Using togaf™ in government_enterprise_architecture_to_describe_the_business_architecture_02_nov11

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Using togaf™ in government_enterprise_architecture_to_describe_the_business_architecture_02_nov11

  1. 1. Using The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) in Government Enterprise Architecture to Describe the Business Architecture –US Government Federal Enterprise Architecture / Federal Segment Architecture Methodology (FEA/FSAM) as an Example Presented by John Polgreen, Ph.D. Architecting the Enterprise Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  2. 2. Welcome! Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  3. 3. Agenda Introductions Presentation  Introduction to TOGAF with FEA/FSAM  Setting the Stage by Visioning  Conducting the Business Architecture  Steps  Artifacts created Case Studies Panel Discussion / Q&A Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  4. 4. Who’s WhoPresenterJohn Polgreen Architecting the EnterpriseModeratorSimon Lofthouse The Open GroupPanelistsJudith Jones Architecting the EnterpriseEd Harrington Architecting the EnterpriseRafal Jablonka Architecting the EnterpriseGreg Lettow ComponentWaveJim Odrowski ComponentWaveAleks Buterman SenseagilityRobert Weisman Build the VisionDavid Epperly ArchangelIT Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  5. 5. Our Approach Descriptive, not Critical Not in Scope  Nature of EA – do we  Align IT with Business  Architect the Enterprise  Nature of Business Architecture – is it  A separate domain  Holistic sum of all domains  Status of the Business Architecture Profession – is it  Part of EA  Part of Strategic Planning Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  6. 6. Primacy of Business ArchitectureBusiness-led architecture is more successful in meetingstrategic goals, responding to changing mission needs,and serving citizens’ expectations than technology- orbudget- driven architecture. FEA Practice Guidance Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  7. 7. The Situation FEA/FSAM very business driven FEA has well defined reference architecture for business OMB, CIO Council has provided guidance on process FSAM provides guidance for segment architecturesBut architects may need… More granular process information More templates, examples of outputs Common language Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  8. 8. A Potential SolutionAugment Practice Guidance, FEA, FSAM with TOGAF TOGAF ADM has a well defined process for business architecture Templates and formats for outputs available Accepted globally – provides common language Popular EA tools have FEA and TOGAF modules TOGAF maps well to FEA, FSAM and FEA Guidance TOGAF is meant to to be tailored – don’t throw anything away TOGAF ADM can also map to DoDAF Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  9. 9. TOGAF 9 The Open Group Architecture Framework, v 9 Developed by consensus in The Open Group Federal roots - DoD’s TAFIM Architecture Development Method is well proven 80% of Fortune 50 use TOGAF Wide public sector use  UK Government  New York State Well accepted among Federal contractors Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  10. 10. Developing EA with TOGAF Preliminary A Enterprise Continuum H B G Requirements Management CArchitecture Development Method F D E Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  11. 11. FEA Reference ArchitecturesApproachBusiness-Driven Performance Reference Model (PRM) Architecture Component-Based Business Reference Model (BRM) Service Component Reference Model (SRM) Data Reference Model (DRM) Technical Reference Model (TRM) Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  12. 12. Mapping FEA Practice Guidance to the TOGAF ADMADM Phases ADM Phase ADM PhasesPreliminary E – Opportunities and F- MigrationA – Vision Solutions G – ImplementationB – Business Architecture GovernanceC – Information Architecture H – ChangeD – Technology Architecture ManagementRequirements Management Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  13. 13. US Federal Segments and Services Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  14. 14. FSAM to TOGAF ADM Mapping Phase A Vision Phase B Business Architecture Phases C-D Data, Application, Technology Phases E-F Architectures Opportunities and Solution, Migration Planning14 TOGAF ADM Phase FSAM Step Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  15. 15. USDA Case Study Conclusions“TOGAF and the FEA provided a good combination for planning a largegovernment-based modernization project.” Greg Lettow, Jim Odrowski Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  16. 16. Applying TOGAF to FEA/FSAM Strategic Architecture Strategic ADM iteration  Tailor FEA reference models Preliminary A  Develop strategic architecture H Architecture Change Management Architecture Vision B Business Architecture  Mile wide, inch deep Segment Architecture(s) G Requirements CC Information Information System Implementation System Management Architectures Governance Architectures  To-be states in all domains Preliminary F D  Gaps Preliminary Preliminary Migration Planning E Opportunities Technology Architecture A & Solutions Architecture  Transition Strategy H Architecture Change H Architecture Management H Vision A Architecture Vision A B Architecture BusinessB Vision Architecture Change Architecture Business B Management Architecture Subsequent ADM iterations Change Business Management C Architecture C G Information Information C Requirements System C Implementation G Governance Implementation G Management Requirements System Information Architectures C Information Architectures C System Information System Information Capability Architectures Management Requirements Architectures Governance System Architectures  Describe segments Implementation System Management Architectures Governance Architectures F D Migration Technology F D Planning Architecture Preliminary Migration F E TechnologyD  Describe other enterprise projects Migration Opportunities Planning Architecture Technology Preliminary E Planning & Solutions Architecture Preliminary Opportunities E & Solutions Opportunities A & Solutions Architecture H A Vision  Collectively describe rich EA Architecture Architecture A B H Change Vision Architecture Business Architecture H B Management Change Vision Architecture Business Architecture B Management Change Architecture Business Management C Architecture C G Information Information C Implementation Requirements System C System Information G Governance Management Requirements Architectures C Information Architectures C Implementation System Information System G Management Information Governance Requirements Architectures System Architectures Implementation System Management Architectures Governance Architectures F D Migration TechnologyD F Planning E Architecture Technology Migration F D Migration Opportunities Planning E Architecture Technology Planning & Solutions E Opportunities Architecture & Solutions Opportunities & Solutions Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  17. 17. Grants Architecture for Agency X Agency X gives grants to qualified residents They need to improve all aspects of their grants program They wish to use Grants.gov as a template Immediate need is to improve grant disbursement capability Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  18. 18. Steps of the Vision Phase Establish Architecture Project Preliminary Identify Stakeholders Concerns & Requirements Confirm Business Goals, Drivers & Constraints A Evaluate Business Capabilities Assess Readiness for Business Transformation H B Define Scope Confirm Principles Requirements Develop Architecture VisionG Management C Define Target Architecture Value Proposition Identify Business Transformation Risks F D Develop Statement of Architecture Work E Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  19. 19. Example Stakeholder MapSLIDE 19 of 34 Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  20. 20. Steps of Vision Phase Establish Architecture Project Preliminary Identify Stakeholders Concerns & Requirements Confirm Business Goals, Drivers & Constraints A Evaluate Business Capabilities Assess Readiness for Business Transformation H B Define Scope Confirm Principles Requirements Develop Architecture VisionG Management C Define Target Architecture Value Proposition Identify Business Transformation Risks F D Develop Statement of Architecture Work E Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  21. 21. Business Transformation Readiness AssessmentSLIDE 21 Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  22. 22. Steps of the Vision Phase Establish Architecture Project Preliminary Identify Stakeholders Concerns & Requirements Confirm Business Goals, Drivers & Constraints A Evaluate Business Capabilities Assess Readiness for Business Transformation H B Define Scope Confirm Principles Requirements Develop Architecture VisionG Management C Define Target Architecture Value Proposition Identify Business Transformation Risks F D Develop Statement of Architecture Work E Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  23. 23. Value Chain Diagram Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  24. 24. Solution Concept Diagram Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  25. 25. Steps of the Vision Phase Establish Architecture Project Preliminary Identify Stakeholders Concerns & Requirements Confirm Business Goals, Drivers & Constraints A Evaluate Business Capabilities Assess Readiness for Business Transformation H B Define Scope Confirm Principles Requirements Develop Architecture VisionG Management C Define Target Architecture Value Proposition Identify Business Transformation Risks F D Develop Statement of Architecture Work E Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  26. 26. Business Reference Model DefinitionThe BRM provides a framework facilitating a functional (rather thanorganizational) view of the federal government’s lines of business (LoBs),including its internal operations and its services for citizens, independent ofthe agencies, bureaus and offices performing them. Consolidated Reference ModelsIn many governments, horizontal interoperability and shared services areemerging as cornerstones of their e-Government implementations andcapability-based management is also prominent although under many guises. TOGAF 9 Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  27. 27. BRM Overview Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  28. 28. Business Architecture Phase Preliminary A Business Architecture • Describe As-is BRM • Describe To-be BRM H B • Conduct Gap Analysis • Populate PRM Indicators G Requirements C Management F D E Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  29. 29. Steps of the Business Architecture Phase Select Reference Models, Viewpoints Preliminary Develop Baseline Description A Develop Target Description H B Perform Gap Analysis Business Define Roadmap ComponentsG Requirements C Resolve Impacts Management Conduct Stakeholder Review Finalize the Architecture F D E Create Architecture Definition Document Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  30. 30. Taxonomy of Artifacts part of the Content FrameworkArchitecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  31. 31. Commonalities – TOGAF Artifacts with FSAM Many artifacts are common to both  business function model  business value chain  business process model  conceptual data model  business data mapped to key business processes Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  32. 32. Actor/Role Matrix Business Unit 3rd Party Implementation Actors Actors Actors Technical Business Architecture Procurement Solution Design Service ServiceActivity Project Team Team Commercial Provider Authority Introduction ManagementPublish functional requirements AR C Publish non-functionalrequirements AR C C C IPublish logical architecture A C R IProvide reference architecture &guidelines ARIssue RFP or specification (asappropriate) R C A I CComplete QG2 checklist C C I C AR I Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  33. 33. Business Interaction Matrix Providing Organisation Unit Sales, Procurement and Human Resources Customer Service General Counsel Manufacturing Engineering Customer Service Time-to-Market Enterprise Enterprise Management & Management & Support Support Sales, Procurement and Customer Service Sales & Marketing Build-to-Order Enterprise EnterpriseConsuming Organisation Unit Manufacturing Management & Management & Support Support Engineering Time-to-Market Enterprise Supplier Supplier Collaboration Management & Collaboration Support Enterprise Management & Support Human Resources Enterprise Management & Support General Counsel Enterprise Management & Support Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  34. 34. Data Entity / Business Function MatrixLogical Data Components Map to Business Functions Business Function 1 Business Function 2 Business Function 3 Business Function 4Logical Data Entity 1Logical Data Entity 2Logical Data Entity 3Logical Data Entity 4Logical Data Entity 5Logical Data Entity 6 Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  35. 35. BusinessFootprintDiagram Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  36. 36. Service/Information Diagram Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  37. 37. Functional Decomposition Diagram Support Primary Human Marketing Business Admin Finance & Engineering Inventory Manufacturing Distribution Resources Planning SalesManage Public Develop & Track Plan Human Formulate Develop New Research and Plan Material Plan Engineer Develop Manufacturing Relations Financial Plan Resources Strategy Business Technology Requirements Requirements Packages Acquire Develop and Establish Procure Provide Legal Appropriate Engineer and Perform Quality Ship Human Maintain Customer Equipment Services Funds Resources Business Plan Design Products Material & Tools Engineering Products Requirements Perform Develop & Develop Obtain Sales Engineer and Manage Convert Audit Manage Design Resources & Controls Product Cost Employees Commitments Processes Suppliers to Product Provide Provide Manage Manage Design Tools Manage Control Employee CustomerTransportation Payables Services Support and Equipment Inventory Production Manage Maintain Plant Maintain Manage Manage Union Engineering Equipment & Facilities Receivables Activities Changes Tools Provide Manage Terminate Active Warranty Administrative Manage Assets Services Employment Activities Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  38. 38. Steps of the Business Architecture Phase Select Reference Models, Viewpoints Preliminary Develop Baseline Description A Develop Target Description H B Perform Gap Analysis Business Define Roadmap Components Resolve ImpactsG Requirements C Conduct Stakeholder Review Management Finalize the Architecture F D Create Architecture Definition Document E Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  39. 39. Value Proposition: TOGAF Business Architecture TOGAF ADM Business Phase maps well to FEA/FSAM  provides needed process detail TOGAF supplies templates and examples TOGAF is an open standard  technology and vendor neutral  intended to be tailored  Inexpensive to use Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  40. 40. Value Proposition: TOGAF Business Architecture TOGAF is industry standard Consulting resources are available  10,000+ TOGAF Certified Architects globally  Many among large Federal contractors  Small firms also available TOGAF simplifies communication with  Architecture teams  Vendors  Consultants Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  41. 41. Next Steps For the Community  Study federal EA business architecture problems – is TOGAF a fit? For Agencies  Visit www.opengroup.org – download TOGAF  Get someone on your EA team trained/certified  Tailor the FEA/FSAM using TOGAF  Develop, implement and manage your business architecture Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  42. 42. USDA Agency A Vision Development USDA recognizes TOGAF alongside FEA Agency A needed to begin an EA program to satisfy OMB CIO was very supportive – supported ADM – started Vision Phase  went with me to 10 Offices  Had me conduct interviews  Held Vision Workshop  Supported development of Vision Document Vision very well received Vision immediately used by CPIC for purchase decisions Some difficulty moving past Vision  Vision was ‘slick’ - confused with full EA  Business owners reluctant to detail Business Architecture Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  43. 43. USDA Agency B – Bus Arch Driving IT Modernization Key Catalogs  Driver / Goal / Objective (based on FEA-PRM)  Bus Svc / Function Catalog (based on FEA-BRM)  Current Systems Catalog  Requirements Catalog Key Matrices  Performance Objectives (FEA-PRM) to Business Functions (FEA-BRM)  Current Systems to Business Functions (FEA-BRM)  Target Requirements to Business Functions (FEA-BRM) Insights / Benefits  Bus Arch is foundation for scoping and Bus / IT alignment  Current to Target matrices facilitated migration planning  Answered key questions: Bus. areas under-supported? Areas most important? High IT costs / duplication? System migration targets? Commonality across domain?► Jim Odrowski & Greg Lettow - ComponentWave, Inc. Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  44. 44. Business Architecture at GSA Context: ONE GSA EA developed by Data Access Technologies, Inc.  Mile wide – inch deep view of the entire agency  Based primarily on a “Value Chain” perspective modeled in accordance with the OMG Model Driven Architecture (MDA) at the highest (CIM) level  Equivalent to a TOGAF 9’s Business Architecture at the Strategic level Resulted in the definition on numerous Business Segments  Vertical - the Businesses of the Agency: PBS and FSS  Horizontal – supporting the Agency: Finance, HR, Acquisition, etc. Next were “deep dives” into a number of the segments (still ongoing)  Always initially from a top-down Business perspective (MDA – CIM)  Then developed a platform independent model (OMG PIM) equivalent to TOGAF 9’s Data and Applications Architecture  Finally a platform specific model (OMG PSM) equivalent to TOGAF 9’s Technical Architecture Key benefit: “Line of Site”: from Business to Technology and back Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  45. 45. Poland Government Example One attempt to create a government EA framework based on TOGAF in 2006, abandoned after the nearest ellections... Some top-level regulations touching EA matters exist – resulting from European Interoperability Framework – with not so visible impact in real-world Currently – in terms of EA and TOGAF - ‘bottom-up’ approach works pretty OK – several ministries using fragments of TOGAF on the project / system level. A few trying to implement bits of EA governance, content framework and adapt ADM – in conjunction with Prince2 and ITIL The most active departments: Min. of Finance (tax and customs), Min. of Health, Min. of Labour&Social Security, Min. of Interior  No formal recognition of TOGAF as mandated framework, but...  Proven TOGAF knowledge and excpectation of its „appropriate use” start to be a default requirements in majority of big tenders for systems delivery  Main goal is to harmonise e-government initiatives and enable them to utilise a cross-government integration platform (which is being built by the Ministry of Interior), in a common, unified way Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  46. 46. Poland Government ExampleMessages: Even without centralised, top level FEAF–like framework and organisation, usage of TOGAF brings similar perspective, language and understanding into otherwise isolated initiatives Suppliers appreciate when administration “speaks” TOGAF – this means that chances for “civilsied” co-operation and fruitful project completion are bigger Start small, grow when you can! Starting from defining principles, fixed set of well-defined artifacts and products (consistently requested in every new project, and in a form of a repository!), and nominating 2-4 people devoted to EA and TOGAF can make a huge difference... Ministeries “borrow” from each other eagerly... When something works fine in one place, others will follow without waiting for the command from the top (usually...) Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  47. 47. Business Architecture Providing a Context for Business Value for the Enterprise Business Government Outcomes Value Business Strategic Departmental Outcomes Value Business Core Program Outcomes Value Business Architecture Business Mandated Programs Value Focus Defining Business Business Critical Enablers Value Value BusinessEnabling Internal Services ValuePrograms Detailed Business Requirements Info Mgt Info Tech HR, Fin, … Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010
  48. 48. Questions?Panelist Contact InformationJohn Polgreen johnpolgreen@architecting-the-enterprise.comJudith Jones judith@architecting-the-enterprise.comEd Harrington Ed.Harrington@architecting-the-enterprise.comRafal Jablonka Rafal Jablonka@architecting-the-enterprise.comGreg Lettow glettow@componentwave.comJim Odrowski jodrowski@componentwave.comAleks Buterman aleks.buterman@senseagility.comRobert Weisman robert.weisman@buildthevision.caDavid Epperly david.epperly@archangelit.com Architecting the Enterprise Limited Copyright © 2010

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