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Langely Fundamental Middle and Highschool September 26, 2013

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Assessment and Motivation

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Langely Fundamental Middle and Highschool September 26, 2013

  1. 1. Motivation & Assessment for Learning Presented by: Jonathan Vervaet @jonathanvervaet September 27th, 2013
  2. 2. Learning Intentions “I can find evidence of current motivation and assessment research in my current practice.”
  3. 3. Learning Intentions “I can become curious about something in the research I want to inquire further into.”
  4. 4. Learning Intentions “I can outline the key principals of AFL and articulate what that looks like in practice.”
  5. 5. Proficient Readers Research Successful readers – regardless of age – are active, purposeful, strategic, and metacognitive.
  6. 6. Proficient Readers Research They construct meaning and learn from text by using cognitive strategies before, during, and after reading.
  7. 7. “No matter what grade level you teach, no matter what content you teach, no matter what you teach with, your goal is to improve students’ comprehension and understanding.”
  8. 8. “Student learning is enhanced when teachers at all grades, teaching all subjects, see themselves as teachers of literacy.”
  9. 9. Instructional Design The 8 Cognitive Functions Good Readers Use
  10. 10. 1. Setting a purpose / Reading with purpose in mind 2. Activating background knowledge to enhance understanding 3. Monitoring comprehension and awareness of how to repair comprehension problems 4. Determining what’s important
  11. 11. 5. Making inferences and drawing conclusions 6. Visualizing mental images 7. Synthesizing and accurately summarizing information 8. Making connections
  12. 12. Carol Dweck (2006)
  13. 13. Csikzentmihalyi (1990) Flow Theory – The exhilarating moments when we feel in control, full of purpose, and in the zone.
  14. 14. Csikzentmihalyi (1990) Skill Level Challenge Level
  15. 15. Daniel Pink (2009) Autonomy –over task, time, team, and technique. Mastery – Becoming better at something that matters. Purpose
  16. 16. Motivation: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us
  17. 17. Harlow (1949) Radical finding, there was a third drive. The performance of the task provided intrinsic reward. The monkeys solved the problem simply because they found it gratifying to solve the puzzle.
  18. 18. 2 Harlow (1949) Rewarded the monkey with raisons. “Introduction of food in the present experiment served to disrupt performance, a phenomena not reported in the literature.” The monkeys made more errors and solved the puzzles less frequently.
  19. 19. Rewards transform interesting tasks into drudgery.
  20. 20. Offering an award signals that the task is undesirable.
  21. 21. Focus on Short Term vs. Long Term Benefits
  22. 22. When goals are imposed and incentivized… Focus is narrowed on achieving only that goal.
  23. 23. and… Here’s the kicker…
  24. 24. It leads to unethical behaviour in an attempt to reach the goal. aka..
  25. 25. Cheating…
  26. 26. When rewards do work… With routine and mechanical tasks.
  27. 27. You can’t undermine intrinsic motivation in boring tasks.
  28. 28. The Latin root word for assessment is "assidere" which means to sit beside.
  29. 29. Assessment is done with, and not to, students to help them grow in their learning.
  30. 30. Our Traditional System • Students are penalized if the don’t learn fast enough... Even though we know learning is an individual / developmental process. • What you do at the beginning of the course will always count against you... Despite the fact the student might now understand what they did wrong and how to prevent it in the future. • Grades include all student attributes... Even though we know grades should reflect the student’s ability to meet PLOs.
  31. 31. Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment
  32. 32. When carried out effectively, informal classroom assessment with constructive feedback will raise levels of attainment. We know from research that effective assessment for learning can Improve student achievement substantially, and helps low achievers the most. Source: Black and William, Inside the Black Box 1998
  33. 33. The effect sizes, that is the student gains in learning triggered by formative assessment, were among the largest ever reported for educational interventions. Source: Black and William, Inside the Black Box 1998
  34. 34. Assessment for Learning 1. Learning Intentions 2. Success Criteria 3. Descriptive Feedback 4. Questioning 5. Peer / Self Assessment 6. Ownership
  35. 35. Formative Ongoing Ungraded and Descriptive (uses words) Provides feedback to students and teacher Examples: -Oral questioning -Draft work -Reflections -Portfolio reviews -Peer / self assessments Summative Occurs at the end of a learning progression Graded to determine achievement level Evaluative Examples: -Inquiry projects -Presentations -Grade conferences -Portfolio reviews -Tests and quizzes
  36. 36. Assessment for Learning 1. Learning Intentions 2. Success Criteria 3. Descriptive Feedback 4. Questioning 5. Peer / Self Assessment 6. Ownership
  37. 37. Learning Intentions: What are we learning? Vs. Learning Activities: What are we doing?
  38. 38. Learning Intentions  I can statements…  try and use child friendly language  separate from the activity instructions  make it visible  discuss with students why they are learning it
  39. 39. Determine Acceptable Evidence
  40. 40. Performance Tasks
  41. 41. What does good look like? What does good look
  42. 42. Success Criteria and the Use of Performance Standards
  43. 43. Beginning Developed Accomplished Exemplary
  44. 44. Reading Performance Standard Grade 2
  45. 45. Thinking Rubric: Grade 9 Assignment: Name: Aspect Approaching Expectations Meeting Expectations Fully Meeting Expectations Exceeding Expectations Meaning Purpose Ideas and information; use of details Purpose is unclear; unfocused. Details, examples and quotations are missing or are not clearly linked to topic. Purpose is clear; may lose focus. Accurate details, examples and quotations; may not clearly link to the purpose. Mainly summary and may rely on general knowledge or emotion. Purpose is clear; focus is kept throughout. Accurate details, examples and quotations clearly linked to topic with conclusions or opinions attempted. Purpose and focus are clear throughout the entire assignment. Details, examples and quotations are fully explained with logical conclusions or opinions. Connections / Conclusions Connections Conclusions Connections between ideas are missing or very weak. No conclusions attempted or arrived at. Connections between ideas are attempted, but weak / simplistic. Little or no attempt at conclusions about the topic. Makes clear connections between ideas beyond the obvious. Has attempted to come to conclusions about the topic. Can relate the topic to a broader idea or other situations. Makes meaningful and deep connections throughout. Has come to clear and concise conclusions about the topic Comments / Suggestions:
  46. 46. Summative Assessment Rubric: Athenian Democracy Is justice / freedom key for a society to be civilized? Approaching Expectations Meeting Expectations Fully Meeting Expectations Exceeding Expectations Snapshot Does not accomplish the basic task; may be flawed or incomplete. Ideas may be misinterpreted or overly simplistic. Accomplishes the purpose at a basic level with some gaps. Ideas are minimal and lack support. Accomplishes the purpose showing some complexity and maturity. Ideas are clear and well- developed . Exceeds the requirements of the task, showing complexity and maturity. Ideas are thoroughly developed, specific and economical. Meaning -Focus -Understand -Development - Specific details/support · Lacks focus and purpose · Minimal understanding of topic · Inadequate development · Some focus around a specific topic; purpose may be unclear · Basic understanding with minimal analysis · Development and support are evident but simplistic · Clearly focused around a specific purpose, audience · Understanding and analysis are generally evident · Tightly focused around a specific topic, purpose, audience · Interpretation and analysis demonstrate control and complexity Support -Detailed and specific information to support argument · Limited recall of factual content (lacks details/support) · May not be clearly linked to the topic · Minimal recall of support/details · References need further explanation. · Ideas are clearly developed and explained with appropriate support. · Ideas are thoroughly developed, strongly supported, well explained. I can describe the development of Athenian democracy and compare it to democracy in the present day. I can describe how Athenian democracy is a reflection of Athenian values. Comments:
  47. 47. Summative Assessment Rubric: The Russian Revolution Approaching Expectations Meeting Expectations Fully Meeting Expectations Exceeding Expectations Snapshot Does not accomplish the basic task; may be flawed or incomplete. Ideas may be misinterpreted or overly simplistic. Accomplishes the purpose at a basic level with some gaps. Ideas are minimal and lack support. Accomplishes the purpose showing some complexity and maturity. Ideas are clear and well- developed. Exceeds the requirements of the task, showing complexity and maturity. Ideas are thoroughly developed, specific and economical. Comprehension -Identify main ideas - Define key terms or phrases Struggles to identify some main ideas; skips over difficult parts; doesn’t define key terms or phrases. Identifies some main ideas, may skip over some parts; attempts to define some key terms or phrases. Clearly and accurately identifies most of the main ideas; defines most key terms or phrases. Accurately identifies the main ideas; defines all key terms and phrases. Makes logical connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Makes few or no connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Makes some connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Makes logical connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Makes insightful and original connections to other key events in the Russian Revolution. Comments:
  48. 48. Quick Scale: Reading Literature (Grades 10-12) Comments: Aspect Approaching Expectations (I range) Minimally Meeting Expectations (C- to C range) Fully Meeting Expectations (C+ to B+ range) Exceeding Expectations (A range) SNAPSHOT You offer an illogical and/or underdeveloped explanation and interpretation of texts. You offer a limited or surface-level explanation and interpretation of texts. You offer a logical explanation and interpretation of texts. You offer an analytic, thorough explanation and interpretation of texts. EXPLAIN àshow your work Even though I am thinking, I have difficulty and/or don’t understand how to explain or give examples about my process. I can attempt to explain my thinking, but have trouble clarifying my process. I may use examples, but they may be limited. I can explain my thinking process and use specific examples. I can explain my thinking process in detail, including the small steps or subtleties in my process. COMPREHEND àwho, what, when, where and how (W4 H): context Even though I can identify the W 4 H, I may misread, confuse and/or omit some key elements. My examples may be limited or flawed. I can identify the W 4 H and attempt to explain a basic understanding of their relationship. I can use some examples. I can identify and explain the relationships between the W 4 H. I can use explicit examples. I can identify and explain the relationships and subtleties between and amongst the W 4 H. I can effectively use explicit and/or implicit examples. CONNECT àtext to self, text to text, text to world Even though I attempt to make connections, they may be flawed, irrelevant, and/or incomplete. My examples may be limited, flawed and/or unjustifiable. I can establish and may be able to explain basic connections between the text and myself, other texts and/or the world. I can use some examples. I can establish and explain clear connections between the text and myself, other texts and/or the world. I can use explicit examples. I can establish and synthesize insightful connections between the text and myself, other texts and/or the world. I can effectively use explicit and/or implicit examples. INTERPRET àthe “why?”, drawing conclusions: inferences BK + TE = I Even though I attempt to use my background knowledge and/or evidence from the text, my interpretations may be general, unsupported and/or irrelevant. I can use my background knowledge and/or evidence from the text to make simple and/or obvious interpretations. I can use my background knowledge and/or evidence from the text to make clear, logical interpretations. I can effectively use my background knowledge and/or evidence from the text to make thoughtful, insightful interpretations.
  49. 49. If students don’t understand the words used in the rubric, it might as well be written in a foreign language.
  50. 50. Design Activities to have students “translate” performance standards into student friendly language.
  51. 51. Keep the Language Consistent across Rubrics
  52. 52. Assessment for Learning 1. Learning Intentions 2. Success Criteria 3. Descriptive Feedback 4. Questioning 5. Peer / Self Assessment 6. Ownership
  53. 53. Formative Assessment = Descriptive Feedback Informs the student Informs the teacher Informs Learning
  54. 54. Descriptive Feedback Another way of thinking about feed back is… What’s working? How do I know? What’s not? Why not? What’s next? What is the fix?
  55. 55. Self and Peer Assessment Student self-reflection on the helpfulness of feedback
  56. 56. Assessment for Learning 1. Learning Intentions 2. Success Criteria 3. Descriptive Feedback 4. Questioning 5. Peer / Self Assessment 6. Ownership
  57. 57. Metacognition Thinking about thinking… Self monitoring and regulation.
  58. 58. Reflection: I used to think… But now I think…
  59. 59. Portfolio Collection Criteria for Selection Samples of Work Process: Choose an assignment that had a number of steps you had to complete in order to be successful. Improvement: These assignments should clearly show improvement in some area of your learning. You may wish to compare two assignments. Perseverance: These are assignments that at first you found difficult but worked hard at, without giving up, and eventually were successful. Risk Taking: These are assignments in which you moved out of your comfort zone and tried something new or unexpected. Favourite: These are your favourite assignments you completed in this period of time. Something of Personal Significance: These are any assignments that are significant to you in anyway. Burn it: This is an assignment that you wish you could burn and never look at again.
  60. 60. Student Reflection Sheet Assignment Title: Date: The attached evidence is (ex. first draft, outline, notes, brainstorming, reflection, WIN, project, reading log etc.): This piece of work shows: ___ a process ___ improvement ___ perseverance ___ risk taking ___ one of my favourites ___ something of personal significance ___ something to burn! How does this piece of work meet the criteria? Two or three reasons I chose to highlight this piece in my portfolio are: Some things I learned by completing this assignment are: If I were to do this assignment again I would:
  61. 61. Curriculum Map Unit of Study Learning Intentions – PLOs Big Ideas / Enduring Understandings Essential ?s Concepts (What students need to know) Skills & Strategies Speaking and Listening: Reading and Viewing: Writing and Representing: Metacognition: Formative Assessments / Instructional Activities Summative Assessments Resources Adapted from Pulling Together: Integrating Inquiry, Assessment, and Instruction in Today's English Classroom by Leyton Schnellert, Mehjabeen Datoo, Krista Ediger, Joanne Panas
  62. 62. Comparative Civilizations 12 Curriculum Map Questions to Consider in the Course: What is the goal of life? What role does happiness play in civilizations? What does it mean to be human and happy? Is vulnerability at the root of happiness? (See Brene Brown Ted Talk) Where is the balance between technological advancement and the effect on mother nature? Why are pluralism and tolerance essential for civilization? Is justice a key component in civilization? Is our pride in human achievement blinding us to the eventual end of Western Civilization? Unit of Study Introduction to Civilizations Ancient Egypt: An Inquiry Approach Greece Learning Statements PLOs I can describe concepts that define the studies of civilizations. I can analyse elements and characteristics that contribute to the identity of civilizations. I can using a variety of primary and secondary sources and strategies in research, such as the Internet, texts, artefacts, visual sources, and literature I can develop and defend a position by establishing a thesis, taking a side, providing supporting evidence, and using a variety of sources to support research I can communicate my knowledge and understanding about civilizations by using effective written, oral, and graphic communication skills. I can describe the significance of the following to the study of civilizations: I can research through the use of a variety of primary and secondary sources (e.g., artefacts, artworks, literature, oral tradition) I can describe the philosophical viewpoints of various cultures with regard to universal concepts of life (e.g., love, death, time, space, nature, war and conflict, peace, prosperity, eternity/afterlife) I can analyse the influence of the natural environment on the development and identity of Greek civilization. I can examine a variety of artistic works (statues) with regards to: - influences - materials/techniques - purpose I can analyze how the arts express a civilizations’ cultural elements I can describe the development of Athenian democracy and compare it to democracy in the present day. I can describe how Athenian democracy is a reflection of Athenian values. I can describe the role of philosophical ideas in the development of western culture. I can analyse how cultural values and ideas are transmitted over time.
  63. 63. English 10 Curriculum Map Unit of Study A Quest Toward Perfection: Dystopian Literature Inevitability and Fate: From Teen to Adulthood Is the Grass Going to be Greener?: Hope for Future Generations Learning Intentions I can interact and collaborate in pairs and groups to - understand the perspectives of others - comprehend and respond to a variety of texts During reading, I can select and use a range of strategies to construct, monitor, and confirm meaning, including: - making connections – making inferences and drawing conclusions I can write purposeful information texts that express ideas and information to – explore and respond – analyse and explain – speculate and consider – argue and persuade Big Ideas / Enduring Understandings We use dialogue and discussion to develop, synthesize and clarify ideas. An understanding of literature is key to an understanding of oneself, one’s community, and the world. We need to reflect on, monitor, and regulate our own learning in order to improve. Speaking and listening, reading and viewing and writing and representing are recursive / iterative processes. Our cultural, historical, political and social backgrounds influence our attitudes. A good thinker uses interpretations, analysis, synthesis and evaluation to deepen and enhance understanding. Reading the world always precedes reading the word. We need to reflect on, monitor, and regulate our own learning in order to improve. Our cultural, historical, political and social backgrounds influence our attitudes about the world. We need to reflect on, monitor, and regulate our own learning in order to improve. What will tomorrow look like? Is fate inevitable? Where is the basis for hope in the
  64. 64. Social Studies 9 Curriculum Map Unit of Study Identity From Exploration to Colonialism Modern Canada: A Reflection of its Past PLOs I can assess how identity is shaped by: - family - gender - belief - ethnicity - nationality I can describe the daily life in Aboriginal communities. I can analyse the reasons for initial exploration and settlement of North America. I can analyse the relationship between Aboriginal people and Europeans. I can assess how economic systems contributed to the development of Canada. I can analyse the effects of colonialism on trade and conflict. I can assess the impact of the fur trade on exploration and settlement. I can analyse the roots of present-day regional, cultural and social issues within Canada. I can investigate to roots of Canada’s political and legal systems, including the development of two legal systems from two cultures. Big Ideas / Enduring Understandings Identity is shaped by many different and connecting factors. It is used to identify one as distinct from others and also as part of a homogenous group. Artistic expression is a reflection of the society in which it was created. Colonialism exploits natural resources. Early contact allowed for an exchange of technologies and goods. Present day institutions are based in the past. Essential ?s What makes us who we are? How is art a reflection of culture? What role does ethnicity play when people interact? Why do people explore? What is at the root of conflict? How do people make decisions? How does a desire for power and wealth affect relationships? What do we see in our society today that is clearly influenced by our history? What can we expect in our future based on where we’ve been in the past? Concepts (What students need to know) Identity Nationality Ethnicity Heterogeneous vs. Homogeneous Cultures How the Renaissance influenced exploration Ethnocentrism Colonization – The movement of people into a new area with the intent of developing the economy, religion and culture primarily for the benefit of its members back home. Mercantilism Colony Mother country Theocracy Anglophone / Francophone Separatist Referendum
  65. 65. Social Studies 9: Final Project Enduring Understandings Learning Intentions Essential Questions Identity is shaped by many different and connecting factors. It is used to identify one as distinct from others and also as part of a homogenous group. I can assess how identity is shaped by: - family - gender - belief - ethnicity - nationality What makes us who we are? How is art a reflection of culture? What role does ethnicity play when people interact? Colonialism exploits natural resources. Early contact allowed for an exchange of technologies and goods. I can analyse the reasons for initial exploration and settlement of North America. I can analyse the relationship between Aboriginal people and Europeans. I can assess how economic systems contributed to the development of Canada. I can analyse the effects of colonialism on trade and conflict. I can assess the impact of the fur trade on exploration and settlement. Why do people explore? What is at the root of conflict? How do people make decisions? How does a desire for power and wealth affect relationships? Present day institutions are based in the past. Institutions and ideas are rooted in historical struggles / accomplishments I can analyse the roots of present-day regional, cultural and social issues within Canada. What do we see in our society today that is clearly influenced by our history? What can we expect in our future based on where we’ve been in the past? People are generally capable of improving themselves and their lives. As ideas of around rights develop people are more likely to attempt to fight for those rights in the form of armed revolts. Science is used to uncover / discover the natural of human behaviour. I can analyse the ideas of the Enlightenment thinkers and speculate how their ideas can contribute to revolution and conflict. Are rules necessary for civilized societies to exist? Are people generally good or bad? Change in history is often rooted in violence. The average citizen in society has a powerful voice. I can analyse the factors that contribute to revolution and conflict. I can analyse the contribution of the American, English and French Revolutions in the development of democratic concepts. What constitutes a Rebellious Act? Do people have the right to rebel against a government they don’t like? What are the roots of democracy? When is democracy actually democratic? Does democracy exist? Is democracy realistically attainable? Is democracy necessary to ensure the rights of people are upheld? How much violence is justified in securing a better future?
  66. 66. "We must constantly remind ourselves that the ultimate purpose of evaluation is to have students become self evaluating. If students graduate from our schools still dependent upon others to tell them when they are adequate, good, or excellent, then we’ve missed the whole point of what education is about.” - Costa and Kallick (1992)
  67. 67. “We know that sustained, collaborative, inquiry based professional development can help teachers develop new understandings and approaches.”
  68. 68. Grade wide, interdisciplinary teaching teams working on shared goals can make a significant difference in student learning.
  69. 69. Contact Information Jonathan Vervaet Email: jonathanvervaet@gmail.com Twitter: @jonathanvervaet Blog: jonathanvervaet.wordpress.com

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