Planning with the
End in Mind:
Approaches to
Summative
Assessment
Presented by: Jonathan Vervaet
“If students have not been told
where they are going, it is
unlikely that they will arrive.”
– Shirley Clark
Learning Intentions
“I can find evidence of current
assessment and curriculum
design research in my current
practice.”
Learning Intentions
“I can become curious about
something in the research I
want to inquire further into.”
Carol Dweck (2006)
Csikzentmihalyi (1990)

Flow Theory – The
exhilarating moments when
we feel in control, full of
purpose, and in the zone.
Csikzentmihalyi (1990)

Challenge
Level
Skill Level
Formative
Assessment for Learning
Ongoing
To determine learning
needs

Ungraded and Descriptive
Feedback (uses words)
Prov...
Formative Assessment:

5 Key Strategies…
sometimes 6!
Dylan Wiliam “Embedded Formative
Assessment” (2011)
Formative Assessment:
1.Learning Intentions and Success
Criteria
2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence
of Learning
3.Fe...
Learning Intentions:
What are we
learning?
Vs.
Learning Activities:
What are we doing?
Success Criteria
and the Use of
Performance
Standards
Formative Assessment:
1.Learning Intentions and Success
Criteria
2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence
of Learning
3.Fe...
Determine
Acceptable Evidence
Performance
Tasks
Formative Assessment:
1.Learning Intentions and Success
Criteria
2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence
of Learning
3.Fe...
Constantly weighing the pig
won’t make it fatter...

The Benefits of Formative Assessment
Striking a New Balance: How can teachers
increase their use of formative assessment and
decrease their use of summative as...
The Latin root word for assessment is
"assidere" which means to sit beside.
Formative Assessment:
1.Learning Intentions and Success
Criteria
2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence
of Learning
3.Fe...
“Covering”
Curriculum
The Prescribed
Learning Outcomes
are the goals, not
content coverage.
Use the textbook as a
resource, not the
syllabus.
Summative Assessme
Summative Assessment Activities

- Students demonstrate knowledge /
skills on which they have had
opportunity to practice
...
Triangulation of Data
Damien Cooper, Talk About Assessment
Performance Task, Oral Conference,
Written Test Data
Authentic Tasks =
What Big People Do
Grant Wiggins
Formative (for)

Examples:
-Oral questioning

Summative (of)

Examples:
-Inquiry projects

-Draft work

-Presentations

-R...
Communicating Student
Learning (Reporting)
• Shift from “reporting” to “communicating
student learning”
• Report on core competencies and key areas
of learning
• Foc...
• Use clear performance standards-based
language
• Move toward meaningful
descriptions/collections/demonstrations of
stude...
"We must constantly remind
ourselves that the ultimate
purpose of evaluation is to
have students become self
evaluating. I...
“We know that sustained, collaborative,
inquiry based professional development
can help teachers develop new
understanding...
Grade wide, interdisciplinary teaching
teams working on shared goals can make
a significant difference in student
learning...
Grading Practices That
Support Learning…

Teachers and
departments have a
shared understanding
or definition of each
grade...
Contact Information

Jonathan Vervaet
Email: jonathanvervaet@gmail.com
or
Twitter: @jonathanvervaet
Planning With the End in Mind: Approaches to Summative Assessment
Planning With the End in Mind: Approaches to Summative Assessment
Planning With the End in Mind: Approaches to Summative Assessment
Planning With the End in Mind: Approaches to Summative Assessment
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Planning With the End in Mind: Approaches to Summative Assessment

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Port Moody Secondary School, November 22nd, 2013

Published in: Education, Technology
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Planning With the End in Mind: Approaches to Summative Assessment

  1. 1. Planning with the End in Mind: Approaches to Summative Assessment Presented by: Jonathan Vervaet
  2. 2. “If students have not been told where they are going, it is unlikely that they will arrive.” – Shirley Clark
  3. 3. Learning Intentions “I can find evidence of current assessment and curriculum design research in my current practice.”
  4. 4. Learning Intentions “I can become curious about something in the research I want to inquire further into.”
  5. 5. Carol Dweck (2006)
  6. 6. Csikzentmihalyi (1990) Flow Theory – The exhilarating moments when we feel in control, full of purpose, and in the zone.
  7. 7. Csikzentmihalyi (1990) Challenge Level Skill Level
  8. 8. Formative Assessment for Learning Ongoing To determine learning needs Ungraded and Descriptive Feedback (uses words) Provides feedback to students and teacher to promote learning Summative Assessment of Learning Occurs at the end of a learning progression Graded to determine achievement level and for reporting Evaluative Levels or Marks
  9. 9. Formative Assessment: 5 Key Strategies… sometimes 6! Dylan Wiliam “Embedded Formative Assessment” (2011)
  10. 10. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
  11. 11. Learning Intentions: What are we learning? Vs. Learning Activities: What are we doing?
  12. 12. Success Criteria and the Use of Performance Standards
  13. 13. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
  14. 14. Determine Acceptable Evidence
  15. 15. Performance Tasks
  16. 16. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
  17. 17. Constantly weighing the pig won’t make it fatter... The Benefits of Formative Assessment
  18. 18. Striking a New Balance: How can teachers increase their use of formative assessment and decrease their use of summative assessment?
  19. 19. The Latin root word for assessment is "assidere" which means to sit beside.
  20. 20. Formative Assessment: 1.Learning Intentions and Success Criteria 2.Activities Designed to Elicit Evidence of Learning 3.Feedback that Moves Learning Forward 4.Peer Assessment 5.Student Ownership of Learning
  21. 21. “Covering” Curriculum
  22. 22. The Prescribed Learning Outcomes are the goals, not content coverage. Use the textbook as a resource, not the syllabus.
  23. 23. Summative Assessme
  24. 24. Summative Assessment Activities - Students demonstrate knowledge / skills on which they have had opportunity to practice - Are based on known criteria - Focus primarily on individual student performance - Usually broader – integrate important skills and knowledge - Inform report cards Ken O’Connor, How to Grade for Learning
  25. 25. Triangulation of Data Damien Cooper, Talk About Assessment
  26. 26. Performance Task, Oral Conference, Written Test Data
  27. 27. Authentic Tasks = What Big People Do Grant Wiggins
  28. 28. Formative (for) Examples: -Oral questioning Summative (of) Examples: -Inquiry projects -Draft work -Presentations -Reflections -Grade conferences -Portfolio reviews -Peer /self assessments -Portfolio reviews -Tests and quizzes
  29. 29. Communicating Student Learning (Reporting)
  30. 30. • Shift from “reporting” to “communicating student learning” • Report on core competencies and key areas of learning • Focus on learning standards (curricular competencies and content/concepts) in areas of learning (subjects)
  31. 31. • Use clear performance standards-based language • Move toward meaningful descriptions/collections/demonstrations of student learning
  32. 32. "We must constantly remind ourselves that the ultimate purpose of evaluation is to have students become self evaluating. If students graduate from our schools still dependent upon others to tell them when they are adequate, good, or excellent, then we’ve missed the whole point of what education is about.” - Costa and Kallick (1992)
  33. 33. “We know that sustained, collaborative, inquiry based professional development can help teachers develop new understandings and approaches.”
  34. 34. Grade wide, interdisciplinary teaching teams working on shared goals can make a significant difference in student learning.
  35. 35. Grading Practices That Support Learning… Teachers and departments have a shared understanding or definition of each grade or performance level.
  36. 36. Contact Information Jonathan Vervaet Email: jonathanvervaet@gmail.com or Twitter: @jonathanvervaet

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