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Chapter 30 19th Century Art In Europe And The United States 3

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Chapter 30 19th Century Art In Europe And The United States 3

  1. 1. Chapter 30: 19th Century Art in Europe and the United States<br />Impressionism<br />Magister Ricard<br />AP Art History<br />
  2. 2. 19th Century Artistic Developments: The “-isms”<br />
  3. 3. The “-isms”<br />Romanticism – explores feelings and emotions in art found in a classical framework<br />Realism – stressed positivism, objectivity, and challenged the standards of the academies<br />Impressionism – would also deviate from academies but in both subject matter and technique<br />Post impressionists – deviate further by exploring depictions of color and shape, art for art’s sake<br />
  4. 4. Salon des Refuses<br />2,800 rejected submissions to the Salon of Paris (of 5,000 total) were exhibited in the Salon des Refuses<br />These rejected works were divided into academics (worthy) and independents (too modern)<br />Establishes an alternative to accepted forms of art, important in developing future art trends<br />
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  8. 8. Japonisme<br />Japan had been closed to the West until 1850 when the US formed trade agreements<br />Japanese culture became very popular in Europe<br />Woodblock prints became very important to Impressionists and Post-impressionists<br />Ukiyo-e, “floating world”, depicted vignettes from Japanese culture<br />
  9. 9. Japanese Woodblock Prints<br />
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  20. 20. How to Tell Impressionists Apart<br />
  21. 21. Avant-Garde: Trailblazing<br />The term originally refers to military units that have advanced further than the rest of the army<br />Salons where state-run exhibitions, required application for exhibition<br />Impressionists were appreciated by other artists – not general public<br />Once a style becomes mainstream, no longer avant-garde <br />Impression would achieve this in 1890s<br />Exhibitions shift from salon to private gallery<br />
  22. 22. What is Impressionism?<br />Momentary slice of life<br />Captures the effects of light on color<br />Limits the use of black paint<br />Dark greens, brown, purple, blue <br />Juxtaposition of complementary colors for shadow<br />Cropped edges<br />

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