teAM:PHΙLOSOPHY
suBJECT:SIGMUND FREUD
VLACHOS NEKTARIOS
Born: Sigismund Schlomo Freud
6 May 1856
Freiberg in Mähren , Moravia,
Austrian Empire
(now Příbor , Czech Republic)
Died:...
He was
an Austrian neurologist who
became known as the founding
father of psychoanalysis.
Psychoanalysis is a clinical
met...
The conscious
The conscious mind is what you are
aware of at any particular moment, your
present perceptions, memories, th...
The
Unconscious
It was first introduced in connection
with the phenomenon of repression, to
explain what happens to ideas ...
The id, the ego, and the superego
The id (="the It“)
is the completely
unconscious,
impulsive,
childlike portion
of the ps...
When ego is overburdened or threatened
by its tasks, it may employ defense
mechanisms including denial repression,
undoing...
Dreams
Freud believed that the function of
dreams is to preserve sleep by
representing as fulfilled wishes that would
othe...
The great question that has never
been answered, and which I have not
yet been able to answer, despite my
thirty years of ...
He was influenced by:
Aristotle, Börne, Brentano,Breuer, Charco,
Darwin,Dostoyevsky, Empedocles, Fliess,
Goethe, Haeckel, ...
GIANNOULIS SOZOS
B‟1
Project 2013-‟14
 Bertrand Arthur William Russell was born at Trelleck on 18th
May, 1872. At the age of three he was left an orphan. His f...
•He was a British philosopher , mathematician and
pacifist . Russell as a writer and man continued the
family tradition in...
 In this volume Bertrand Russell outlines
the basic tenets of his political code.
Political Ideals is an important survey...
• Typical dislike towards any kind of
fanaticism is the statement: “There
will never die for my ideas ,because I
may have ...
 Russell's activism against British participation
in World War I led to fines, a loss of freedom
of travel within Britain...
 In 1955, Russell released the Russell-Einstein
Manifesto, co-signed by Albert Einstein and nine
other leading scientists...
 The Bertrand Russell Peace
Foundation was established in 1963. The
foundation aims to continue the work of
the philosoph...
 Russell died of influenza on 2 February 1970
at his home in Wales.
 In 1980 a memorial to Russell was
commissioned by a...
Philosopher
BY ANTHONY KASSIS
He was born in 15 of October 1844 grew up in a small town in
Prussia and his parents where Carl Ludwig Nietzsche and
Franz...
 He attended a boys' school and thena private
school. Τhere he learned Greek Latin Hebrew
and French and was also was com...
 Nietzche was mostly affected by the work of
philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer.
 Other affections may come from David
Stra...
 The major part of his work concearn morals
and how it was formed through the ages.
 He is mostly known about his ideas ...
 God is dead. God remains dead. And we have
killed him. Yet his shadow still looms. How shall
we comfort ourselves, the m...
 According to Lampert, "the death of God must be
followed by a long twilight of piety and nihilism.
Zarathustra's gift of...
 A basic element in Nietzsche's philosophical
outlook and is an indication of his deep
understanding of human behavior
 ...
 This is the concept which Nietzsche himself
believes is the most important of his ideas.
 It is the idea that the unive...
 He has affected mankind in a different and
not completely good way and has been a
philosopher analyzed by many mostly ov...
People of the 20th century that
have affected the
Western Culture
Herbert Marcuse (1898–1979) was
one of the most prominent
members of the Frankfurt School
or The Institute for Social
Rese...
 Herbert Marcuse was born on July 19, 1898 in Berlin.
 Marcuse studied at the universities of Berlin and Freiburg.
 He ...
 Main interests
 Social theory
 Socialism
 Industrialism
 Technology
 Notable ideas
 Totally
administered
society,
...
 The bookends of Marcuse's literary,
philosophical, and political life are both works
on aesthetics. In 1922 he completed...
•The work offers a wide-ranging critique of both
contemporary capitalism and the Communist society of the
Soviet Union, do...
 Herbert Marcuse died in July 29,1979.
 His works that he left was:
 Hegel's Ontology and Theory of Historicity (1932) ...
Project 2013-14
Albert Einstein‟s Life
Andreas Marinakis
"Any intelligent fool can make things bigger,
more complex, and more violent. It takes a
touch of genius -- and a lot of c...
Albert was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, in the
Germans Empire.
Albert was a typical boy in elementary school with
diffic...
When his fathers company failed in 1894, his
family moved to different places.
He then decided to stay in Munich to finish...
Einstein met Mileva Marić the same year he enrolled at the
Polytechnic. Over the years their friendship developed into
rom...
After completing his thesis with Alfred Kleiner, Albert was
awarded a PhD by the University of Zurich.
Annus_Mirabilis
Tha...
Einstein was forced to leave Germany and
enter the U.S due to the new Chancellor,
Adolf Hitler.
Albert had never felt so J...
Before the beginning of World War II, Albert
was forced to write a letter to the president
of the United States, to inform...
On April 17, 1955 Albert suffered from internal
bleeding caused by the rupture of an
abdominal aortic aneurysm.
Albert did...
During the autopsy, the pathologist removed
Einstein‟s brain without the permission of his
family in hope that neuroscienc...
Project 2013-14
Albert Einstein
Albert Einstein Theories
Hercules Karagiannis
 Produced 4 revolutionary papers
 1. Particle Nature: Nature of light can be explained
through math (contradicts prior b...
 Theory of Special relativity said that in
certain situations space and time are
relative
 This contradicted many belief...
 General Relativity states that gravity
distorts spacetime mathematically his
theories were correct needed proof used
pic...
 Einstein motivated many Scientists including
Niels Bohr
 Bohr was motivated by Einstein to study
atoms and radiation
 ...
 Einstein wanted to connect the
electromagnetic field and gravitational field
to prove this was supposed to disprove Bohr...
 1939: Einstein was convinced by European researchers
that his theory of mass energy equivalence could lead to
the creati...
 Imagination is more important than knowledge.
 The only reason for time is so that everything doesn't
happen at once.
...
 Einstein was the most influential scientist of
modern time and possibly ever
 Although his theories are difficult for t...
IO
VOSSINIOT
I
 Tim Burton is an
American film director.
 He use comedy in order to
express tragedy.
 Many of his films are
based on h...
 Burton start making short films
in his backyard on Evergreen
Street using crude stop motion
animation techniques or shoo...
 Beginning
 Often does the beginning
credits sequence with the
camera going through
something or following
something
 H...
Ios Vosinioti
2013-2014
FANTASIA ΓΕΛ-ΑΙΓΗΝΑΣ
Fathers are portrayed in a negative
light in his films. Whether they be
dead (Batman(1989)), purposely
ditched their child...
Characters often wear striped
clothing, particularly black-and-
white stripes (for example,
Beetlejuice, Sweeney and Mrs.
...
Often shows factory assembly
line sequences (e.g. Edward
Scissorhands(1990),Charlie
and the Chocolate Factory
(2005) and 9...
 His films often have a
Gothic feel to them, often
including Christmas and/or
Halloween scenes.
 Plot often focuses arou...
 Frequently features dead
or dismembered dogs
 Many of his films feature
townspeople who
misunderstand and
distrust the ...
 Obsession with horror
actors: he makes movies
about them
(Vincent (1982), Ed Wood
(1994)), or he actually
casts them in ...
 Most his films tend to be
either dark or colorful,
and sometimes contain
scenes of both.
 Affectionate homages to
the f...
 Effective use of musical
interludes
 Extremely dark Gothic
atmosphere in buildings
and set design
 Many of his films
p...
 His antagonists are often
coldly superior, brutal and
thuggish but avoid getting
noticed by other
characters
 His heroe...
Jeffrey Jones, Paul
Reubens, Glenn Shadix, Michael
Keaton, Lisa Marie,Johnny
Depp, Helena Bonham
Carter, Michael Gough, De...
Tim Burton’s most famous
movies are:
* Beetlejuice (1988)
* Batman (1989)
* Edward Scissorhands (1990)
*The Nightmare befo...
 Timothy Walter Burton was born in 1958, in the city of Burbank,
California
 His mother is Jean Burton, the owner of a c...
 After graduating from Burbank High School with Jeff
Riekenberg, Burton attended the California Institute of the
Arts to ...
Early career: 1980s
 Burton graduated from CalArts in Santa Clarita, California in
1979. The success of his short film St...
 While at Disney in 1982, Burton made his first short,
Vincent, a six-minute black-and-white stop motion film
based on a ...
 In 2009, the short went on display in the Museum of
Modern Art, and in 2011 the short also played at the Tim
Burton art ...
 Pursuing then an opportunity to make a full-length film, he was
approached by Griffin Dunne to direct the black comedy f...
 While on the set of Planet of the Apes (2001),
Burton met Helena Bonham Carter, to whom
he is now currently engaged and ...
 His early film career was
fueled by almost unbelievable
good luck, but it's his talent
and originality that have kept
hi...
 "I remember when I was younger, I had these
two windows in my room, nice windows that
looked out onto the lawn, and for ...
 "There was one moment, and it happened in
school. I had a big final exam--we were
supposed to write a 20-page report on ...
Did you know
that Burton use
to draw Edward
Scissorhands ,
sinse he was 16
without
knowing that
this character
will be the...
Team: FANTASIA
ΓΕΛ.ΑΙΓΙΝΑΣ
Όλγα Ζωγράφου
 He made silent and black and white films.
 Because of his sad childhood , he tried (and achieved) to make films with ha...
 He was known worldwide by the nickname
Charlie and in Greece as „„Charlot‟‟.
 He was an English actor and director who
...
 The Great Dictator
 The kid
 Shoulder Arms
 City lights
 Modern times
 He was born in London, England.
 Both of his parents were artists Music Hall
called Charles Chaplin and Hannah Harriet
...
 He had miserable childhood. Due to his mother‟s
sickness and consequently her resignation from her
work, they were made ...
 His first contact with the art was in the age
of five when he replaced his sick mother for
a show. He sang a famous song...
 I suppose that‟s one of the ironies of life
doing the wrong thing at the right time.
 We think too much and feel too li...
 My pain may be the reason for somebody‟s laugh.
But my laugh must never be the reason for
somebody‟s pain.
 Life is a m...
 ‘‘ You need power only when you want to do
something harmful , otherwise love is
enough to get everything done.’’
Styling
 We all wonder why Charlie was dressed in this strange
and at the same time funny way.
 The answer is that once ...
 In an interview he said : ‘‘
I had no idea of the
character . But the
moment I was dressed ,
the clothes and the make-
u...
The first time that Charlie got
an Oscar he won the longest
applause of the history of the
awards . Total ,he won four
Osc...
In the early morning of Christmas 1977,
Charlie Chaplin died in his sleep. He was 88
years old.
After his death, the direc...
However , how many years go by, Charles will
always have a special place in our hearts. He will
teach us again and again t...
FANTASIA
Joanna Kaklamanou B1
2013-2014
ΓΕΛ ΑΙΓΙΝΑΣ
 Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was an English film
director and producer.
 He pioneered many techniques in the suspense an...
 Over a career spanning more than six decades,
Hitchcock directed more than fifty films.
 He pioneered the use of a came...
 His stories often feature fugitives on the run from
the law alongside "icy blonde" female characters.
 Many of Hitchcoc...
 Hair
He likes to insert shots of a woman's hairstyle,
frequently in close-ups.
 Bathrooms
Often a plot device as a hidi...
 MacGuffin
It is a plot device in the form of a desired object
that the protagonist pursues. The most common type
of MacG...
 Blondes
The most famous actresses in his filmography were
Joan Fontaine
Grace Kelly
Kim Novak
Ingrid Bergman
Tippi Hedren
Vera Miles
 Cameo (= A crew member of a movie playing a
minor role)
Hitchcock often has a quick cameo in his films. He
made a live c...
Fans would make sport of trying to spot his cameos.
He eventually began making his appearances within
the first half-hour ...
Hitchcock’s most famous movies are:
The man who knew too much (1934,1956)
The 39 steps (1935)
The lady vanishes (1938)
...
 He was born in 1899 in England.
 His father was a green grocer called William
Hitchcock and his mother was Emma Jane
Wh...
 In 1914, when he was 15 years old, his father
died.
 In the same year, he left St. Ignatius to study at
the London Coun...
 In 1920s , Hitchcock joined the film industry.
 He started off drawing the sets (he was a very
skilled artist).
 His f...
 In 1926, Hitchcock directed his first thriller,
The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog.
 The film, released in January 1...
 In 1933, Hitchcock was working at Gaumont-British
Picture Corporation.
 His first film for the company, The Man Who Kne...
 On December of 1926, Hitchcock married his
assistant director, Alma Reville, in South
Kensington, London.
 Their only c...
 By the end of the 1930s Hitchcock's reputation was
beginning to soar overseas, with a New York
Times feature writer stat...
 In March 1939, Hitchcock signed a seven-year
contract moved to Hollywood with his family.
 In 1940, he made his first A...
 Hitchcock's films during the 1940s were
diverse, ranging from the romantic comedy
Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941) to the courtro...
 In 1955, Hitchcock became a United States citizen.
 The film, To Catch a Thief (1955) was Hitchcock's
last film starrin...
 Hitchcock successfully remade his own
film The Man Who Knew Too Much in 1956.
 This time, the film starred Doris Day, w...
Psycho is almost certainly Hitchcock's best-known
film.
 Psycho was shot in black-and-white on a spare set
and it was the...
 It broke box-office records in China and the rest
of Asia, France, Britain, South America and
the United States.
The unprecedented violence of the
shower scene, the early death of the
heroine and the innocent lives
extinguished by a d...
 Hitchcock died in his Bel Air home of renal
failure on April 1980.
 Hitchcock's funeral was held at a Catholic Church
i...
Hitchcock was a multiple nominee and winner of a
number of prestigious awards, receiving two Golden
Globes, eight Laurel A...
 He had also been nominated five times for, albeit
never winning, an Academy Award as Best Director.
 His film Rebecca w...
 Variety magazine referred to him as, "probably the
best native director in England."
 Hitchcock's innovations and visio...
Hitchcock (2012)
The Girl (2012)
1st High School of Aegina
Team: Death deities
School Year: 2013-2014
Project
Members: With the great director Alexandra Ta...
Asterix (French:
Astérix) is a fictional
character, the titular
hero of the French
comic book series
The Adventures of
Ast...
Created by Max
Fleischer; an
American animator
and film maker
Cartoons
made by
Fleischer:
Betty Boop,
Superman,
Koko the
c...
Betty Boop is an
animated cartoon
character
appearing in
the Talkartoon an
d Betty Boop
series of films
produced by Max
Fl...
First female flapper cartoon
ever First appearance: August 9 ,1930 in the cartoon
dizzy dishes
#the sixth installment
in F...
In keeping with common
practice, Natwick made his
new character an animal, in
this case, a French poodle
Beginning with th...
first cartoon character to fully represent a sexual
woman
Revealed her sexuality in contrast with other female
cartoon cha...
In the end,
Betty's
heightened
sexuality
would spell
her doom.
The Production
Code censorship
laws enforced
beginning in
1...
The Little Mermaid (Ariel)
Ariel is the title character of Walt Disney Pictures' 28th animated film
The Little Mermaid (19...
The character is based on the title character of Hans Christian Andersen's "The
Little Mermaid" story, but was developed i...
Ariel is the youngest
and seventh
daughter of King
Triton and Queen
Athena, rulers of
Atlantica, and has six
older sisters...
Ariel is often rebellious,
wandering off on her
own to explore her
surroundings, and
frequently disobeys the
orders of her...
Ariel is kind to others no matter what their circumstances, as
depicted in the television series. In an early episode, Ari...
Ariel appears as an adult in Return to the Sea, and gives birth to a daughter named
Melody. Ariel is protective of her dau...
FIGURES THAT AFFECTED THE CURRENT WESTERN CULTURE
COCO CHANEL SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR
Coco
Chanel
ΓΕΛ ΑΙΓΙΝΑΣ
ΣΦΟΛΙΚΟ ΕΤΟΣ
2013-2014
ΕΡΕΥΝΗΤΙΚΗ
ΕΡΓΑΣΙΑ
Biography
• Gabrielle Bonheur "Coco" Chanel was born in 1883.Chanel was born into
poverty in Saumur, France, and was taugh...
Contribution to Femininity Through Fashion
• “I freed the body,” Coco Chanel once declared. And she did indeed, she create...
Chanel's Impact on the Fashion World
• As an individual, Coco is regarded as a genius and fashion icon. Coco is not
rememb...
de Beauv
oir
Born: 9 January 1908
Paris , France
Died: 14, April 1986
(aged 78) Paris,
France
Partner:Jean Paul
Sartre
Rel...
existentialist
philosopher, a public
intellectual, political
activist and a social and
feminist writer.
Simone wrote
numer...
SBeauvoir began her
education in the
private Catholic
school for girls, the
Institut Adeline Désir
where she remained
unti...
•Beauvoir passed the
baccalauréat exams in
mathematics and philosophy in
1925.•She studied
mathematics at the
Institut Cat...
•Studying philosophy at the
Sorbonne, Beauvoir passed
exams for :
•Certificates in History of
Philosophy,
• General Philos...
Leibniz (German rationalist
philosopher) Léon Brunschvig and
completed her practice teaching at
the lycée Janson-de-Sailly...
At 21 years of age, Beauvoir was the youngest student ever to pass the agrégation in philosophy and thus became the younge...
EARLY
LIFE•Simone de Beauvoir was a
precocious and
intellectually curious
child from the beginning.
•In addition to her ow...
•Beauvoir had been a deeply religious
child as a result of her education and
her mother‟s training; however, at the
age of...
One of her greatest achievement
in life was her relationship with
the philosopher Jean -Paul Sartre
For the rest of their lives, they were
to remain “essential” lovers.
Although never marrying (despite
sartre‟s proposal in...
THE SECOND
SEX
The Second Sex, recognized as one of the hundred most
important works of the twentieth century and one of
h...
•The main thesis of The Second Sex
revolves around the idea that woman has
been held in a relationship of long-
standing o...
•The book is divided into two major
themes.
•in Book i, entitled “facts and myths,”
she asks how “female humans” come to
o...
The most philosophically rich
discussion of Book I comes in
Beauvoir‟s analysis of myths (third
part).
There she tackles t...
The second book , entitled “woman‟s life today
”Begins with Beauvoir‟s most famous assertion,
“one is not Born, But rather...
•woman‟s passivity and alienation are
explored in what Beauvoir entitles her
“situation and character” and her
“justificat...
•at the last part called „‟toward
liBeration „‟ she emphasiZes the
fact that women need access to
the same kinds of activi...
..everything we
are is the result
of our choices, as
we build
ourselves out of
our own
resources and
those which
society g...
Meaning..
Beauvoir: That being a woman is not
a natural fact .it‟s the result of a
certain history .there is no
biological...
•De Beauvoir researched
and wrote the book in about
14 months when she was 38
years old .• Published in 1949 The
Second Se...
Other works she is famous for:
The
Mandarins(196
1) Beauvoir was awarded the
Prix Goncourt prize in 1954
for it.
She Cam...
The Ethics of Ambiguity(1948)
The Coming of Age
Memoirs of a
Dutiful Daughter
(autobiography)
1958
The Prime of
Life, 1960
A Very Easy Death, 1964
Letters to Sartr
QUOTES
Man is defined as a
human being and a
woman as a female -
whenever she behaves
as a human being she
is said to imitate the...
Femininity is merely an acquired set of
characteristics that a woman learns necessarily
within the family and outside in s...
FIGURES THAT AFFECTED
THE NEWEST WESTERN
CIVILIZATION
ΜΑΡΙΑ ΜΠΟΓΡΗ
ΑΝΑ΢ΣΑ΢ΙΑ ΧΑΜΑΛΑΚΗ
Present
BILL GATES
William Henry "Bill" Gates III (born October
28, 1955) is an American business
magnate, investor, programmer, nventor
and ...
 In the later stages of his career, Gates has
pursued a number of philanthropic endeavors,
donating large amounts of mone...
2013 TOP 10 BILLIONAIRES
No. Name Net worth (USD) Age Citizenship Source(s) of wealth
1 Carlos Slim $73.0 billion 73 Mexic...
EARLY LIFE
 Gates comes from a family with a prominent
background as his father was a famous lawyer, his
mother served on...
HIS LOVE ABOUT COMPUTERS
 Gates took his first interest in
programming when he was at he
Lakeside when he tried to progra...
MICROSOFT
Microsoft was founded by Bill
Gates and Paul Allen on April 4, 1975
to develop and
sell BASIC interpreters for A...
 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF or the Gates Foundation) is the
largest private foundation in the world, founded ...
 In 2007, its founders were ranked as
the second most generous
philanthropists in America, and
Warren Buffett the first. ...
The Bill Gates, referring to the Foundation
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, he says
: Melinda and I , we talked about it,...
 It is not related with any particular religion. It
has to do with human dignity and equality.
The golden rule is that al...
BILL GATES QUOTES
SUMMARY
 Bill gates is admired by a number of people for his
career, his fortune and his luxury lifestyle
 However he sh...
The End
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A study into selected personalities from arts and sciences nearly past or contemporary , examining the influence these people wielded as to setting positive trends and looking into how they changed our lives for the better .

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  • FIGURES
  • important figures

    1. 1. teAM:PHΙLOSOPHY suBJECT:SIGMUND FREUD VLACHOS NEKTARIOS
    2. 2. Born: Sigismund Schlomo Freud 6 May 1856 Freiberg in Mähren , Moravia, Austrian Empire (now Příbor , Czech Republic) Died:23 September 1939 (aged 83) London, England Nationality:Austrian Fields: Neurology Psychotherapy Psychoanalysis Institutions: University of Vienna Known for: Psychoanalysis Notable awards: Goethe Prize (1930) Foreign Member of the Royal Society (London) Spouse: Martha Bernays (m. 1886–1939, his death)
    3. 3. He was an Austrian neurologist who became known as the founding father of psychoanalysis. Psychoanalysis is a clinical method for treating psychopathology through dialogue between a patient and a psychoanalyst
    4. 4. The conscious The conscious mind is what you are aware of at any particular moment, your present perceptions, memories, thoughts, fantasies, feelings, what have you. His Theories:
    5. 5. The Unconscious It was first introduced in connection with the phenomenon of repression, to explain what happens to ideas that are repressed. It includes all the things that are not easily available to awareness, including many things that have their origins there, such as our drives or instincts, and things that are put there because we can't bear to look at them, such as the memories and emotions associated with trauma. The unconscious is the source of our motivations, whether they be simple desires for food or sex, neurotic compulsions, or the motives of an artist or scientist. And yet, we are often driven to deny or resist becoming conscious of these motives, and they are often available to us only in disguised form.
    6. 6. The id, the ego, and the superego The id (="the It“) is the completely unconscious, impulsive, childlike portion of the psyche that operates on the "pleasure principle" and is the source of basic impulses and drives; it seeks immediate pleasure and gratification. The super-ego is the moral component of the psyche, which takes into account no special circumstances in which the morally right thing may not be right for a given situation. The rational ego attempts to exact a balance between the impractical hedonism of the id and the equally impractical moralism of the super- ego; it is the part of the psyche that is usually reflected most directly in a person's actions.
    7. 7. When ego is overburdened or threatened by its tasks, it may employ defense mechanisms including denial repression, undoing, rationalization, repression, and displacement. This concept is usually represented by the "Iceberg Model". This model represents the roles the Id, Ego, and Super Ego play in relation to conscious and unconscious thought. Freud compared the relationship between the ego and the id to that between a charioteer and his horses: the horses provide the energy and drive, while the charioteer provides direction.
    8. 8. Dreams Freud believed that the function of dreams is to preserve sleep by representing as fulfilled wishes that would otherwise awaken the dreamer. He also believed that there is a specific psychological technique through which dreams can be interpreted, and that, if the technique is successfully accomplished, each dream is revealed as a psychical structure, which has a significant meaning and functioning in the mental activities of the awakened life.
    9. 9. The great question that has never been answered, and which I have not yet been able to answer, despite my thirty years of research into the feminine soul, is “What does a woman want?” (SIGMUND FREUD, Ernest Jones' Sigmund Freud: Life and Work) FREUD‟S QUOTES
    10. 10. He was influenced by: Aristotle, Börne, Brentano,Breuer, Charco, Darwin,Dostoyevsky, Empedocles, Fliess, Goethe, Haeckel, Hartmann,Jackson, Jacobsen, Kant, Mayer,Nietzsche, Plato, Schopenhauer,Shakespeare, Sophocles He influenced: Adorno, Althusser, Bass, Bloom,Breton, Brown, Chodorow, Dalí,Deleuze, Derrida, Firestone, Anna Freud, Fromm, Gallop, Gilligan,Grosz, Guattari, Habermas,Horney, Irigaray, Janov, Jones,Jung, Kandel, Khanna, Klein, Kovel, Kristeva, Lacan, Lyotard,Marcuse, Mitchell,Molyneux, Perls, Rank,Reich, Rieff, Sartre,Solms, Stekel, Sullivan, Trilling
    11. 11. GIANNOULIS SOZOS B‟1 Project 2013-‟14
    12. 12.  Bertrand Arthur William Russell was born at Trelleck on 18th May, 1872. At the age of three he was left an orphan. His father had wished him to be brought up as an agnostic. Instead of being sent to school he was taught by governesses and tutors, and acquired a perfect knowledge of French and German.  After spending some months in Berlin studying social democracy, they went to live near Haslemere, where he devoted his time to the study of philosophy.Then, visited the Mathematical Congress at Paris. He was offered a post at Harvard university, but was refused a passport.  Russell was a prominent anti-war activist; he championed anti- imperialism and went to prison for his pacifism during World War I.Later, he campaigned against Adolf Hitler.
    13. 13. •He was a British philosopher , mathematician and pacifist . Russell as a writer and man continued the family tradition in political thought and action, with anti-war action . •Considered one of the founders of analytic philosophy along with his protégé Wittgenstein. •One of his first projects was the Principia Mathematica. •Other famous works: "Political Ideals", "History of Philosophy." His text "Why I am not a Christian" was a manifesto of atheism. •In 1950 he was awarded the Nobel Prize.
    14. 14.  In this volume Bertrand Russell outlines the basic tenets of his political code. Political Ideals is an important survey of capitalism, socialism and the organisation of society.  Political Ideals was written during the World War One, but still significant to every reader interested in the nature of man's responsibilities and privileges as a social being.  It is in many ways, a statement, of Bertrand Russell's beliefs, a declaration of the ideas that have influenced his thinking on the major events of the twentieth century.
    15. 15. • Typical dislike towards any kind of fanaticism is the statement: “There will never die for my ideas ,because I may have made a mistake ideas . •“Fanaticism is the gravest danger there is: I might almost say that I was fanatical against fanaticism.” •“The love and knowledge to push up into the heavens , but always pity to return to the earth . Screams of pain echoed in my heart hungry children , victims tortured old man who were left helpless . I long to alleviate the pain , but I can not and so , and I suffer .”
    16. 16.  Russell's activism against British participation in World War I led to fines, a loss of freedom of travel within Britain and he that he had interfered in British foreign politic was eventually sentenced to prison in 1918 on the tenuous grounds but was still closely supervised until the end of the war.  In 1958, Russell became the first president of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. He resigned two years later and formed the Committee of 100.
    17. 17.  In 1955, Russell released the Russell-Einstein Manifesto, co-signed by Albert Einstein and nine other leading scientists, a document which led to the first of the Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs in 1957.  The Russell–Einstein Manifesto was issued in London on 9 July 1955 by Bertrand Russell in the midst of the Cold War. It highlighted the dangers posed by nuclear weapons and called for world leaders to seek peaceful resolutions to international conflict.
    18. 18.  The Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation was established in 1963. The foundation aims to continue the work of the philosopher and activist Bertrand Russell in the areas of peace, social justice, and human rights, with a specific focus on the dangers of nuclear war. Its director was Ken Coates.  Spokesman Books is the publishing imprint of the Bertrand Russell Peace Foundation and publishes books on politics, peace and disarmament, and history.
    19. 19.  Russell died of influenza on 2 February 1970 at his home in Wales.  In 1980 a memorial to Russell was commissioned by a committee. It consists of a bust of Russell in Red Lion Square in London.
    20. 20. Philosopher BY ANTHONY KASSIS
    21. 21. He was born in 15 of October 1844 grew up in a small town in Prussia and his parents where Carl Ludwig Nietzsche and Franziska Oehler, he also had a younger sister Elizabeth and brother An insident that affected him was his fathers deathe in 1849 and his brothers a year after
    22. 22.  He attended a boys' school and thena private school. Τhere he learned Greek Latin Hebrew and French and was also was composing music and poems  He began his studies in theology and classical philology at the university of Bonn at 1864 and he was offered to teach as a professor before completing his doctorate which he accepted
    23. 23.  Nietzche was mostly affected by the work of philosopher Arthur Schopenhauer.  Other affections may come from David Strauss‟s Life of Jesus, his professor Friedrich Wilhelm Ritschl and his friend Erwin Rohde as well as Richard Wagner
    24. 24.  The major part of his work concearn morals and how it was formed through the ages.  He is mostly known about his ideas about the Death of God, the superman, the eternal reccurence and The will to power
    25. 25.  God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him. Yet his shadow still looms. How shall we comfort ourselves, the murderers of all murderers?  This statement may be a proof of the philosophers atheistic belifs or as many say a better understanding of divinity after his observations that God not as a person but as values and morals has being “killed” by people of the West
    26. 26.  According to Lampert, "the death of God must be followed by a long twilight of piety and nihilism. Zarathustra's gift of the overman is given to a mankind not aware of the problem to which the overman is the solution.“  The overman is to man as is man to ape  The overman is the complete opposite of the Last man (one that takes no risks and lives in complete comfort, something that the philosopher despises)
    27. 27.  A basic element in Nietzsche's philosophical outlook and is an indication of his deep understanding of human behavior  According to Nietzsche human behavior is defined mostly by their need to prove and exert their strength rather than the need to survive.  With this notion he rejected many concepts of other philosophers such as Schopenhauer's
    28. 28.  This is the concept which Nietzsche himself believes is the most important of his ideas.  It is the idea that the universe has been recurring, and will continue to recur, in a self-similar form an infinite number of times across infinite time or space
    29. 29.  He has affected mankind in a different and not completely good way and has been a philosopher analyzed by many mostly over the last few decades.
    30. 30. People of the 20th century that have affected the Western Culture
    31. 31. Herbert Marcuse (1898–1979) was one of the most prominent members of the Frankfurt School or The Institute for Social Research in Frankfurt am Main. The Frankfurt School was formed in 1922 but went into exile in the United States in the early 1930s during the reign of the Third Reich. Although most of his colleagues returned to Germany after the World War Two, Marcuse remained in the United States.
    32. 32.  Herbert Marcuse was born on July 19, 1898 in Berlin.  Marcuse studied at the universities of Berlin and Freiburg.  He was a prominent figure in the Frankfurt-based Institute for Social Research - what later became known as the Frankfurt School.  In 1916 Marcuse was called to military duty. It was in the military where his political education began, although during this period his political involvement was brief. The experience of war and the German Revolution led Marcuse to a study of Marxism as he tried to understand “the dynamics of capitalism and imperialism, as well as the failure of the German Revolution” .
    33. 33.  Main interests  Social theory  Socialism  Industrialism  Technology  Notable ideas  Totally administered society, technological rationality, the Great Refusal, the end of Utopia, one-dimensional man, libidinal work relations, work as free play,
    34. 34.  The bookends of Marcuse's literary, philosophical, and political life are both works on aesthetics. In 1922 he completed a doctoral dissertation entitled Der deutsche Künstlerroman (The German Artist-Novel). One year before his death he published The Aesthetic Dimension: Toward A Critique of Marxist Aesthetics.  Celebrated as the "Father of the New Left", his best known works are Eros and Civilization (1955) and One-Dimensional Man (1964). His Marxist scholarship inspired many radical intellectuals and political activists in the 1960s and '70s, both in the U.S. and internationally.
    35. 35. •The work offers a wide-ranging critique of both contemporary capitalism and the Communist society of the Soviet Union, documenting the parallel rise of new forms of social repression in both these societies, as well as the decline of revolutionary potential in the West. Marcuse argues that "advanced industrial society" created false needs, which integrated individuals into the existing system of production and consumption via mass media, advertising, industrial management, and contemporary modes of thought. •This results in a "one-dimensional" universe of thought and behaviour, in which aptitude and ability for critical thought and oppositional behaviour wither away. Against this
    36. 36.  Herbert Marcuse died in July 29,1979.  His works that he left was:  Hegel's Ontology and Theory of Historicity (1932) originally written in German  Reason and Revolution: Hegel and the Rise of Social Theory (1941).  Eros and Civilization: A Philosophical Inquiry into Freud (1955).  Soviet Marxism: A Critical Analysis (1958)  One-Dimensional Man (1964).  A Critique of Pure Tolerance (1965) Written with Robert Paul Wolff and Barrington Moore, Jr.  Negations: Essays in Critical Theory (1968)  An Essay on Liberation (1969)  Counterrevolution and Revolt (1972)  The Aesthetic Dimension: Toward a Critique of Marxist Aesthetics (1978)  Five Lectures (1969)
    37. 37. Project 2013-14 Albert Einstein‟s Life Andreas Marinakis
    38. 38. "Any intelligent fool can make things bigger, more complex, and more violent. It takes a touch of genius -- and a lot of courage -- to move in the opposite direction."
    39. 39. Albert was born on March 14, 1879 in Ulm, in the Germans Empire. Albert was a typical boy in elementary school with difficulties in his speech, yet he was the top student. His curiosity began when his father showed him a pocket compass and thought “There must be something in there that causes the needle to spin besides the “empty space”.” Einstein built models and mechanical devices just for fun which showed his mathematical skills.
    40. 40. When his fathers company failed in 1894, his family moved to different places. He then decided to stay in Munich to finish his studies. His father intended for him to pursue in electrical engineering. When Einstein joined his family in Pavia, he wrote his first scientific work The Investigation of the State of Aether in Magnetic fields.” Einstein finished secondary school at age 17.
    41. 41. Einstein met Mileva Marić the same year he enrolled at the Polytechnic. Over the years their friendship developed into romance. In early 1902, They had a daughter named Lieserl. A year later, Einstein and Mileva married. They then had two sons names Hans Albert and Eduard. After 16 years of marriage Einstein and Marić divorced for the reason that they had been living their lives apart for 5 years. Einstein remarried a couple months later with Elsa Lowenthal. They both immigrated to the United States. She then died in 1936.
    42. 42. After completing his thesis with Alfred Kleiner, Albert was awarded a PhD by the University of Zurich. Annus_Mirabilis That same year, in 1905 Albert published 4 “Annus Mirabilis” papers which were on the photoelectric effect, Brownian motion, special relativity, and the equivalence of matter and energy. These papers introduced him to his academic career. Three years later, he was recognized as a leading scientist and became a professor.
    43. 43. Einstein was forced to leave Germany and enter the U.S due to the new Chancellor, Adolf Hitler. Albert had never felt so Jewish in his life. Other scientists emigrated to the United States.
    44. 44. Before the beginning of World War II, Albert was forced to write a letter to the president of the United States, to inform him about Hitler‟s plans in developing an atomic bomb. The letter gave Franklin D. Roosevelt the idea to join the race on building bombs.
    45. 45. On April 17, 1955 Albert suffered from internal bleeding caused by the rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm. Albert did not want surgery and said “I want to go when I want. It is tasteless to prolong life artificially. I have done my share, it is time to go. I will do it elegantly.” Einstein died at the age of 76. He was having to work until the last day of his life.
    46. 46. During the autopsy, the pathologist removed Einstein‟s brain without the permission of his family in hope that neuroscience of the future will be able to figure out why Albert Einstein was so intelligent.
    47. 47. Project 2013-14 Albert Einstein Albert Einstein Theories Hercules Karagiannis
    48. 48.  Produced 4 revolutionary papers  1. Particle Nature: Nature of light can be explained through math (contradicts prior beliefs)  2. Brownian Motion: explained random movements of particles to prove existence of atoms  3. Electro Dynamics: Simultaneity is impossible and space and time are relative led to theory of Relativity  4. Mass & Energy equivalence: Shows that mass can be converted into energy E=mc2
    49. 49.  Theory of Special relativity said that in certain situations space and time are relative  This contradicted many beliefs and led many people to question their beliefs in the universe and god
    50. 50.  General Relativity states that gravity distorts spacetime mathematically his theories were correct needed proof used pictures of an eclipse to show that light is bent by gravity proves anywhere that gravity is space and time are relative shakes peoples belief in universe and god even more
    51. 51.  Einstein motivated many Scientists including Niels Bohr  Bohr was motivated by Einstein to study atoms and radiation  1920: Discovered that the movement of electrons was completely random  Made people disbelieve in god because certain things in life were by chance
    52. 52.  Einstein wanted to connect the electromagnetic field and gravitational field to prove this was supposed to disprove Bohr  Showed Einstein was getting older he wanted to keep physics the way they were no sudden changes because it did not agree with his belief in god
    53. 53.  1939: Einstein was convinced by European researchers that his theory of mass energy equivalence could lead to the creation of high powered explosions  Einstein wrote to president Roosevelt to warn him about the problem  This began the Manhattan project which was responsible for researching the destructive power of splitting atoms  Einstein was not hired because he was a possible security risk but did solve some equations for the project
    54. 54.  Imagination is more important than knowledge.  The only reason for time is so that everything doesn't happen at once.  Everything should be as simple as possible, but not simpler.  The world is a dangerous place to live;not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don’t do anything about it.  A person who never made a mistake never tried anything new.  I fear the day that technology will surpass our human interaction. The world will have a generation of idiots.
    55. 55.  Einstein was the most influential scientist of modern time and possibly ever  Although his theories are difficult for the common person to understand the concepts and results of his theories changed the course of world history
    56. 56. IO VOSSINIOT I
    57. 57.  Tim Burton is an American film director.  He use comedy in order to express tragedy.  Many of his films are based on his drawings and his experiences of his childhood .
    58. 58.  Burton start making short films in his backyard on Evergreen Street using crude stop motion animation techniques or shoot them on 8mm film without sound (one of his oldest know juvenile films is The Island of Doctor Agor , which he made when he was 13 years old).  He has direct 30 movies and 7 stop motion films without sound.
    59. 59.  Beginning  Often does the beginning credits sequence with the camera going through something or following something  He often likes to open his films with a quiet nighttime
    60. 60. Ios Vosinioti 2013-2014 FANTASIA ΓΕΛ-ΑΙΓΗΝΑΣ
    61. 61. Fathers are portrayed in a negative light in his films. Whether they be dead (Batman(1989)), purposely ditched their children (Batman Returns(1992)), the main characters have remorse against them because of bad childhood memories (Sleepy Hollow(1999),Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005), or weren't there while their child was growing up (Sweeney Tood: The Demon Barber
    62. 62. Characters often wear striped clothing, particularly black-and- white stripes (for example, Beetlejuice, Sweeney and Mrs. Lovett in "Sweeney Todd", Katrina in "Sleepy Hollow", and Tweedledum and Tweedledee in "Alice in Wonderland").
    63. 63. Often shows factory assembly line sequences (e.g. Edward Scissorhands(1990),Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005) and 9 (2009)).
    64. 64.  His films often have a Gothic feel to them, often including Christmas and/or Halloween scenes.  Plot often focuses around a misunderstood outcast  Frequently uses composer Danny Elfman
    65. 65.  Frequently features dead or dismembered dogs  Many of his films feature townspeople who misunderstand and distrust the lead character
    66. 66.  Obsession with horror actors: he makes movies about them (Vincent (1982), Ed Wood (1994)), or he actually casts them in his films ).  Often shows scarecrows in his movies  His movies always opens with a personal version of the studio's logo  Usually includes fantasy elements in his films
    67. 67.  Most his films tend to be either dark or colorful, and sometimes contain scenes of both.  Affectionate homages to the films of his childhood  Long unwashed hair, black clothing and large sunglasses  His characters are often friendly and optimistic despite their bleak
    68. 68.  Effective use of musical interludes  Extremely dark Gothic atmosphere in buildings and set design  Many of his films prominently feature castles, churches or other old buildings  His stories are often set in non specific locations and incorporate elements from Britain and America
    69. 69.  His antagonists are often coldly superior, brutal and thuggish but avoid getting noticed by other characters  His heroes are often neurotic, somewhat cowardly and bizarre yet also intelligent and highly moral
    70. 70. Jeffrey Jones, Paul Reubens, Glenn Shadix, Michael Keaton, Lisa Marie,Johnny Depp, Helena Bonham Carter, Michael Gough, Deep Roy and Christopher Lee.
    71. 71. Tim Burton’s most famous movies are: * Beetlejuice (1988) * Batman (1989) * Edward Scissorhands (1990) *The Nightmare before Christmas (1993) * Ed Wood (1994) * Sleepy Hollow (1999) * Big Fish (2003) * Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005) * Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2007)
    72. 72.  Timothy Walter Burton was born in 1958, in the city of Burbank, California  His mother is Jean Burton, the owner of a cat-themed gift shop, and his father is Bill Burton, a former minor league baseball player. He also has a younger brother( whom used him as his actor on his first short film)  Burton studied at Burbank High School, but he was not a particularly good student.  He was a very introspective person, and found his pleasure in painting, drawing and watching films. His future work would be heavily influenced by the works of such childhood heroes as Dr. Seuss and Roald Dahl.
    73. 73.  After graduating from Burbank High School with Jeff Riekenberg, Burton attended the California Institute of the Arts to study character animation. Some of his classmates were John Lasseter, Nancy Beiman, Brad Bird, John Musker and Henry Selick. (In the future, Selick and Burton would work together in The Nightmare Before Christmas and James and the Giant Peach.)  As a student in CalArts, Burton made the shorts Stalk of the Celery Monster and King and Octopus. They remain only in fragments today.
    74. 74. Early career: 1980s  Burton graduated from CalArts in Santa Clarita, California in 1979. The success of his short film Stalk of the Celery Monster attracted the attention of Walt Disney Productions' animation studio, who offered young Burton an animator's apprenticeship at their studio. He worked as an animator, storyboard artist and concept artist on films such as The Fox and the Hound, The Black Cauldron and Tron.  However, Burton's personal style clashed with Disney's standards, and he longed to work on solo projects.
    75. 75.  While at Disney in 1982, Burton made his first short, Vincent, a six-minute black-and-white stop motion film based on a poem written by the filmmaker, and depicting a young boy who fantasizes that he is his hero Vincent Price, with Price himself providing narration. The film was produced by Rick Heinrichs, whom Burton had befriended while working in the concept art department at Disney. The film was shown at the Chicago Film Festival and released, alongside the teen drama Tex, for two weeks in one Los Angeles cinema.
    76. 76.  In 2009, the short went on display in the Museum of Modern Art, and in 2011 the short also played at the Tim Burton art exhibit at the LACMA.  Burton's next live-action short, Frankenweenie, was released in 1984. It tells the story of a young boy who tries to revive his dog after it is run over by a car. After Frankenweenie was completed, Disney fired Burton, under the pretext of him spending the company's resources on doing a film that would be too dark and scary for children to see.
    77. 77.  Pursuing then an opportunity to make a full-length film, he was approached by Griffin Dunne to direct the black comedy film After Hours. However, after Martin Scorsese's project The Last Temptation of Christ was cancelled (although it would later be completed and released in 1988), he showed an interest in directing it. Respectfully, Burton bowed out.  Burton reunited with Johnny Depp on the film Ed Wood (1994). From that moment Johnny Depp and Burton will work together many times (Edward Scissorhands , The Nightmare before Christmas , Sleepy Hollow Charlie and the Chocolate Factory e.t.c )
    78. 78.  While on the set of Planet of the Apes (2001), Burton met Helena Bonham Carter, to whom he is now currently engaged and has a son with.
    79. 79.  His early film career was fueled by almost unbelievable good luck, but it's his talent and originality that have kept him at the top of the Hollywood tree. • He has 16 wins ((Best Feature for "Corpse Bride" Corpse Bride (2005) on British Animation Awards etc.)) • and 40 nominations ((Best Animated Feature Frankenweenie (2012) , Best Animated Feature Film of the Year Corpse Bride (2005) on the Academy Awards, USA etc )).
    80. 80.  "I remember when I was younger, I had these two windows in my room, nice windows that looked out onto the lawn, and for some reason my parents walled them up and gave me this little slit window that I had to climb up on a desk to see out of. To this day I never asked them why; I should ask them.“  "Nobody had his style. That's something I try to do in my films. You have your own kind of cryptic messages in there - cryptic things that most people wouldn't understand but are important to you. Things that kind of keep you going through the process."
    81. 81.  "There was one moment, and it happened in school. I had a big final exam--we were supposed to write a 20-page report on this book about Houdini [Harry Houdini]. I probably would have loved reading it, but I didn't, so I just decided to make a little super-8 movie based on it. I tied myself to the railroad tracks and all that. I mean, this is kid stuff, but it impressed the teacher, and I got an A. And that was maybe my first turning point, when I said, 'Yeah, I wouldn't mind being a filmmaker.' "
    82. 82. Did you know that Burton use to draw Edward Scissorhands , sinse he was 16 without knowing that this character will be the most popular one, on his futer carier?
    83. 83. Team: FANTASIA ΓΕΛ.ΑΙΓΙΝΑΣ Όλγα Ζωγράφου
    84. 84.  He made silent and black and white films.  Because of his sad childhood , he tried (and achieved) to make films with happy ending no matter how difficult the situation for the hero was .  His films always takes place in a society of poverty and sadness.
    85. 85.  He was known worldwide by the nickname Charlie and in Greece as „„Charlot‟‟.  He was an English actor and director who created his masterpieces in the first decades of Hollywood.  Charles also was the script writer and the director in his movies.  Because of his movies modern times and great dictator was categorized as one of the most important creators of the seventh art.
    86. 86.  The Great Dictator  The kid  Shoulder Arms  City lights  Modern times
    87. 87.  He was born in London, England.  Both of his parents were artists Music Hall called Charles Chaplin and Hannah Harriet Chaplin.  His father was an alcoholic and one year after Charles was born, he abandoned his family.
    88. 88.  He had miserable childhood. Due to his mother‟s sickness and consequently her resignation from her work, they were made to move out continuously and live under bleak conditions.  A few years later, his mother was transferred into a psychiatric clinic and her two children into an orphanage from which they had their worst memories.
    89. 89.  His first contact with the art was in the age of five when he replaced his sick mother for a show. He sang a famous song in a funny way, receiving an enormous applause.  Later, he became a member of a troupe.
    90. 90.  I suppose that‟s one of the ironies of life doing the wrong thing at the right time.  We think too much and feel too little.  I have many problems in my life . But my lips don‟t know that , they always smile !
    91. 91.  My pain may be the reason for somebody‟s laugh. But my laugh must never be the reason for somebody‟s pain.  Life is a magnificent thing, even to a jellyfish…The trouble is you won‟t fight . You‟ve given up. But there‟s something just as inevitable as death. And that‟s life. Think of the power of universe turning the Earth, growing the trees. That‟s the same power within you , if you‟ll only have the courage and the will to use it!
    92. 92.  ‘‘ You need power only when you want to do something harmful , otherwise love is enough to get everything done.’’
    93. 93. Styling  We all wonder why Charlie was dressed in this strange and at the same time funny way.  The answer is that once his boss said to him : „„ We need something funny . Find a suit for a comedy , whatever you want.‟‟  And then, he ran to his dress department which he shared with several other comedians and started looking their closets. He took from each of them something. Finally, he got a piece of black cloth and stuck it as mustache.
    94. 94.  In an interview he said : ‘‘ I had no idea of the character . But the moment I was dressed , the clothes and the make- up made me feel the person he was. I began to know him , and by the time I walked onto the stage he was fully born.’’
    95. 95. The first time that Charlie got an Oscar he won the longest applause of the history of the awards . Total ,he won four Oscars and other nineteen different awards.
    96. 96. In the early morning of Christmas 1977, Charlie Chaplin died in his sleep. He was 88 years old. After his death, the director Rene Clair wrote : „„He was a monument of the cinema, of all countries and of all times…the most beautiful gift the cinema made to us.‟‟
    97. 97. However , how many years go by, Charles will always have a special place in our hearts. He will teach us again and again that even the poverty, the misery can not make us stop hoping and dreaming of a better tomorrow.
    98. 98. FANTASIA Joanna Kaklamanou B1 2013-2014 ΓΕΛ ΑΙΓΙΝΑΣ
    99. 99.  Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock was an English film director and producer.  He pioneered many techniques in the suspense and psychological thriller genres.  After a successful career in British cinema in both silent films and early talkies, renowned as England's best director, Hitchcock moved to Hollywood in 1939 and became a U.S. citizen in 1955.
    100. 100.  Over a career spanning more than six decades, Hitchcock directed more than fifty films.  He pioneered the use of a camera made to move in a way that mimics a person's gaze, forcing viewers to engage in a form of voyeurism.  He framed shots to maximise anxiety, fear, or empathy, and used innovative film editing.
    101. 101.  His stories often feature fugitives on the run from the law alongside "icy blonde" female characters.  Many of Hitchcock's films have twist endings and thrilling plots featuring depictions of violence, murder, and crime.  Hitchcock's films also borrow many themes from psychoanalysis.
    102. 102.  Hair He likes to insert shots of a woman's hairstyle, frequently in close-ups.  Bathrooms Often a plot device as a hiding place. He was the first director who showed the flushing of a toilet
    103. 103.  MacGuffin It is a plot device in the form of a desired object that the protagonist pursues. The most common type of MacGuffin is an object such as papers or money.
    104. 104.  Blondes The most famous actresses in his filmography were Joan Fontaine
    105. 105. Grace Kelly Kim Novak
    106. 106. Ingrid Bergman Tippi Hedren
    107. 107. Vera Miles
    108. 108.  Cameo (= A crew member of a movie playing a minor role) Hitchcock often has a quick cameo in his films. He made a live cameo appearance in 39 of his 52 surviving major films, beginning with The Lady Vanishes (1938).
    109. 109. Fans would make sport of trying to spot his cameos. He eventually began making his appearances within the first half-hour of his films because he knew viewers were watching for him and he didn't want to divert their attention away from the story's plot.
    110. 110. Hitchcock’s most famous movies are: The man who knew too much (1934,1956) The 39 steps (1935) The lady vanishes (1938) Rebecca (1940) Vertigo (1958) Psycho (1960) The birds (1963) Marnie (1964)
    111. 111.  He was born in 1899 in England.  His father was a green grocer called William Hitchcock and his mother was Emma Jane Whelan. He had two older siblings, William and Eileen.  He grew up in a very strict Roman Catholic family. He attended St. Ignatius College and a school for engineering and navigation.  He often described a lonely and sheltered childhood worsened by his obesity.
    112. 112.  In 1914, when he was 15 years old, his father died.  In the same year, he left St. Ignatius to study at the London County Council School of Engineering and Navigation.  During the First World War, Hitchcock was rejected for military service because of his obesity.
    113. 113.  In 1920s , Hitchcock joined the film industry.  He started off drawing the sets (he was a very skilled artist).  His first directing project came in 1922 titled Number 13 but due to financial problems the production was cancelled.
    114. 114.  In 1926, Hitchcock directed his first thriller, The Lodger: A Story of the London Fog.  The film, released in January 1927, was a major commercial and critical success in the United Kingdom.  Following the success of The Lodger, Hitchcock hired a publicist to help strengthen his growing reputation.
    115. 115.  In 1933, Hitchcock was working at Gaumont-British Picture Corporation.  His first film for the company, The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), was a success and his second, The 39 Steps (1935), is often considered one of the best films from his early period.
    116. 116.  On December of 1926, Hitchcock married his assistant director, Alma Reville, in South Kensington, London.  Their only child, daughter Patricia, was born on July 1928. Alma was to become Hitchcock's closest collaborator.
    117. 117.  By the end of the 1930s Hitchcock's reputation was beginning to soar overseas, with a New York Times feature writer stating: "Three unique and valuable institutions the British have that we in America have not. Magna Carta, the Tower Bridge and Alfred Hitchcock, the greatest director of screen melodramas in the world"
    118. 118.  In March 1939, Hitchcock signed a seven-year contract moved to Hollywood with his family.  In 1940, he made his first American movie, Rebecca, based on a british novel.  The film won the Academy Award for Best Picture of that year.
    119. 119.  Hitchcock's films during the 1940s were diverse, ranging from the romantic comedy Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941) to the courtroom drama The Paradine Case (1947) and the dark and disturbing film noir Shadow of a Doubt (1943).
    120. 120.  In 1955, Hitchcock became a United States citizen.  The film, To Catch a Thief (1955) was Hitchcock's last film starring Grace Kelly.  In 1956, she married Prince Rainer of Monaco, and the residents of her new land were against her making any more films.
    121. 121.  Hitchcock successfully remade his own film The Man Who Knew Too Much in 1956.  This time, the film starred Doris Day, who sang the theme song, "Que Sera, Sera", which won the Oscar for Best Original Song and became a big hit for her.
    122. 122. Psycho is almost certainly Hitchcock's best-known film.  Psycho was shot in black-and-white on a spare set and it was the most profitable film of Hitchcock's career, earning $15 million by the end of the first year.  The public loved the film, with lines stretching outside of theatres as people had to wait for the next showing.
    123. 123.  It broke box-office records in China and the rest of Asia, France, Britain, South America and the United States.
    124. 124. The unprecedented violence of the shower scene, the early death of the heroine and the innocent lives extinguished by a disturbed murderer became the defining hallmarks of Hitchcock's new horror movie genre and have been copied by many authors of subsequent horror films.
    125. 125.  Hitchcock died in his Bel Air home of renal failure on April 1980.  Hitchcock's funeral was held at a Catholic Church in Beverly Hills, after which his body was cremated and his remains were scattered over the Pacific Ocean.
    126. 126. Hitchcock was a multiple nominee and winner of a number of prestigious awards, receiving two Golden Globes, eight Laurel Awards and five lifetime achievement awards.
    127. 127.  He had also been nominated five times for, albeit never winning, an Academy Award as Best Director.  His film Rebecca was nominated for 11 Oscars.  In addition to these, Hitchcock received a knighthood in 1980 by Queen Elizabeth II
    128. 128.  Variety magazine referred to him as, "probably the best native director in England."  Hitchcock's innovations and vision have influenced a great number of filmmakers, producers, and actors.  The magazine MovieMaker has described him as the most influential filmmaker of all time, and he is widely regarded as one of cinema's most significant artists.
    129. 129. Hitchcock (2012) The Girl (2012)
    130. 130. 1st High School of Aegina Team: Death deities School Year: 2013-2014 Project Members: With the great director Alexandra Tantaoui, and guest star Eleftheria Klimantiri, Daria Montina starring Froso Lalioti
    131. 131. Asterix (French: Astérix) is a fictional character, the titular hero of the French comic book series The Adventures of Asterix.
    132. 132. Created by Max Fleischer; an American animator and film maker Cartoons made by Fleischer: Betty Boop, Superman, Koko the clown and Popeye Max was responsible for a number of technological innovations.
    133. 133. Betty Boop is an animated cartoon character appearing in the Talkartoon an d Betty Boop series of films produced by Max Fleischer and released by Paramount Pictures She was a hit due to her sexuality Eventhough she was created in the 1930’s, she is still popular today for that compelling sexuality she compells
    134. 134. First female flapper cartoon ever First appearance: August 9 ,1930 in the cartoon dizzy dishes #the sixth installment in Fleischer’s Talkartoon series She was originally created and designed by Grim Natwick She was modeled on Helen Kane, a singer and contract player for paramount Pictures
    135. 135. In keeping with common practice, Natwick made his new character an animal, in this case, a French poodle Beginning with this cartoon, the character's voice was performed by several different voice actresses until Mae Questel got the role, in 1931, and kept it for the rest of the series. Natwick himself later conceded that Betty's original look was quite ugly. The animator redesigned her in 1932 to be recognizably human in the cartoon Any Rags #a flapper girl with more heart than brains She usually served as studio star Bimbo's girlfriend She was not officially christened "Betty Boop" until the 1932 short Stopping the Show that same year.. This was also the first cartoon to be officially part of the Betty Boop series and not a Talkartoon.
    136. 136. first cartoon character to fully represent a sexual woman Revealed her sexuality in contrast with other female cartoon characters She wore short dresses and a garter belt Her breasts were prominent, and she showed her cleavage In her cartoons, other characters try to sneak peeks at her while she's changing the animators made sure to keep the character "pure" and girl-like (officially, she was only 16 years old) As Betty tells Koko the Clown in the film Boop- Oop-A-Doop after being threatened by a salacious ringmaster, "He couldn't take my boop-oop-a- doop away!" #jazz soundtracks The adult sensibilities of Betty's cartoons made her a hit, and a wave of merchandising soon swept the world. Meanwhile, Helen Kane, who had inspired the character in 1930, sued the Fleischer studio in 1934 for allegedly stealing her trademark look, dancing and singing style, and catchphrase. Kane lost the suit (and her boop-oop-a-doop) when the Fleischers proved that the phrase had been used by other performers before Kane
    137. 137. In the end, Betty's heightened sexuality would spell her doom. The Production Code censorship laws enforced beginning in 1934 forced her to wear a longer skirt and less revealing neckline Betty was no longer a flapper; she was a husbandless housewife with a little dog named Pudgy The animators struggled to keep Betty's cartoons interesting by pairing her with popular comic strip characters, but none of these films were very successful (though one such pairing did propel Popeye into stardom of his own). Betty's cartoon career came to an end, at least temporarily, in 1939 A Betty Boop comic strip by Max Fleischer was syndicated from 1934 through 1937. From 1984 through 1987, another strip, Betty Boop and Friends was produced by Brian Walker, Ned Walker, Greg Walker, and Morgan Walker
    138. 138. The Little Mermaid (Ariel) Ariel is the title character of Walt Disney Pictures' 28th animated film The Little Mermaid (1989).Ariel has a very distinctive appearance, with her long, flowing, bright red hair, aqua blue eyes, green mermaid tail and a lavender seashell bra. . In the films and television series, she is the seventh-born daughter of King Triton and Queen Athena of an underwater kingdom of Merfolk. She is often rebellious, and in the first film longs to be a part of the human world. She marries Prince Eric, whom she rescued from a shipwreck, and together they have a daughter, Melody.
    139. 139. The character is based on the title character of Hans Christian Andersen's "The Little Mermaid" story, but was developed into a different personality for the 1989 animated film adaptation. Hans Christian Andersen was born in the town of Odense, Denmark, on Tuesday, April 2, 1805. He was an only child. Andersen's father, also Hans, considered himself related to nobility. His paternal grandmother had told his father that their family had in the past belonged to a higher social class, but investigations prove these stories unfounded.
    140. 140. Ariel is the youngest and seventh daughter of King Triton and Queen Athena, rulers of Atlantica, and has six older sisters. She is often seen in the company of Flounder, her best friend, and Sebastian, her father's advisor who is often assigned to watch over her. In the television series and first film, Ariel has a fascination with the human world and often goes off to find human artifacts that she displays in a secret grotto.
    141. 141. Ariel is often rebellious, wandering off on her own to explore her surroundings, and frequently disobeys the orders of her father or Sebastian, causing conflict between the characters. In The Little Mermaid she is depicted as being willing to do anything to be with Prince Eric, even giving up her voice to become human. Clements described her as a typical teenager, prone to errors of judgment. She also is incredibly curious, and her curiosity often leads her into dangerous situations.
    142. 142. Ariel is kind to others no matter what their circumstances, as depicted in the television series. In an early episode, Ariel helps an orphaned merboy who had fallen in with a bad crowd. In another episode, Ariel befriends a supposed bad- luck creature and protects it from Ursula and other merfolk who wish it harm.
    143. 143. Ariel appears as an adult in Return to the Sea, and gives birth to a daughter named Melody. Ariel is protective of her daughter, as Triton was of Ariel in the first film. After Morgana threatens Melody, Ariel refuses to let Melody in the ocean. Ariel's Beginning depicts her personality as it was in the original film, after Jodi Benson had advocated returning the character to her roots. Ariel is once again rebellious, and after her father decrees music to be banned in Atlantica she runs away with Sebastian and his band.
    144. 144. FIGURES THAT AFFECTED THE CURRENT WESTERN CULTURE COCO CHANEL SIMONE DE BEAUVOIR
    145. 145. Coco Chanel
    146. 146. ΓΕΛ ΑΙΓΙΝΑΣ ΣΦΟΛΙΚΟ ΕΤΟΣ 2013-2014 ΕΡΕΥΝΗΤΙΚΗ ΕΡΓΑΣΙΑ
    147. 147. Biography • Gabrielle Bonheur "Coco" Chanel was born in 1883.Chanel was born into poverty in Saumur, France, and was taught to sew by the Catholic nuns who raised her from the age of twelve. As a young woman, singing cabaret, making dresses, she was possessed of an unusual, extreme confidence—a quality that, no doubt, was key to the success she later enjoyed and the triumphs she celebrated over competitors. As she confided to her friend Paul Morand, the short-story writer, “Arrogance is in everything I do. It is in my gestures, the harshness of my voice, in the glow of my gaze, in my sinewy, tormented face.” She grew fond of inventing stories that glossed over the less glamorous truths about her childhood. Yes, she was a notorious fabulist—but the stories she spun seemed to become reality as she rose to the pinnacle of fashionable society. . Her designs were unfussed, sometimes deceptively so, and the woman was as enigmatic as her work. She never married, but she was often on the arm of powerful, handsome, wealthy men, who helped her finance early efforts and guided the cultivation of important relationships, particularly during World War I. Coco Chanel dies in 1971, having worked furiously to finish her latest couture collection, which is staged two weeks later. The ivory tweed suits and white evening dresses are met with a standing ovation.
    148. 148. Contribution to Femininity Through Fashion • “I freed the body,” Coco Chanel once declared. And she did indeed, she created a new look for women in the 20th century, creating clothes that were primarily comfortable with a snip of her scissors and the use of liberating fabrics like jersey, revolutionize the way women dress. In fact, Mademoiselle practically invented modernism in fashion. More than a century after she began to design clothes, Chanel continues to loom large in the public imagination, and in imitators‟ ateliers. • Women could move and see the world in her clothes. “If you spoke to her of Christian Dior, she would say, „What are you going to do with a coat that takes up an entire suitcase?”. • Chanel came of age as a designer during the Great War, and during this period of economic contraction her pared-down sensibility and use of economical fabrics seem to distill not just what women wanted but what they needed. She tossed out the overembellishment of Belle Époque fashion that stifled the body. Gone were corsets, too. Chanel and the women who wore her work reveled in its chic simplicity. She was the first to borrow from the boys, a concept that continues to be modern today. • The seamlessness between clothing and feminism might indeed be what made Chanel designs so desirable and so timeless. But the potently quotable, ever-confident Chanel remarked on her legacy the best: “I created the most well-known style in the world,” she said, “because fashion is ephemeral, but style is eternal.”
    149. 149. Chanel's Impact on the Fashion World • As an individual, Coco is regarded as a genius and fashion icon. Coco is not remembered for being the nicest woman in history, but she is remarkable due to her immense creativity as a designer, and keen expertise in business. • Many people can create "trendy" fashion. But every designer cannot create innovative fashion with timeless appeal. As a dominant force in the fashion industry Coco Chanel knew how to create a masterpiece. Her simple quote, "Fashion fades, only style remains the same," captures the true essence of how she opted to approach her career as a designer. • During the twentieth century, by shrewdly employing every resource available to her, Coco Gabrielle Bonheur, rose to prominence as a businesswoman, defining herself as a foremost designer, who created the ultimate luxury brand -- CHANEL. Her brand and legacy continue to live on in fashion today.
    150. 150. de Beauv oir Born: 9 January 1908 Paris , France Died: 14, April 1986 (aged 78) Paris, France Partner:Jean Paul Sartre Relatives:Georges Bertrand de Beauvoir (father)
    151. 151. existentialist philosopher, a public intellectual, political activist and a social and feminist writer. Simone wrote numerous biographies, novels, essays, an autobiography and monographs on politics, social issues and philosophy.
    152. 152. SBeauvoir began her education in the private Catholic school for girls, the Institut Adeline Désir where she remained until the age of 17. It was here that she met Elizabeth Mabille (Zaza), with whom she shared an intimate and profound friendship until ZaZa‟s untimely death in 1929.
    153. 153. •Beauvoir passed the baccalauréat exams in mathematics and philosophy in 1925.•She studied mathematics at the Institut Catholique . • She then studied literature and languages at the Institut Sainte-Marie, passing exams in 1926 for Certificates of Higher Studies in French literature and Latin, before beginning her
    154. 154. •Studying philosophy at the Sorbonne, Beauvoir passed exams for : •Certificates in History of Philosophy, • General Philosophy, •Greek and Logic in 1927, •Ethics in 1928, •Sociology, •and Psychology.
    155. 155. Leibniz (German rationalist philosopher) Léon Brunschvig and completed her practice teaching at the lycée Janson-de-Sailly with fellow students, Merleau-Ponty and Claude Lévi-Strauss – with both of whom she remained in philosophical dialogue.•In 1929, she took second place in the highly competitive philosophy agrégation exam(a civil service competitive examination for some positions in the public education system), beating Paul Nizan and Jean Hyppolite and barely losing to Jean Paul-Sartre who took first (it was his •Although she was not an official student, Beauvoir attended lectures and sat for the agrégation at the
    156. 156. At 21 years of age, Beauvoir was the youngest student ever to pass the agrégation in philosophy and thus became the youngest philosophy teacher •At 21 years of age, Beauvoir was the youngest student ever to pass the agrégation in philosophy and thus became the youngest philosophy teacher in France.
    157. 157. EARLY LIFE•Simone de Beauvoir was a precocious and intellectually curious child from the beginning. •In addition to her own independent initiative, Beauvoir‟s intellectual zeal was also nourished by her father who provided her with carefully edited selections from the great works of literature and who encouraged her to read and write from an •Beauvoir always wanted to be a writer and a teacher, rather than a mother and a wife and
    158. 158. •Beauvoir had been a deeply religious child as a result of her education and her mother‟s training; however, at the age of 14, she had a crisis of faith and decided definitively that there was no God . She remained an atheist until her death. Her rejection of religion as followed by her decision to pursue and teach philosophy. Only once had she considered marriage to her cousin, Jacques Champigneulle. She never again entertained the possibility of marriage, instead preferring to live the life of an
    159. 159. One of her greatest achievement in life was her relationship with the philosopher Jean -Paul Sartre
    160. 160. For the rest of their lives, they were to remain “essential” lovers. Although never marrying (despite sartre‟s proposal in 1931), having children together, or even living in the same home, Sartre and Beauvoir remained intellectual and romantic partners until sartre‟s death in 1980.
    161. 161. THE SECOND SEX The Second Sex, recognized as one of the hundred most important works of the twentieth century and one of her best-known books, it deals with the treatment of women throughout history and is often regarded as a
    162. 162. •The main thesis of The Second Sex revolves around the idea that woman has been held in a relationship of long- standing oppression to man through her relegation to Being man‟s “other.” •What Beauvoir discovers in her multifaceted investigation into woman‟s situation, is that woman is consistently defined as the Other by man who takes on the role of the Self. •While it is natural for humans to understand themselves in opposition to others, this process is flawed when applied to the genders. In defining woman exclusively as Other, man is effectively denying her humanity.
    163. 163. •The book is divided into two major themes. •in Book i, entitled “facts and myths,” she asks how “female humans” come to occupy a subordinate position in society. To answer this question and to better understand her own identity de Beauvoir first turns to biology, psychoanalysis, and historical materialism. De Beauvoir is careful to claim that none of them is sufficient to explain woman‟s definition as man‟s other or her consequent oppression. She then moves to history to trace the emergence of male superiority in society, from nomadic hunter-gatherers through the French Revolution and contemporary times. Here she states , two factors
    164. 164. The most philosophically rich discussion of Book I comes in Beauvoir‟s analysis of myths (third part). There she tackles the way in which the preceding analyses (biological, historical, psychoanalytic, etc.) contribute to the formulation of the myth of the “eternal feminine.” which incorporates multiple myths of woman under it such as, the myth of the mother, the virgin, the motherland, nature, the married women , the prostitute and demonstrates how these myths have imprinted human consciousness, often to the disservice of women.
    165. 165. The second book , entitled “woman‟s life today ”Begins with Beauvoir‟s most famous assertion, “one is not Born, But rather Becomes, a woman.” The first section of Book II traces the education of woman from her childhood, through her adolescence and finally to her experiences of lesbianism and sexual initiation (if she has any).Her goal is to prove that women are not born “feminine” But shaped by a thousand external processes.
    166. 166. •woman‟s passivity and alienation are explored in what Beauvoir entitles her “situation and character” and her “justifications.” Beauvoir studies the roles of wife, mother, and prostitute to show how women, instead of transcending through work and creativity, are forced into monotonous existences of having children, tending house and being the sexual receptacles of the male libido. what she claims is that woman‟s situation is not a result of her character. Rather, her character is a result of her situation. For example her mediocrity, lack of accomplishment, laziness, passivity-all these qualities are the consequences of her subordination, not the cause.
    167. 167. •at the last part called „‟toward liBeration „‟ she emphasiZes the fact that women need access to the same kinds of activitie as men. •She demands that women be treated as equal to men and laws, customs and education must be altered to encourage this. •She also supports a fundamental existentialist belief which says that, each individual, regardless of sex, class or age, should be encouraged to define him or herself and to take on the individual responsibility that comes with freedom.
    168. 168. ..everything we are is the result of our choices, as we build ourselves out of our own resources and those which society gives us. we don ‟t only create our own values, we create ourselves.
    169. 169. Meaning.. Beauvoir: That being a woman is not a natural fact .it‟s the result of a certain history .there is no biological or psychological destiny that defines a woman as such . She is the product of a history of civilization ,first of all, which has resulted in her current status and secondly for each individual woman of her personal history ,in particular ,that of her childhood. This determines her as woman , creates in her something which is not at all innate or an essence , something that has been called the
    170. 170. •De Beauvoir researched and wrote the book in about 14 months when she was 38 years old .• Published in 1949 The Second Sex remains to this day one of the foundational texts in philosophy, feminism, and women‟s studies .
    171. 171. Other works she is famous for: The Mandarins(196 1) Beauvoir was awarded the Prix Goncourt prize in 1954 for it. She Came to Stay (1943) All Men are Mor
    172. 172. The Ethics of Ambiguity(1948) The Coming of Age Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter (autobiography) 1958
    173. 173. The Prime of Life, 1960 A Very Easy Death, 1964 Letters to Sartr
    174. 174. QUOTES
    175. 175. Man is defined as a human being and a woman as a female - whenever she behaves as a human being she is said to imitate the male.
    176. 176. Femininity is merely an acquired set of characteristics that a woman learns necessarily within the family and outside in society . It is difficult to explain the extremity of this position that denies the existence of other differences between the sexes , except the purely physical - biological . Feminism set purpose, and largely succeeded , to rid the woman of the burden of social prejudices about gender , which until then to make subordinate to man physically and mentally and , therefore , dependent and subservient to him. Today's women have almost dethrone the myth of femininity and have finally believe they are the same , equal with men empowering themselves . AS A RESULT.. However while they enjoy the fruits of emancipation they also struggle with all the collateral damage : fatigue from trying to assume many roles simultaneously , the uncertainty and insecurity of the " male " world , the "battle" with the other sex says no to an end , the alienation of a part of themselves.
    177. 177. FIGURES THAT AFFECTED THE NEWEST WESTERN CIVILIZATION
    178. 178. ΜΑΡΙΑ ΜΠΟΓΡΗ ΑΝΑ΢ΣΑ΢ΙΑ ΧΑΜΑΛΑΚΗ Present BILL GATES
    179. 179. William Henry "Bill" Gates III (born October 28, 1955) is an American business magnate, investor, programmer, nventor and philanthropist. Gates is the former chief executive and current chairman of Microsoft, the world’s largest personal-computer software company, which he co-founded with Paul Allen. He is also known as the world’s richest person for about the last 20 years being in the Forbes list of the wealthiest people and Bloomberg Billionaires list every year since 1995.
    180. 180.  In the later stages of his career, Gates has pursued a number of philanthropic endeavors, donating large amounts of money to various charitable organizations and scientific research programs through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, established in 2000.  Gates stepped down as chief executive officer of Microsoft in January 2000. He remained as chairman and created the position of chief software architect for himself.  In June 2006, Gates announced that he would be transitioning from full-time work at Microsoft to part-time work, and full-time work at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation..  Today he remains at Microsoft as chairman.
    181. 181. 2013 TOP 10 BILLIONAIRES No. Name Net worth (USD) Age Citizenship Source(s) of wealth 1 Carlos Slim $73.0 billion 73 Mexico Telmex, América Móvil, Grupo Carso 2 Bill Gates $67.0 billion 57 United States Microsoft 3 Amancio Ortega $57.0 billion 76 Spain Inditex Group 4 Warren Buffett $53.5 billion 82 United States Berkshire Hathaway 5 Larry Ellison $43.0 billion 68 United States Oracle Corporation 6 Charles Koch $34.0 billion 77 United States Koch Industries 7 David Koch $34.0 billion 72 United States Koch Industries 8 Li Ka-shing $31.0 billion 84 Hong Kong/ Canada Cheung Kong Holdings 9 Liliane Bettencourt $30.0 billion 90 France L'Oréal 10 Bernard Arnault $29.0 billion 63 France LVMH Moët Hennessy • Louis Vuitton
    182. 182. EARLY LIFE  Gates comes from a family with a prominent background as his father was a famous lawyer, his mother served on the board of Directors For First Intestate BancSystem and his maternal grandfather was a national bank president.  At the age of 13 he enrolled in Lakeside School. an exclusive preparatory school.  Finishing the Lakeside School in 1973, scoring 1590 out of 1600 on the SAT, he enrolled Harvard College.  However Gates dropped out of Harvard as his love about computers could not let him focus on his studies.
    183. 183. HIS LOVE ABOUT COMPUTERS  Gates took his first interest in programming when he was at he Lakeside when he tried to program the GE SYSTEM in BASIC and he was excused from math classes to pursue his interest.  At the of 13 created his first program called tic-tac-toe a game which allows players to play against the computer At the age of 17 he formed a venture with Allen called traf-o-Data with which he earned 20.000$ After that program a number of others followed especially at Harvard and in this way the summer of 1974 Gates and Allen decided to start their own company.
    184. 184. MICROSOFT Microsoft was founded by Bill Gates and Paul Allen on April 4, 1975 to develop and sell BASIC interpreters for Altair 8800. It rose to dominate the personal computer operating system market with MS-DOS in the mid-1980s, followed by the Microsoft Windows. The company's 1986 initial public offering, and subsequent rise in its share price, created an estimated three billionaires and 12,000 millionaires from Microsoft employees . Since the 1990s, it has increasingly diversified from the operating system market and has made a number of corporate acquisitions.
    185. 185.  Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (B&MGF or the Gates Foundation) is the largest private foundation in the world, founded by Bill and Melinda Gates. It is "driven by the interests and passions of the Gates family.“  The primary aims of the foundation are, globally, to enhance healthcare and reduce extreme poverty, and in America, to expand educational opportunities and access to information technology.  The foundation, based in Seattle, Washington, is controlled by its three trustees: Bill Gates, Melinda Gates and Warren Buffett .  The Foundation has been organized, as of April 2006, into four divisions, including core operations (public relations, finance and administration, human resources, etc.),and three grant-making programs:  Global Health Program  (Fight aids, tuberculosis and malaria, HIV research ,children’s vaccine program, etc.)  Global Development Program  (financial services for the poor, agricultural development, etc)  United States Program  (libraries, education, schools, scholarships etc.) Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
    186. 186.  In 2007, its founders were ranked as the second most generous philanthropists in America, and Warren Buffett the first. As of May 16, 2013, Bill Gates had donated US$28 billion to the foundation  The couple plans to eventually donate 95% of their wealth to charity.  on December 9, 2010, Gates, investor Warren Buffett, and Mark Zuckerberg (Facebook's CEO) signed a promise they called the "Gates- Buffet Giving Pledge", in which they promised to donate to charity at least half of their wealth over the course of time.
    187. 187. The Bill Gates, referring to the Foundation Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, he says : Melinda and I , we talked about it, even before we married . In my 40s , Microsoft was my primary activity . The big change for me was when I decided to make my Foundation primary purpose . It was a big change , although there is more in common between the two than you can imagine . To meet with scientists and to undertake difficult challenges makes people skeptical about the outcome. For the rest of my life , the Foundation will be one full-time employment . We are still working part-time for Microsoft. I had two careers and I'm lucky that both of them are quite spectacular results . I loved the Microsoft. This prepared me for what I do now . In the same way that I saw the computer revolution and the Internet, now I see child mortality rates to go down . I work long hours and try to learn as much as I can about these issues ˙ but I do this simply because I like it.
    188. 188.  It is not related with any particular religion. It has to do with human dignity and equality. The golden rule is that all lives have equal value and should treat people as we would like to be treated.
    189. 189. BILL GATES QUOTES
    190. 190. SUMMARY  Bill gates is admired by a number of people for his career, his fortune and his luxury lifestyle  However he should be double admired for his philanthropic work, his willing to offer to those who are in need. That is the real Bill Gates the human whose example should followed by everyone.
    191. 191. The End

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