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Ch 14 ARH

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Based on Chapter 14 of Stokstad's Art History.

Published in: Education

Ch 14 ARH

  1. 1. Chapter 14: Early Medieval Art of Europe<br />Magister Ricard<br />Art History<br />
  2. 2. Questions to Consider<br />Who were the Carolingians and what did they leave behind for Western Europe?<br />What cultures inspired the Carolingians?<br />Who were the Ottonians and what did they instill in Western European culture?<br />How does the Gero Crucifix differ from earlier Christian images of Christ?<br />
  3. 3. Art of the Warrior Lords<br />Chapter 14: 400-600 AD<br />
  4. 4. Art of the Warrior Lords<br />The Roman empire dissolved in the West<br />The capital had shifted to the eastern city of Constantinople<br />The administration was left to various tribes, who began to organize things independently <br />Warfare spread during this period, roughly 400-600 AD (sack of Rome was in 476 AD)<br />Most art was small, portable, and of fine metals and precious stones and jewels<br />Used animal motifs known as animal style<br />
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  7. 7. Sutton Hoo:Hiberno-Saxon Art<br />They laid then the beloved chieftain, giver of rings, on the ship&apos;s bosom, glorious by the mast. There were brought many treasures, ornaments from far-off lands. Never have I heard that a vessel was more fairly fitted-out with war-weapons and battle-raiment, swords and coats of mail. On his bosom lay a host of treasures, where were to travel far with him into the power of the flood.“<br />-Beowulf<br />
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  9. 9. Art of the Warrior Lords: Characteristics<br />Interlacing: refers to the ribbon-like interweaving found throughout a design<br />Cloisonne: refers to the technique which solders small and thin strips of a metal to a background metal plate; gaps are then filled<br />Animal Style – repeated use of animal motifs throughout the artwork, usually fighting<br />
  10. 10. Hiberno-Saxon Art<br />Hiberno = Ireland<br />Saxon = England<br />Artwork is similar to Art of the Warrior Lords<br />Christianity begins to spread (St. Patrick 400’s AD) throughout the British Isles<br />Monasteries establish scriptoria<br />Books written by hand - manuscripts<br />These are illuminated manuscripts – illuminate Christian concepts<br />
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  14. 14. Carolingian Art<br />Chapter 14: 700-900 AD<br />
  15. 15. Why Carolingian Art?<br />On Christmas day of the year 800, Pope Leo III crowned Charles the Great (Charlemagne) as emperor of Rome (r. 800-814). <br />He ruled as king of the Franks since 768. <br />Charlemagne came to be seen as the first Holy (that is, Christian) Roman Emperor<br />A title his successors in the West did not formally adopt until the twelfth century.<br />The setting for Charlemagne’s coronation was Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome<br />Built by Constantine.<br />He gave his name (Carolus Magnus in Latin) to an entire era, the Carolingian period.<br />
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  17. 17. Characteristics of Carolingian Art<br />Charlemagne wanted to revive the glory of Rome<br />Artwork and architecture reflects imagery of Roman empire<br />Charlemagne was fascinated by how past rulers were portrayed publicly<br />Equestrian statues convey power<br />In uniting most of Western Europe, became an heir to the glory of Rome himself<br />
  18. 18. Charlemagne turned to the Church to help stabilize his empire through religion and education. He looked to the Benedictine monks as his “cultural army.” <br />Although their principal duties were prayer and liturgical services, monks and nuns spent hours producing books.<br />Palace Chapel, Aachen, Germany, 792-805<br />
  19. 19. The “Three Floor” Elevation<br />clerestory<br />gallery<br />ambulatory<br />
  20. 20. Inside the Medieval Scriptorium<br />Workshop for the production of books by monks or nuns<br />Found within the complex of a monastery<br />Books written on pages of vellum or parchment<br />Produced by scribes and illustrators<br />Signature on last page, called colophon<br />
  21. 21. Carolingian Illuminated Manuscripts<br />St. Matthew, CORONATION GOSPELS, (795-819)<br />St. Matthew, EBBO GOSPELS,(816-835)<br />
  22. 22. Ottonian Art<br />Chapter 14: 900-1100 AD<br />
  23. 23. Ottonian Europe<br />The heirs of Louis the Pious divided the Carolingian Empire into three parts.<br />The western portion eventually became France<br />The eastern part of the empire, roughly modern Germany, Switzerland and Austria, passed to a dynasty of rulers known as the Ottonians after three principal rulers named Otto.<br />Otto I gained control of Italy in 951 and the pope crowned him emperor in 962. <br />Thereafter, Otto and his successors dominated the Papacy and appointments to other high offices.<br />
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  28. 28. Questions to Consider<br />Who were the Carolingians and what did they leave behind for Western Europe?<br />What cultures inspired the Carolingians?<br />Who were the Ottonians and what did they instill in Western European culture?<br />How does the Gero Crucifix differ from earlier Christian images of Christ?<br />

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