Baskin 2nd Ad Revolution

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Some emerging and incomplete thoughts about the immense opportunity for advertising

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Baskin 2nd Ad Revolution

  1. 1. The Second Advertising Revolution Wednesday, January 27, 2010
  2. 2. Agenda • Social: the message is the medium • A 3 minute history of advertising • I say we want a revolution... • 2 invitations
  3. 3. Today
  4. 4. United Breaks Guitars
  5. 5. A social media success story • 7 million+ views on YouTube (top video of 2009) • Spawned sequels 2 & 3 • Dave Carroll’s band has new fans
  6. 6. A corporate failure Unanswered Lots of Angry posts on YouTube negative United’s comments tweets Facebook page
  7. 7. The business impact • United sold fewer tickets • Stock price fell & never recovered • Employees agitated for more support • Its competitors exploited the snafu • Now, passengers expect more & are less tolerant of shortcomings
  8. 8. The business impact Nope.
  9. 9. Ford Fiesta Movement
  10. 10. How Ford got social media right? • Engaged twentysomething “culture creators” • “Adventures return as meaning for the brand and value for the company” • “Sensational” results: • 6.5 million YouTube views • 50,000 requests for info about the car • Sold 10,000 units in first six days of sales
  11. 11. The message of the medium
  12. 12. How did we get here?
  13. 13. A 3 minute history of advertising • People used to make purchase decisions based on • The reality of need • The constraints of context • The contributions of community
  14. 14. A 3 minute history of advertising • People used to make purchase decisions based on • The reality of need • The constraints of context • The contributions of community • It was this way for the first 15,000 years of human history
  15. 15. A 3 minute history of advertising • People used to make purchase decisions based on • The reality of need • The constraints of context • The contributions of community • It was this way for the first 15,000 years of human history • Advertising -- “paid commercial speech” -- was ‘invented’ to prompt these decision moments
  16. 16. Old old school
  17. 17. A 3 minute history of advertising • Then came the creative revolution • Consumers were cynical • Production was flush • Media were still centralized
  18. 18. A 3 minute history of advertising • Then came the creative revolution • Consumers were cynical • Production was flush • Media were still centralized • The revolution gave us • Imagined benefits • Make-believe differentiation • Brands before behaviors
  19. 19. A 3 minute history of advertising • Then came the creative revolution • Consumers were cynical • Production was flush • Media were still centralized • The revolution gave us • Imagined benefits • Make-believe differentiation • Brands before behaviors • The focus moved internal, and the prompt from actions to intentions
  20. 20. New school
  21. 21. What has the creative revolution yielded?
  22. 22. What has the creative revolution yielded? • Reputations that have plummeted
  23. 23. What has the creative revolution yielded? • Reputations that have plummeted • Loyalty is a thing of the past
  24. 24. What has the creative revolution yielded? • Reputations that have plummeted • Loyalty is a thing of the past • Brand premium often diluted or perceived as a “tax”
  25. 25. What has the creative revolution yielded? • Reputations that have plummeted • Loyalty is a thing of the past • Brand premium often diluted or perceived as a “tax” • Helped put “traditional” channels into terminal decline • Viewership & circulation down • Ad believability is at all-time lows
  26. 26. • Content is inherently more credible if it makes no claims to authority or commerce • Relevance is directly proportional to this authenticity, and indirectly proportional to expectation (i.e. give less to get more) • Only the stuff that is apparently worthless possesses any value
  27. 27. Isn’t it time for a real revolution in advertising?
  28. 28. Definitions Advertising • The act or practice of calling public attention to one’s product, service, need, etc. via paid announcements
  29. 29. Definitions Advertising • The act or practice of calling public attention to one’s product, service, need, etc. via paid announcements Media • An intervening agency, means, or instrument
  30. 30. Definitions Advertising • The act or practice of calling public attention to one’s product, service, need, etc. via paid announcements Media • An intervening agency, means, or instrument Revolution • A single complete cycle of motion of one object around a point
  31. 31. Was the first revolution a revolution?
  32. 32. Or a brief exception to older rules?
  33. 33. A second revolution Advertising could be the “new” tool • To attach... • The reality of need • The constraints of context • The contributions of community • ...not to brand, or conversation, or some new rule that requires a Geiger Counter to measure...but to consumer actions
  34. 34. A second revolution Could trying to sell things be authentic, credible, reliable, and ultimately more compelling to consumers vs. trying to pretend otherwise?
  35. 35. A second revolution What could the return of paid commercial speech look like?
  36. 36. The reality of need • The return of functional differentiation • Invent new services • Don’t claim differences where none exist
  37. 37. The reality of need • The return of functional differentiation • Invent new services • Don’t claim differences where none exist • Clarity replaces nuance • Why better, not just different • Own tangible benefit, not conceptual “position”
  38. 38. The reality of need • The return of functional differentiation • Invent new services • Don’t claim differences where none exist • Clarity replaces nuance • Why better, not just different • Own tangible benefit, not conceptual “position” • Every touch leads to an action • Why isn’t everything you do direct marketing?
  39. 39. The constraints of context • Relate to consumption, not eyeballs • Retention is a means to an end • What’s going on more important than what you’re saying (i.e. why Facebook ads don’t work)
  40. 40. The constraints of context • Relate to consumption, not eyeballs • Retention is a means to and end • What’s going on more important than what you’re saying (i.e. why Facebook ads don’t work) • The longtail of Internet search • Why the music industry hates consumers • If your claim isn’t pre-qualified by an outside source, it’s not believable
  41. 41. The constraints of context • Relate to consumption, not eyeballs • Retention is a means to and end • What’s going on more important than what you’re saying (i.e. why Facebook ads don’t work) • The longtail of Internet search • Why the music industry hates consumers • If your claim isn’t pre-qualified by an outside source, it’s not believable • Immediate utility or bust • Messages that say “use it or lose it”
  42. 42. The contributions of community • Facts, not opinions • Be the reliable source, not another participant • Don’t debate (pig wrestling...)
  43. 43. The contributions of community • Facts, not opinions • Be the reliable source, not another participant • Don’t debate (pig wrestling...) • Host real conversations • Not versations, and not about your marketing • Where’s the race to own the most substantive social platform for your industry?
  44. 44. The contributions of community • Facts, not opinions • Be the reliable source, not another participant • Don’t debate (pig wrestling...) • Host real conversations • Not versations, and not about your marketing • Where’s the race to own the most substantive social platform for your industry? • Every interaction a medium for selling • How would HR interviews or legal strategies change if advertisers helped craft them?
  45. 45. A second revolution • Could ads present more authentic content than the output of the crowd? • Could an advertising approach to every external interaction make it more honest and therefore credible? • Could ads rival journalism/blogging as a reliable publisher of content? • Could it make every medium -- every place and way messages are communicated -- more compelling?
  46. 46. What would a real advertising revolution look like?
  47. 47. Invitation # 1 David • Help us write the book Ogilvy’s • Examples from your experience • Your ideas Revenge • Are there small actions you’d like to test? Let’s narrate it... by Jonathan Salem Baskin & Sue Unerman
  48. 48. Invitation # 2 • Help me write “CMO Confidential” • Anonymous tidbits of what thrills, bores, or scares you • Issues you’re facing, and observations about what they mean • What’s on your mind...in real time
  49. 49. The Second Advertising Revolution Wednesday, January 27, 2010

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