Propertiesof Matter

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  • Extensive Properties : depend upon the amount of the substance present. Examples: mass, length, volume
  • Intensive Properties : independent of the amount of substance present. Examples: density, color, state, melting point, boiling point, texture, conductivity, malleability, ductility
  • This is simply how readily the oil flows. A higher viscosity oil will withstand more heat than a lower viscosity oil. However, at colder temperatures it can actually become so thick that your starter cannot turn over the engine - and worse yet it won't flow to all the moving parts it should. A viscosity that is too low won't maintain a lubricating film on engine parts - allowing them to make metal-to-metal contact. Either extreme is very bad! The first number on a multi-grade oil indicates the "cold" viscosity of the lubricant - the second number the "hot" viscosity. For example, a SAE 10W-40 motor oil would have a viscosity rating of 10 at 0-degrees Fahrenheit (the W indicates "Winter") and a 40 rating at its maximum recommended temperature (not engine operating temperature - ambient air temperature).
  • Propertiesof Matter

    1. 1. Properties of Matter November 6, 2009
    2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>Define matter, conductivity, malleability, viscosity, solubility </li></ul><ul><li>Describe physical properties of matter </li></ul><ul><li>Explain what happens during physical changes </li></ul>
    3. 3. Definition <ul><li>Matter is anything that has mass and volume </li></ul><ul><li>Everything is made of matter </li></ul>
    4. 4. Classifying Matter Matter Elements Compounds Homogeneous Heterogeneous All matter has physical and chemical properties. Pure Substances Mixtures
    5. 5. <ul><li>Properties are characteristics used to describe an object </li></ul><ul><li>Physical properties are those that can be observed without changing the identity of the substance </li></ul>
    6. 6. Extensive Properties <ul><li>Depends on the amount of matter present </li></ul><ul><li>mass </li></ul><ul><li>volume </li></ul><ul><li>length </li></ul><ul><li>density </li></ul><ul><li>shape </li></ul>
    7. 9. Intensive Properties <ul><li>Independent of the amount of matter present </li></ul><ul><li>color </li></ul><ul><li>state </li></ul><ul><li>melting and boiling point </li></ul><ul><li>texture </li></ul><ul><li>magnetic attraction </li></ul><ul><li>brittleness </li></ul><ul><li>hardness </li></ul><ul><li>malleability </li></ul><ul><li>conductivity </li></ul><ul><li>viscosity </li></ul>
    8. 10. conductivity <ul><li>the measure of the ease at which an electric charge or heat can pass through a material </li></ul>
    9. 11. malleability <ul><li>the property of something that can be worked or hammered or shaped without breaking </li></ul>
    10. 12. viscosity <ul><li>The resistance of a liquid to flow </li></ul><ul><li>Example: honey has a higher viscosity than water </li></ul>
    11. 14. solubility <ul><li>The ability to dissolve in another substance </li></ul>
    12. 15. Physical Changes in Matter <ul><li>No new substances are made. Examples: cutting, grinding, any phase change. </li></ul><ul><li>A physical change may involve changing the shape of the object. </li></ul><ul><li>You can get the original materials back. </li></ul>

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