Walking the walk for ER&L 2014

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Walking the walk for ER&L 2014

  1. 1. Walking the Walk: Starting Up and Cultivating Two Different Open Access Journals in LIS Joseph Kraus, University of Denver Marie Kennedy, Loyola Marymount University March 18, 2014 1
  2. 2. The Ministry of 2
  3. 3. Walking the walk? What do I mean by this? • Libraries try to provide as much access to as much information as possible as economically as possible • Many librarians are encouraged to publish • Many librarians subscribe to and provide content to commercial publishers • And yet librarians complain about those commercial publishers • We can support and build journals that do not rely on those traditional publishers 3
  4. 4. It’s not JUST 4
  5. 5. Open Access of course • But, what type of OA? • CC-BY-NC-ND • CC-BY • And… 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. Gratis & Libre • “From now on, Open Access means CC-BY.” – Heather Joseph, SPARC OA Meeting, March 2012. • “It is about time to stop calling anything Open Access that is not covered by CC-BY, CC-zero, or equivalent.” – Jan Velterop, LIBLICENSE, March 2012 • Some are proponents of this, some are not. – http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/library_talks/89/ – Paul Royster, University of Nebraska-Lincoln 7
  8. 8. Case 1 – Gratis • Collaborative Librarianship • CC-BY-NC-ND • How did the journal start? • What is my role with the journal 8
  9. 9. Case 1 – Economics • Balance as of November 5, 2013 –About $7,000 Income • Donations from institutions such as Regis University, University of Colorado Boulder, University of Denver, and others • Nominal income from EBSCO and Gale for providing content 9
  10. 10. Case 1 – Economics Expenses • Lunch meetings every once in a while –For example, $124.94 • Domain name registration • Printing bookmarks and business cards • Small stipend for a columnist • Boosting a post on Facebook • Website redesign fee 10
  11. 11. Case 1 – Economics Expenses not incurred • Donated time of editors • Donated time of peer-reviewers • Donated server space at the Colorado Alliance of Research Libraries • Donated time of technical services folk 11
  12. 12. Case 1 – Use Data • Total article views: 273,428 as of January 29, 2014 • OJS provides this data to administrators • 135 citations in Google Scholar 12
  13. 13. Collaborative Lib. News 13
  14. 14. Collaborative Lib. News 14
  15. 15. Case 2 – Libre • Journal of Creative Library Practice • Discuss the history of this journal • Why Libre? • Platform for the journal • What are some other CC-BY LIS journals? – Practical Academic Librarianship – The Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication – http://jlsc-pub.org/jlsc/vol1/iss1/5/ 15
  16. 16. Case 2 – Economics • Cheap, $174 per year 16
  17. 17. Case 2 – Use Data • Google Analytics – 12,990 Unique Pageviews in 2013 17
  18. 18. Pageview statistics example 18 Page Page views Unique Pageviews Avg. Time on Page Entran ces % Bounce Rate % Exit total 15,171 12,990 0:02:04 9,451 76.00 62.30 /2013/02/05/w hy-does-the- world-need-yet- another- journal/ 229 200 143.17 27 74.07 48.03
  19. 19. Marketing of the journals What kind of marketing do we currently do? • Blog posts that feed into Twitter accounts • Press Releases • Post to library discussion lists • Have the journal in DOAJ and/or Library literature databases • (Try to) get noticed by the traditional media 19
  20. 20. The results of a Google search for “marketing is”
  21. 21. WHAT’S MARKETING?
  22. 22. Joe
  23. 23. Do you or your team have a creative technical solution to a problem, creative social solution, or creative policy solutions? Do you have any creative fundraising ideas? Can you make amazing creative signage for your library? Have you creatively designed a website? Did you employ out of the box thinking? What worked, and what didn’t work? The Journal of Creative Library Practice will provide an . This journal intends to reach librarians and information professionals of all types, including academic, public, school, special, medical, legal, and others. We would also like to reach out to readers interested in libraries as well as those interested in critical information studies. Other readers may include teachers, parents, business people or college students. If a reader is interested in learning more about the creative use of technologies, policies or services to enhance the exchange of information from one person to another (or from one computer to another), then they may be interested in this journal. --from the About page of The Journal of Creative Library Practice
  24. 24. Get submissions
  25. 25. Get submissions What’s out there?
  26. 26. Get submissions What’s out there? Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats
  27. 27. Do you or your team have a creative technical solution to a problem, creative social solution, or creative policy solutions? Do you have any creative fundraising ideas? Can you make amazing creative signage for your library? Have you creatively designed a website? Did you employ out of the box thinking? What worked, and what didn’t work? The Journal of Creative Library Practice will provide an . This journal intends to reach librarians and information professionals of all types, including academic, public, school, special, medical, legal, and others. We would also like to reach out to readers interested in libraries as well as those interested in critical information studies. Other readers may include teachers, parents, business people or college students. If a reader is interested in learning more about the creative use of technologies, policies or services to enhance the exchange of information from one person to another (or from one computer to another), then they may be interested in this journal. --from the About page of The Journal of Creative Library Practice
  28. 28. Get submissions What’s out there? Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats
  29. 29. Get submissions What’s out there? Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats Who are we talking to?
  30. 30. Get submissions What’s out there? Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats Who are we talking to? Timeline
  31. 31. Get submissions What’s out there? Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats Who are we talking to? What, by when?How, what?
  32. 32. Get submissions What’s out there? Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats Who are we talking to? What, by when?How, what? $, timeline, who?
  33. 33. Get submissions What’s out there? Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats Who are we talking to? What, by when?How, what? $, timeline, who? Tracking
  34. 34. Get submissions What’s out there? Strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats Who are we talking to? What, by when?How, what? $, timeline, who? Tracking Reflection, planning ahead
  35. 35. Questions? • Joseph Kraus • @OAJoe • Joseph.kraus@du.edu • Marie Kennedy • @orgmonkey • marie.kennedy@lmu.edu 42
  36. 36. Notes Here are some URLs for some of the images used. • Ministry of silly walks, http://www.flickr.com/photos/sfllaw/42360471/ CC BY-SA 2.0 • Not just rocket science, http://www.flickr.com/photos/swanksalot/51203085 69/ CC BY-SA 2.0 • Gratis and Libre, http://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/5755 171802/ CC BY-SA 2.0 43

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