Theory, Research and Practice in Educational Management

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Theory, Research and Practice in Educational Management

  1. 1. T HEORY, R ESEARCH ANDP RACTICE IN E DUCATIONALM ANAGEMENT
  2. 2. E DUCATIONAL M ANAGEMENT A field of study and practice concerned with the operation of educational institutions (Bush, 2003)
  3. 3. S IGNIFICANCE OF E DUCATIONAL M ANAGEMENT Great interest in educational management started in the early part of the 21st century “The quality of leadership makes a significant difference to school and student outcomes.” (Bush, 2007) Effective Managers = Best Possible Education
  4. 4. A IMS OF E DUCATIONAL I NSTITUTIONS Educational management has to be concerned with the purpose and aims of education Aims should be determined by assessing the needs of the learners Educational aims are usually pressured by external influences
  5. 5. L EADERSHIP VS . M ANAGEMENT According to Cuban (1988):  Leadership = Change / Purpose  Management = Maintenance / Implementation Both leadership and management are important The challenge of modern organizations require the qualities of both the leader and the manager (Bolman & Deal, 1997)
  6. 6. M ANAGERIAL L EADERSHIP Leaders should focus on functions, tasks , and behaviors (Leithwood et al., 1999) The principal’s authority is perceived as “god- given” and “juridical” (Bush, 2007)
  7. 7. T RANSFORMATIONAL L EADERSHIP Central focuses are the commitments and capacities of the organization’s members (Leithwood et al., 1999) In order to succeed, the commitment of members are needed (Cadwell & Spinks, 1992) This approach has the potential to engage all stakeholders in the achievement of educational objectives (Bush, 2007)
  8. 8. PARTICIPATIVE L EADERSHIP Central focus are the decision-making processes of the group (Leithwood et al., 1999) Participation will increase school effectiveness Leadership is potentially available to any legitimate stakeholder “The burdens of leadership will be less if leadership functions and roles will be shared.” (Sergiovanni, 1984)
  9. 9. P OST - MODERN L EADERSHIP Suggests that leaders should respect and give attention to the diverse and individual perspectives of the stakeholders. (Bush, 2007) Advocates a more consultative, participatory, and inclusionary stance. (Starratt, 2001) Stakeholders have a right to be heard (Sackney & Mitchell, 2001)
  10. 10. M ORAL L EADERSHIP Critical focus of leadership should be on the values, beliefs, and ethics of leaders themselves. (Leithwood et al., 1999) Excellent schools have central zones composed of values and beliefs that take on sacred or cultural characteristics. (Sergiovanni, 1984)
  11. 11. I NSTRUCTIONAL L EADERSHIP Focuses on the direction of influence rather that its nature (Bush, 2007) Strongly concerned with teaching and learning, including teachers’ professional learning and student growth (Southworth, 2002) Leaders’ influence is targeted at student learning via teachers (Bush & Glover, 2002)
  12. 12. C ONTINGENT L EADERSHIP Recognizes the diverse nature of school contexts Recognizes the advantages of adapting various leadership styles Does not subscribe to a “one size fits all” model “The managerial job is too complex and unpredictable to rely on a set of standardized responses to events.” (Yukl, 2002)
  13. 13. C ONCLUSION Leadership can be understood as a process of influence leading to a vision for the school. The vision is articulated by the leaders who seek to gain the commitment of the staff and stakeholders Regardless of which approach is used, the focus should be managing teaching and learning
  14. 14. T HEORY, R ESEARCH ANDP RACTICE IN E DUCATIONALM ANAGEMENT

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