. More about the International Project can be found at http://activedbootcamp.wordpress.com/

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New Copyright and Ethics 2013

  1. 1. Copyright, ethics and morality of your work Jon Audain University of Winchester
  2. 2. Discussion Are any of the following photographs allowed under copyright? Can I place them on my own web page?
  3. 3. What is copyright? • Literally means the right to copy something that is made.
  4. 4. Real life copyright - an author's time
  5. 5. Copyright royalties £20.00 - 6% = £1.20 €23.42 - 6% = €1.41
  6. 6. Copyright law originated in the United Kingdom from a concept of common law; the Statute of Anne 1709. It became statutory with the passing of the Copyright Act 1911. The current act is the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.
  7. 7. Is it all about copyright? • Not at all. Copyright is one part of what needs to be considered when content is created. Content created Copyright Moral rights Integrity Falsely Paternity (derogation) Privacy (distortion) attributed
  8. 8. So what 'stuff' can be protected by copyright? • Music,film & video • Literary or • Magazine • Images dramatic s & type • Digital Apps & software
  9. 9. Copyright is an automatic right and arises whenever an individual or company creates a work. To qualify, a work should be regarded as original, and exhibit a degree of labour, skill or judgement.
  10. 10. Interpretation is related to the independent creation rather than the idea behind the creation. For example, your idea for a book would not itself be protected, but the actual content of a book you write would be. In other words, someone else is still entitled to write their own book around the same idea, provided they do not directly copy or adapt yours to do so.
  11. 11. • The law gives the creators of literary, dramatic, musical, artistic works, sound recordings, broadcasts, films and typographical arrangement of published editions, rights to control the ways in which their material may be used. • The rights cover; broadcast and public performance, copying, adapting, issuing, renting and lending copies to the public. • In many cases, the creator will also have the right to be identified as the author and to object to distortions of his work. • International conventions give protection in most countries, subject to national laws.
  12. 12. Artistic Literary - song lyrics, • photography, painting, Musical - recordings manuscripts, manuals, sculptures, and score. computer programs, architecture, technical commercial drawings/diagrams, Sound recording - may documents, leaflets, maps, logos. be recordings of other newsletters & articles copyright works, e.g. etc. • Typographical musical and literary. arrangement of Dramatic - plays, published editions Films - broadcasts and dance, etc. cable programmes. • magazines, periodicals, etc.
  13. 13. Image: Grant Cochrane / FreeDigitalPhotos.net Copyright is like making a sandwich .......you need to separate the different parts so it's not so much of a muddle
  14. 14. Doodalally
  15. 15. Literary - song lyrics, manuscripts, manuals, computer programs, commerci al documents, leaflets, newsletters & articles etc. Dramatic - plays, dance, etc. 70 For literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works 70 years from the end of the calendar year in which the last remaining author of the work dies.
  16. 16. • Names, titles, short phrases and colours are not generally considered unique or substantial enough to be covered, but a creation, such as a logo, that combines these elements may be. Back to the future
  17. 17. Literary - song lyrics, Artistic Musical - recordings manuscripts, and score. manuals, computer • photography, painting, programs, sculptures, Sound recording - may commercial architecture, technical be recordings of other documents, leaflets, drawings/diagrams, copyright works, e.g. newsletters & articles maps, logos. musical and literary. etc. • Typographical Films - broadcasts and Dramatic - plays, arrangement of cable programmes. dance, etc. published editions • magazines, 70 50 periodicals, etc. For literary, dramatic, musical or artistic works 70 years from the end of the 70/25 calendar year in which the last remaining author of the work dies.
  18. 18. Crown Copyright • Crown copyright will exist in works made by an officer of the Crown, this includes items such as legislation and documents and reports produced by government bodies. • Crown Copyright will last for a period of 125 years from the end of the calendar year in which the work was made. 125
  19. 19. Parliamentary Copyright • Parliamentary Copyright will apply to work that is made by or under the direction or control of the House of Commons or the House of Lords and will last until 50 years from the end of the calendar year in which the work was made. 50 Image: Jon Whiles / FreeDigitalPhotos.net
  20. 20. What you can not do • It is an offence to perform any of the following acts without the consent of the owner: • Copy the work. • Rent, lend or issue copies of the work to the public. • Perform, broadcast or show the work in public. • Adapt the work. • The author of a work, or a director of a film may also have certain moral rights: • The right to be identified as the author. • Right to object to derogatory treatment.
  21. 21. Is it all about copyright? • Not at all. Copyright is one part of what needs to be considered when content is created. Content created Copyright Moral rights Integrity Falsely Paternity (derogation) Privacy (distortion) attributed
  22. 22. Breaches of copyright
  23. 23. Breaches of copyright • Not acknowledging where there original Paternity source came from and who is the rightful owner. Integrity • Changing the work in any way as it was (derogation) originally intended. Mash up, digital, etc (distortion) • Not acknowledging the original author and Falsely half crediting or not crediting properly attributed • Taking content or other information about Privacy the author connected to the copyright and using it when asked specifically not to.
  24. 24. http://www.everythingisaremix.info/watch-the-series/
  25. 25. Just like any other asset, copyright may be transferred or sold by the copyright owner to another party. Rights cannot be claimed for any part of a work which is a copy taken from a previous work. For example, in a piece of music featuring samples from a previous work, the copyright of the samples would still remain with the original author. Only the owner, or his exclusive licensee can bring proceedings in the courts.
  26. 26. Plagiarism and copyright infringement How does this affect copyright?
  27. 27. Copyright Infringement • Copyright infringement is using someone else's work without getting that person's permission. • The author of any original work, including books, essays, Webpages, songs, pictures, and videos, automatically gets the copyright to that work, even if she doesn't label it with the copyright symbol and her name. • The work must be fixed in form tangible, which means it must be stored on something physical, such as paper, canvas, a CD, or a hard disk. Taken from www.plagiarismchecker.com
  28. 28. Copyright Infringement • The owner of a copyright gets to decide who can legally make copies of that work. • It is illegal to copy large sections of someone else's copyrighted work without permission,even if you give the original author credit. • Imagine someone making copies of the movie Finding Nemo without asking for permission. I'm sure you won't get away with it just by giving the authors credit on the DVD cover! Taken from www.plagiarismchecker.com
  29. 29. The rules What you can do and what you can not do
  30. 30. Fair usage of copyright • Fair usage is a term used to describe what and how much is reasonable to use of an author's work.
  31. 31. What counts as fair usage? • Private and research study • Acts for the purposes of royal purposes. commissions, statutory enquiries, judicial proceedings and parliamentary purposes. • Performance, copies or lending for educational • Recording of broadcasts for the purposes purposes. of listening to or viewing at a more convenient time, this is known as time • Criticism and news reporting. shifting. • Incidental inclusion. • Producing a back up copy for personal use of a computer program. • Copies and lending by librarians. • Playing sound recording for a non profit making organisation, club or society. • (Profit making organisations and individuals should obtain a license from PRS for Music.)
  32. 32. Audio Network
  33. 33. Protecting your work and sharing
  34. 34. Creative commons
  35. 35. How does it work?
  36. 36. Getting your license
  37. 37. Directed reading
  38. 38. Copyright, ethics and morality of your work Jon Audain University of Winchester

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